The Amish edge

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The Amish edge

Con­sid­er­ing we went through the same thing here I really feel for the peo­ple in Ken­tucky who are still with­out power and that no mat­ter what the Today show said tues­day has had a slow Fema response and been rather ignored by the Obama administration.

The most inter­est­ing story I’ve seen on this is here:

When the wind died down and the ice storm had passed, Joe Stutz­man gath­ered his spare lanterns and stepped out of his Amish farm­house to lend them to his modern-​living neighbors.

I feel sorry for my neigh­bors who were used to elec­tric­ity and all of a sud­den didn’t have it,” Stutz­man said. “I know that must be hard for them.”

Hun­dreds of thou­sands of peo­ple in Ken­tucky have been with­out elec­tric­ity for their lights, fur­naces, ovens and refrig­er­a­tors since the killer storm hit more than a week ago, and some spots might not get power back for weeks.

But Kentucky’s Amish have been liv­ing that way all their lives. And when the dis­as­ter struck, they gen­er­ously lent a hand to their non-​Amish neigh­bors and showed them how it’s done.

The money quote is right here:

Stutz­man, his wife and their seven chil­dren were secure in their toasty, two-​story home amid corn and soy­bean fields and swampy stands of cypress in west­ern Kentucky.

We paid it no atten­tion,” Stutz­man said Tues­day, relax­ing in a hand­made rocker as a wood stove across the room radi­ated heat on a windy morn­ing with tem­per­a­tures in the low 20s.

Take that Weird Al!

Considering we went through the same thing here I really feel for the people in Kentucky who are still without power and that no matter what the Today show said tuesday has had a slow Fema response and been rather ignored by the Obama administration.

The most interesting story I’ve seen on this is here:

When the wind died down and the ice storm had passed, Joe Stutzman gathered his spare lanterns and stepped out of his Amish farmhouse to lend them to his modern-living neighbors.

“I feel sorry for my neighbors who were used to electricity and all of a sudden didn’t have it,” Stutzman said. “I know that must be hard for them.”

Hundreds of thousands of people in Kentucky have been without electricity for their lights, furnaces, ovens and refrigerators since the killer storm hit more than a week ago, and some spots might not get power back for weeks.

But Kentucky’s Amish have been living that way all their lives. And when the disaster struck, they generously lent a hand to their non-Amish neighbors and showed them how it’s done.

The money quote is right here:

Stutzman, his wife and their seven children were secure in their toasty, two-story home amid corn and soybean fields and swampy stands of cypress in western Kentucky.

“We paid it no attention,” Stutzman said Tuesday, relaxing in a handmade rocker as a wood stove across the room radiated heat on a windy morning with temperatures in the low 20s.

Take that Weird Al!