Obama the Nixonian

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Obama the Nixonian

You know it took decades for Nixon to get his rep­u­ta­tion as a liar. This pres­i­dent is man­ag­ing it pretty quick.

You might recall can­di­date Obama promised to use pub­lic fund­ing. That was a lie.

The con­gress had voted to allow 48 hours before the vote took place, democ­rats refused, a lie:

Instapun­dit reminds us of the promise to not write leg­is­la­tion behind closed doors. A lie.

Hotair reminds us that Pres­i­dent Obama promised that there would be a 5 day com­ment period before sign­ing a bill. He is plan­ning to sign it tomor­row. If he does it will again be a lie.

And don’t for­get the ren­di­tion dis­cus­sion, a mat­ter impor­tant to the left.

Don’t for­get the Cater­pil­lar plant dou­ble speak either.

Nick Guar­iglia asks why any­one is the slight­est bit sur­prised:

What could any­one have pos­si­bly expected from a young, overtly left­ist Chicago upstart who had accom­plished pre­cisely noth­ing of sig­nif­i­cance through­out his short career — and yet still promised the world, and more, to his loyal adherents?

Con­sider his cam­paign pledges: It wasn’t too long ago that Obama promised to “tell the cor­po­rate lob­by­ists that their days of set­ting the agenda in Wash­ing­ton are over.” Ah, the cor­po­rate lob­by­ist, every candidate’s favorite whip­ping boy. “They have not funded my cam­paign, they will not run my White House, and they will not drown out the voices of the Amer­i­can peo­ple when I am pres­i­dent,” Barack once swore to his sea of idol­iz­ing worshipers.

That was then; this is now. Pres­i­dent Obama has allowed sev­en­teen excep­tions to the no-​lobbyist rule. And remem­ber that “sun­light before sign­ing” pledge, giv­ing cit­i­zens enough time to read a bill — and offer their opin­ions on it — before it is signed into law? Well, that’s gone to the way­side, too.

I for­got the lob­by­ist promise, his conclusion:

Dur­ing last year’s cam­paign, crit­ics of Barack Obama con­tended he was too inex­pe­ri­enced, too left­ist, and in a sense, too good to be true. He was, we observed, just another politi­cian — in fact, one uniquely entrenched with Chicago cor­rup­tion and archaic tax-​and-​spend philoso­phies. In other words, a less noble Jimmy Carter.

My take: I think you could see who this guy was a mile away and peo­ple just didn’t want to see it. So as always we get the gov­ern­ment we deserve.

UPDATE: Sweet­ness and Light lists 7 bro­ken promises.

You know it took decades for Nixon to get his reputation as a liar. This president is managing it pretty quick.

You might recall candidate Obama promised to use public funding. That was a lie.

The congress had voted to allow 48 hours before the vote took place, democrats refused, a lie:

Instapundit reminds us of the promise to not write legislation behind closed doors. A lie.

Hotair reminds us that President Obama promised that there would be a 5 day comment period before signing a bill. He is planning to sign it tomorrow. If he does it will again be a lie.

And don’t forget the rendition discussion, a matter important to the left.

Don’t forget the Caterpillar plant double speak either.

Nick Guariglia asks why anyone is the slightest bit surprised:

What could anyone have possibly expected from a young, overtly leftist Chicago upstart who had accomplished precisely nothing of significance throughout his short career — and yet still promised the world, and more, to his loyal adherents?

Consider his campaign pledges: It wasn’t too long ago that Obama promised to “tell the corporate lobbyists that their days of setting the agenda in Washington are over.” Ah, the corporate lobbyist, every candidate’s favorite whipping boy. “They have not funded my campaign, they will not run my White House, and they will not drown out the voices of the American people when I am president,” Barack once swore to his sea of idolizing worshipers.

That was then; this is now. President Obama has allowed seventeen exceptions to the no-lobbyist rule. And remember that “sunlight before signing” pledge, giving citizens enough time to read a bill — and offer their opinions on it — before it is signed into law? Well, that’s gone to the wayside, too.

I forgot the lobbyist promise, his conclusion:

During last year’s campaign, critics of Barack Obama contended he was too inexperienced, too leftist, and in a sense, too good to be true. He was, we observed, just another politician — in fact, one uniquely entrenched with Chicago corruption and archaic tax-and-spend philosophies. In other words, a less noble Jimmy Carter.

My take: I think you could see who this guy was a mile away and people just didn’t want to see it. So as always we get the government we deserve.

UPDATE: Sweetness and Light lists 7 broken promises.