Guess What you can Still Buy on Amazon (the Adolph expectation)

Well six Dr. Seuss books are now verboten on Amazon as are other books and the Clarence Thomas documentary pulled in time for black history month. I think this is an outrageous offense against free speech and expression but Amazon wants to display it’s virtue so they shall not be denied.

However there are some lines they will apparently not cross when it comes to banning books, to wit:

https://www.amazon.com/Adolf-Hitlers-Mein-Kampf-Bibliography/dp/1533484155/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=men+kampf&qid=1614750782&sr=8-3

In fact at Amazon you’ve got multiple choices if you want to read what old Chaplin mouth wants to say

Now of course I’m a free speech guy so I don’t have a problem if they want to sell this book or any other. In fact I think they should all be available, but we are now playing under the Amazon rules concerning things that they consider “offensive” so by their own standard some Dr. Seuss books are so “offensive” and “racist” they they will not be carried.

But apparently this rule doesn’t apply to Adolph.

Unexpectedly of course

Changing how we work

By Christopher Harper

Like more and more Americans, I decided to leave the big city and move to the hinterlands, where I can work via computer and save on taxes and housing costs.

Three years ago, I had proposed to my employer, Temple University, that I teach only online. I have taught online classes since 2005 and was good at it.

Unfortunately, my supervisor fought the plan. I challenged the decision throughout the bureaucracy, including a decision to join the teachers’ union. I finally got to teach one class a semester online after I filed a disability claim because of a bad back.

Fast forward to the pandemic. I was advising my colleagues and my college on how to teach online effectively.

Since I only have a few years left before I retire, my wife and I decided to move from Philadelphia to Muncy, Pennsylvania, a town of about 2,400 people in the north-central part of the state.

That move saves us about $1,000 a month on city taxes. Housing is half the cost for twice the space.

Moreover, research has demonstrated that students learn just as effectively online as they do in person. I’ve found that the discussion is far better online than in person because students don’t feel anxious about talking when they’re outside the classroom setting.

I teach asynchronously, which means there aren’t any silly Zoom meetings. I post prepackaged videos and study materials to a website. Students can work on the material at their own pace and refer back to materials they find challenging.

So far, Temple and other universities have not lowered the price for online classes—a reduction that should happen because virtual learning requires fewer buildings, less maintenance, and only a slightly higher increase in technological assistance.

I’m not alone in my desire to continue working from home. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, nearly a quarter of all Americans worked from home during the pandemic. A new Bucknell University Freeman College of Management survey also found that workers over 40 preferred telework. In contrast, younger workers are more likely to return to in-person work when possible. For more information, see https://www.bucknell.edu/sites/default/files/college_of_management/covid-19_telework_study_report.pdf

The survey of 400 people reported other interesting results:

–67% of those surveyed said telework helped improve the quality of their work. 
 –61% noted a productivity improvement.
 –60% said they performed their jobs better.

Coupled with the savings I and others made, I am more than happy to stay at home and continue teaching online. 

Obviously, some industries cannot be restructured for online-only work. But rethinking how we work has been at least one good effect of the pandemic.

Just a thought

For some reason this thought came to me at work last night

I’d bet real money that if you got in a time machine and traveled back to 1902 and told suffragette in the US and England that a century after women getting the vote you would see the following supported largely by the votes of women:

Gay Marriage
Transgenderism
Abortion

along with out of wedlock births becoming the norm and the nuclear family on it’s last legs and a large rejection of Christianity by the population I suspect they would have called you an alarmist.

And if they said those same folk would not be willing to define “woman” they would have laughed out loud at you.

Report from Louisiana: Teacheritis

Photo by Dan Dimmock on Unsplash

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT – I have about three months left in the classroom until I retire. I hope I can make it. It’s close…so close, yet seems so far away.

I have loved teaching; I’ve loved my kids, but I am so done with administrative decisions that devalue the human being in front of that classroom. I know every single job has its drawbacks and there are those ridiculous things that irritate a person everywhere they go. I’m not alone.

