Count Me Out of the 9/11 Perspectives, Thank You

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Count Me Out of the 9/11 Perspectives, Thank You

Cross posted at the Con­ser­va­tory:

This Sun­day will be the 10th Anniver­sary of the 911 attacks.

All over your TV, all over the news­pa­pers, and all over the web, peo­ple will be talk­ing about how much the day means, remem­ber­ing the dead, and hold­ing them­selves in gen­eral mourning.

Not me.

Is it because I don’t think 911 was sig­nif­i­cant? Balder­dash — it was the most suc­cess­ful ter­ror attack on the U.S. in history.

Is it because I want to “move on”? Non­sense — this attack high­lighted the threat of rad­i­cal Islam, and I think that is one of the most seri­ous threats fac­ing the entire world. Mov­ing on is not only a bad option, it is a blind option.

It’s just this.

Other than the actions of the pas­sen­gers on Flight 93 over Penn­syl­va­nia, 911 was the most seri­ous defeat we suf­fered dur­ing the War on Ter­ror. It was a cause for cel­e­bra­tion in many parts of the Arab world. I still have not for­got­ten the fes­tiv­i­ties in the “Pales­tin­ian” areas that were recorded before Arafat, ter­ri­fied of U.S. reac­tion, sup­pressed the report­ing of them. The series of events made Bin Laden a hero to many in the rad­i­cal Islamic world (and to some in the West­ern world, as well). Time and death have not changed that status.

By dwelling on and beat­ing our breasts over one of the worst defeats in U.S. his­tory, all we do is embolden and encour­age our foes at a time when they are reg­u­larly being defeated in the field. They have lit­tle rea­son to cheer, and yet every somber event that takes place while the war is still being fought will lend them hope at a time when we should be giv­ing them only grief.

The days we need to be remem­ber­ing are the fall of Sad­dam (April 9th); the fall of the Tal­iban gov­ern­ment in Afghanistan and Tora Bora (Dec 17th); and the death of Bin Laden (May 2nd). We should hold those days high, and make sure that not only do we remem­ber and cel­e­brate those days — but those we defeated remem­ber it as well. Those days should be cel­e­brated just as we did with VE and VJ Days, right up until the great­est gen­er­a­tion was replaced by the baby boomers, and those World War II land­marks began to fade from memory.

When the war is won, then per­haps things will be dif­fer­ent — but as long as we are still fight­ing, a somber remem­brance is the wrong thing to do.

So while the rest of the coun­try puts on their sack­cloth for 24 hours, I will respect­fully pass on that. Instead, I will pop a cork to the pas­sen­gers of Flight 93 for pro­duc­ing the first in many U.S. vic­to­ries dur­ing the War on Ter­ror and toast the troops who con­tinue to win one of the tough­est wars our coun­try has ever fought.

Update: This (via Glenn) is excel­lent:

The peo­ple whose feel­ings on that day would inter­est me most are too busy mon­i­tor­ing the reac­tors on sub­marines, play­ing swap-​a-​tronics in the elec­tronic guts of a JSTARS, or shoot­ing smelly ter­ror­ists in the face to go pose for the cam­eras in NYC.

Cross posted at the Conservatory:

This Sunday will be the 10th Anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

All over your TV, all over the newspapers, and all over the web, people will be talking about how much the day means, remembering the dead, and holding themselves in general mourning.

Not me.

Is it because I don’t think 9/11 was significant? Balderdash—it was the most successful terror attack on the U.S. in history.

Is it because I want to “move on”? Nonsense—this attack highlighted the threat of radical Islam, and I think that is one of the most serious threats facing the entire world. Moving on is not only a bad option, it is a blind option.

It’s just this.

Other than the actions of the passengers on Flight 93 over Pennsylvania, 9/11 was the most serious defeat we suffered during the War on Terror. It was a cause for celebration in many parts of the Arab world. I still have not forgotten the festivities in the “Palestinian” areas that were recorded before Arafat, terrified of U.S. reaction, suppressed the reporting of them. The series of events made Bin Laden a hero to many in the radical Islamic world (and to some in the Western world, as well). Time and death have not changed that status.

By dwelling on and beating our breasts over one of the worst defeats in U.S. history, all we do is embolden and encourage our foes at a time when they are regularly being defeated in the field. They have little reason to cheer, and yet every somber event that takes place while the war is still being fought will lend them hope at a time when we should be giving them only grief.

The days we need to be remembering are the fall of Saddam (April 9th); the fall of the Taliban government in Afghanistan and Tora Bora (Dec 17th); and the death of Bin Laden (May 2nd). We should hold those days high, and make sure that not only do we remember and celebrate those days—but those we defeated remember it as well. Those days should be celebrated just as we did with VE and VJ Days, right up until the greatest generation was replaced by the baby boomers, and those World War II landmarks began to fade from memory.

When the war is won, then perhaps things will be different—but as long as we are still fighting, a somber remembrance is the wrong thing to do.

So while the rest of the country puts on their sackcloth for 24 hours, I will respectfully pass on that. Instead, I will pop a cork to the passengers of Flight 93 for producing the first in many U.S. victories during the War on Terror and toast the troops who continue to win one of the toughest wars our country has ever fought.

Update: This (via Glenn) is excellent:

The people whose feelings on that day would interest me most are too busy monitoring the reactors on submarines, playing swap-a-tronics in the electronic guts of a JSTARS, or shooting smelly terrorists in the face to go pose for the cameras in NYC.