I am sure that part of my current negative attitude is more due to the fact that I’m about to be able to walk away than that my workplace is unbearable, because it is in no way unbearable. I love my admins in my school, my co-workers, my students, and my classroom itself.

And if this was a normal year, without Covid, it would certainly be better. But, y’all. I am exhausted just thinking about these next few weeks. This has been the most difficult year of my career.

Tell me if I’m being petty or ridiculous. It won’t hurt my feelings.

I have to be in my classroom or on duty to supervise kids at 6:55. I have first block planning, so I don’t have a class until 9:05, but that first block planning is often taken over by meetings, trainings, and on rare occasions covering another class. We will give the ACT test in two weeks and I won’t have a planning period then, but, mostly I have first-block planning.

My first class is at 9:05 and runs until 10:40. Next class, 10:45 – 12:15. At 12:15 students have lunch and beginning this week they will eat in my classroom as we attempt to make-up those snow days. I am required to have some instructional video or activity for them during this lunch period. And I must, of course, be in the room to supervise. Then my last class comes in at 12:40 – 2:15.

I have to go from 9:05-2:15 without a restroom break, unless I call someone, anyone, to come relieve me for a minute.

Not so bad, you think? Right? Hey, at least your day ends at 2:15, right?  No, not right.

Papers must be graded, lessons prepared, presentations done, copies made for the next day. Grades must be entered into the online gradebook, and then you have parent conferences or calls to make. There are the Behavior Tracking Forms to be filled out, emails to be read and responded to, and other random paperwork that comes across my desk. Time must be made to meet with or check on my mentor students. And don’t forget the cleaning and sanitizing because of Covid that needs to be done to the computers and desks.

Truly, I’m exhausted.

I honestly know on some level that it’s because I know the end is nigh, but really, it’s so easy to feel like the tasks just keep piling on. Nothing is ever taken away, just more piled on.

Okay, so I’m venting. 

I think it’s really best that I retire now, at 25 years, rather than go to 30 years for a little more money. I don’t think I have the tolerance or the energy to do all of this. I’m not sure I’m giving my students my very best anymore.

And that breaks my heart.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport, at Medium, and is the author of Cane River Bohemia: Cammie Henry and her Circle at Melrose Plantation. Follow her on Instagram @patbecker25 and Twitter @paustin110.

Kurt Schlichter: A Great Piece That misses the point

Sir Humphrey Appleby: Bernard, if the right people don’t have power, do you know what happens? The wrong people get it!

Yes Prime Minster: Power to the People 1988

I like Kurt Schlichter. He’s a fun guy to be with a great writer and one of the worst things about missing CPAC is not seeing him.

But I have to disagree with the premise of his latest piece titled: This Administration Is Already a Failure: A sample:

 Biden has managed to disappoint the Left, he was always going to disappoint the Right, and he probably disappointed his wife when he failed to call her doctor as she handed him his morning mush bowl.

Like everything Kurt writes it a great read and you should check it out but his argument is based on an incorrect presumption.

If you work under the assumption that the Biden Administration (Reminder we don’t say “Joe Biden” because he’s no more in charge these days than I am) had a goal to produce a prosperous America while rewarding Americans that voted for him by that standard this Administration is an abject failure.

But that’s not the goal of this administration or the reason why so many people worked so hard to steal this election and/or cover up its theft.

The actual goal for said people is to ensure that the members of the elite DC swamp and their friends and family were restored to the government / special interest gravy train ensuring them a comfortable life full of wealth & status at the taxpayer expense that was interrupted by four years of the Trump Administration

Under that standard not only has this administration been a smashing success but I suspect you will see many more successes along those lines over the next 47 months.

Unexpectedly of course

Well-deserved pushback against Chicago Monuments Project underway

Abraham Lincoln: The Head of State, designed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. It is one of Chicago monuments “under review.”

By John Ruberry 

Last week in my DTG post I wrote about the Chicago Monuments Project, Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s response to last summer’s riot surrounding the Christopher Columbus statue in Grant Park south of downtown.

The committee for the project earlier this month identified 41 monuments, mostly statues but also plaques, reliefs, and one painting. Five of the monuments are statues of Abraham Lincoln. Yes, that guy, the one who led the Union during the Civil War, which led to ending slavery in America. Illinois is the Land of Lincoln, that slogan has been emblazoned on every Illinois license plate for decades. His face is on all standard Illinois license plates. On every Illinois driver’s license and state ID card is Lincoln’s countenance–and automobile titles too.

Other monuments “under review” by the project include statues of Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Leif Erikson, Ulysses S. Grant, William McKinley, several pieces honoring Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet, and works featuring anonymous Native Americans. 

But don’t worry! Really! In a Chicago Sun-Times op-ed published last week–on Washington’s birthday–three of the project’s members assured us:

Various accounts, especially on social media, have inaccurately described this project as an effort to tear it all down. This could not be further from the truth. It is a discussion.

I don’t believe them. The “discussion,” in my opinion, is a first step to, yes, “tear it all down.” Liberals work by way of incrementalism. Many left-wing politicians, probably most, want to ban private ownership of guns. They can’t express that sentiment because of the predictable outrage–and it could mean that they’ll be voted out of office. So they start with the easier targets, such as bans on semi-automatic rifles. If they succeed they’ll move on to other firearms, ending with the banning the type of handgun Mrs. Marathon Pundit purchased this year.

So the Chicago Monuments Project is beginning with “a discussion.” Without pushback that discussion very well may devolve into moving statues in the wee hours, which is what happened to two Christopher Columbus statues, including the one at the center of the riot, into storage. Both of those statues of the Italian Navigator are on the project’s “under review” status. 

It’s not just social media users and conservative news sources that have objected to the Chicago Monuments Project. In a Chicago Tribune op-ed, Lincoln biographers Sidney Blumenthal and Harold Holzer wrote, “The Orwellian idea of removing Lincoln from Chicago would be as vain as an attempt to erase the history of Chicago itself.”

The editoral board of the Chicago Tribune–paid subscription required–favors keeping the Lincoln stautes.

Lori Lightfoot even weighed in, “But let’s be clear, we’re in the Land of Lincoln, and that’s not going to change.”

But I’d like to explain to you that the other monuments are also worth keeping. Benjamin Franklin owned two slaves but he freed them and he later became an abolititionist. Ulysses S. Grant, when he was under tremendous financial hardship, freed the only slave he owned. Grant of course was the commander of all Union armies in the Civil War. George Washington’s slaves were freed after the death of Martha Washington. Yes, Washington is the Father of our Nation.

Other than being white, I can’t astertain why Marquette and Jolliet, or Leif Erikson, are “under review” in Chicago.

The source of the rage against Lincoln likely comes from his approving the hanging of 38 Dakota warriors in 1862. But Abe commuted 264 Dakota War executions. There were atrocities in that conflict committed by both sides. Here’s what a Norwegian immigrant described in a letter at that time, courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society:

The Indians have begun attacking the farmers. They have already killed a great many people, and many are mutilated in the cruelest manner. Tomahawks and knives have already claimed many victims. Children, less able to defend themselves, are usually burned alive or hanged in the trees, and destruction moves from house to house.

If the Chicago Monuments Project is about education, then it probably means that Lightfoot sorely needs one. “In time, our team will determine there are no monuments to African Americans in this city,” Lightfoot said last summer while announcing what has become the Chicago Monuments Project. “There are no monuments to women. There are no monuments that reflect the contributions of people in the city of Chicago who contributed to the greatness of this city.”

But in her namesake park on the South Side stands a Gwendolyn Brooks statue. Brooks was the first African-American to serve as Illinois’ Poet Laureate. A couple miles north of that statue is the beautiful Victory Monument, which honors a World War I African American regiment, and a bit north of that one is the Monument to the Great Northern Migration. I believe each of these are on city of Chicago or Chicago Park District property.

Does Chicago need more monuments featuring women and minorities? Absolutely. It can also benefit with a Ronald Reagan statue. The Gipper is the only president who was born in Illinois and the first to live in Chicago, although the apartment where he lived as a child was razed by the University of Chicago in 2013.

Click here to view the monuments in question. To express your comments about the Chicago Monuments Project please click here. Please be courteous. And if you Tweet this blog post–please do!–use the #ChicagoMonuments hashtag.

Make your voice heard. They’ve begun to listen.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.


Futility league season 2, SD Jones League season 1 and all time great league season 3 standings (With Wild Card) 2/28/21

Here is the state of the table top baseball leagues I run. All leagues are 162 game seasons with one 3 game series scheduled per week If you click on a team link you can see their stats, injuries, leaders etc.

As of this week I am adding the wild cards standings for the play-in game

League one All Futility League (all teams lost 96 + games) 2nd Season. Scheduled series time Thursday Mornings.

Teams AL Division AWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1970 Milwaukee Brewers4232.568—–NoN/A
1970 Chicago White Sox3936.5203 1/2No—–
2002 Tampa Bay Devil Rays3243.42710 1/2Yes7
2003 Detroit Tigers2946.38713 1/2No10
Teams AL Division BWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1970 Kansas City Royals4431.587—–NoN/A
2008 Seattle Mariners4035.5334Yes+1
2012 Minnesota Twins3936.5205No——
1973 Texas Rangers3045.40014Yes9
Teams AL Division CWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
2009 Cleveland Indians3837.507—–No1*
1957 Washington Senators3837.507—–No1*
2019 Baltimore Orioles3737.5001/2No1 1/2
1967 Kansas City A’s3639.4802No3
*Division Winner automatically makes playoffs
Teams NL Division AWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1998 Montreal Expos4626.639—–NoN/A
2009 Washington Nationals4332.5734 1/2Yes+ 1 1/2
2001 Pittsburgh Pirates 3936.5208 1/2Yes2 1/2
1998 Florida Marlins3342.44014 1/2Yes8 1/2
Teams NL Division BWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
2015 Atlanta Braves3537.486—– Non/a
2017 San Francisco Giants3441.4542 1/2No7 1/2
2012 Houston Astros3441.4542 1/2Yes7 1/2
2000 Philadelphia Phillies3043.4115 1/2Yes10 1/2
Teams NL Division CWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1982 Cincinnati Reds4330.589—-Non/a
1993 New York Mets4032.5562 1/2No—–
1974 Chicago Cubs3636.5006 1/2No4
1993 San Diego Padres3441.45410Yes7 1/2

The SD Jones memorial .500 teams league is a league (all teams were no better than 2 games over .500 or no worse than 2 games under) Initial season . Games are scheduled for Tuesdays. AM

Teams AL EastWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1993 Boston2922.569—–Non/a
1973 New York (A)2325.4794 1/2Yes1 1/2
1967 Washington2028.4177 1/2Yes4 1/2
1957 Baltimore2130.4128Yes5
Teams AL CentralWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
2010 Detroit2919.604—–Yesn/a
1975 Cleveland2423.5114 1/2No—–
1998 Chicago (A)2226.4587 No2 1/2
1973 Minnesota1830.37511No5 1/2
Teams AL WestWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
2017 Kansas City3216.667—–Yesn/a
2010 Oakland2820.5834 Yes+ 3 1/2
2005 Toronto2226.45810 Yes2 1/2
2018 Los Angeles (A)2137.43811Yes3 1/2
Teams NL EastWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
2018 Washington3219.627—-Non/a
1967 Pittsburgh3021.5882No+ 3 1/2
1975 New York (N)2523.5215 1/2Yes——
1957 Philadelphia2526.4907Yes1 1/2
Teams NL CentralWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1975 St. Louis2325479—–Yesn/a
1996 Cincinnati2225.4681/2No2 1/2
2000 Colorado2226.4581Yes3
1973 Houston2028.4173Yes5
Teams NL WestWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1975 San Francisco3612.750—–Yesn/a
2012 Arizona2127.43815Yes4
2007 Los Angeles (N)2028.41716Yes5
1982 San Diego1932.37318 1/2Yes7 1/2

3rd League All time any time Great Teams League (3rd season) Games scheduled Friday evenings

Teams AL EastWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1970 Baltimore156.714—–Yesn/a
1993 Toronto1110.5244No+ 1/2
1999 Boston711.3896 1/2No2
1961 Yankess711.3896 1/2No2
Teams AL CentralWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
2010 Texas126.667—–Yesn/a
1954 Cleveland810.4444Yes1
1974 Oakland69.4004 1/2Yes1 1/2
2006 Detroit612.3336Yes3
Teams AL OtherWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1924 Washington138.619—–Non/a
1977 Kansas City99.5002 1/2Yes—-
1967 Minnesota1011.4763Yes1/2
2009 New York (A)510.3335No4
Teams NL EastWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1975 Cincinnati108.556—–Yesn/a
1998 Atlanta1011.4761 1/2No1 1/2
2019 Washington Nats1011.4761 1/2Yes1 1/2
1955 Brooklyn810.4442 Yes2
Teams NL CentralWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
1957 Milwaukee117.611—–Yesn/a
1971 Pittsburgh108.5561 Yes—-
1985 St. Louis810.4443No2
2003 Cubs711.3894Yes3
Teams NL OtherWLPCTGBAvailableWCGB
2016 Chicago (N)135722—-Non/a
2001 Arizona117.6112Yes+1
1977 Philadelphia99.5004Yes1
2007 Colorado612.3337Yes4

If you are interested in taking over the management of any of these teams contact me in comments.

Sports report

With the Super Bowl finally over, the football season has officially come to an end, and the really exciting part of the year has begun – the off-season. This year’s off-season promises to be among the most thrilling yet, with scads of the sport’s top players at the most important position, quarterback, becoming free agents or demanding trades. Not only that, but the surest thing in sure-thing history, the kid from Clemson — he’s pretty tall, has long hair, acts polite, remember that guy? — is coming out of college early to join the league. It’s all very exciting.

Will the Dallas Cowboys be able to re-sign their star quarterback, whose name escapes me at the moment? Only wildcat owner Pete “Lasso” Priscoe knows for sure, and the ol’ oilman ain’t giving any hints which way he’ll go. We’ll have to keep a sharp eye on the old cowboy to get any sense if he’ll win the off-season.

Meanwhile, down the road apiece in New Orleans, the Saints’ legendary quarterback, guaranteed first-ballot Hall of Famer, you know the dude, white guy, looks kind of normal, brown hair, balding — anyway, looks like he’s set to retire or something, so the coast is clear for General Manager Sonny “Just a Po’ Boy” Boudreaux to make some major moves. No getting around it, though – the cap’s got Sonny hogtied to some degree, so it’s going to take some dandy maneuvers for him to be able to sign the players he’s going to need to stay in the hunt for the off-season title. We’ll have to keep a sharp eye on the Po’ Boy over at the Superdome.

And don’t sleep on New England.  The Patriots’ main man, Coach Billy “Grumpa” Bells, who calls all the shots in Beantown, should be on the lookout for a new signal caller. The one he had, the one from Carolina who replaced the one guy who went down to Tamp Bay, he’s probably gone, so Grumpa will no doubt make some major offers this off-season. He might even trade a player or two, which would really show the skills you need to make it in the NFL these days. Best to keep a sharp eye out on ol’ Grumpa.

So good luck to all these major players.  Professional athletics requires not only the highest negotiating and contract drafting skills, but also the cold-hearted business sense to trade away or cut a popular player when the off-season hangs in the balance. We can only marvel as we watch these wizards go to work. Go team!

The Left Proves Archbishop Chaput’s Maxim Correct

To those who are shocked SHOCKED by the left sudden love of censorship from books and movies on Amazon to tweets to people let me remind you of Archbishop Chaput’s maxim concerning evil:

Evil preaches tolerance until it is dominant, then it tries to silence good.

Remember it’s never been about justice it’s always been about power and if you’re a leftist who actually believed these folks thought otherwise, well the more fool you.

Meanwhile the left will keep finding new things to censor and new people to cancel if there is any hint that said person is a threat to them or their benefactors who pay them their using the tax base as their personal slush fund.

#unexpectedly of course

What’s in YOUR wallet?

Most Americans are going to get a small influx of money in the next 60 days, due to two separate events. First, the 1.9 trillion dollar COVID-19 bill that is 90% about bailing out Democrat-supporting regions of the country will include some sort of stimulus checks, likely the $1400 per individual. Also, most people are filing their taxes between now and April, and most Americans will get some sort of refund on their taxes.

The thing is, most of this money gets spent without thinking about future consequences. The local used car dealerships always run “sales” this time of year that mention tax returns, and I’m seeing “stimulus check” sales advertisements popping up now. Yet we’re not going into happy times anytime soon. If you watch the stock market and references by the Fed that indicate inflation is going to come roaring back should give us pause.

If you’re not one to care about the Fed, then look more locally. Wood prices at Lowes and Home Depot are well double what they were a year ago, between the boom in home building due to low interest rates and COVID-19 shutting down the lumber mills for a time. Gas is more expensive now. I’ve had more Amazon packages getting delivered late than ever before. Stores are still running out of basic items, and while this is infrequent now, remember that is essentially never happened in the past.

All this indicates we’re in for a bumpy ride for at least two years, if not four. I’m not going to get caught unprepared for this, and you shouldn’t either. I suggest you prioritize spending this way:

  1. Debt. Get rid of any debt you can. Car almost paid off? Pay it off now. Credit card debts? Pay them off or work a forgiveness plan, an especially good idea now since card companies are also taking advantage of low interest rates.
    I would also refinance your house if you haven’t done so. Most people can’t simply pay off their mortgage, but you can make a principle payment to pay it off earlier, and shifting to bi-weekly payments (if your company allows you to) will cut years off the back end.
  2. Build up supplies. COVID-19 taught us that everything from toilet paper to sweet potatoes will be in short supply. It’s going to happen again. Rather than fight lines at a store, build up a 1-3 month supply of basics that don’t really ever go bad: bottled water, paper products, disposable eating utensils, soap and cleaning supplies. You should also keep about 2 weeks of meals in reserve. I have things like spaghetti and frozen foods that can keep for a long time just hanging out. They occasionally save me when dinner decides to catch on fire, and when the stores were swamped in the initial stages of pandemic, this food let me stretch our groceries further.
  3. Fix what you can. Americans are pretty handy people, but we also can be lazy. Plenty of homes and vehicles have little things that need repair. Get those done now. Don’t wait forever on car maintenance. The pandemic backed our local dealership up by a month for appointments. Same goes for home maintenance, even if you do it yourself, you may not get the supplies when people buy out the stores.
  4. Set your investing on automatic. Unless you’re smart on the stock market, you’re best off making long term investments on mutual funds. Whatever your investing strategy, put it on automatic through automatic funds transfers and investments. Too many people get scared when the market comes down and sell, which is the worst time to do that. Putting it on cruise control helps you take advantage of the down market over time.
  5. Build up your local network. This may not cost much money, but its critical. Do you know your neighbors? Do you know a local electrician, plumber, car mechanic and veterinarian? Remember how even routine house calls for minor issues became a major problem in the pandemic? You avoid this by knowing local people. Now is the time to get to know them and be on good terms, so when you need their help in a pinch, you can get it.

Don’t throw your stimulus to the wind! Set yourself up now to get through the trying times ahead.

This post represents the views of the author and not those of the Department of Defense, Department of the Navy, or any other government agency.