A quick parenthood lesson

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A quick parenthood lesson

J. D. Cahill: (To his son approach­ing the “dead” Frasier) Hold it! (Draws pis­tol and shoots twice near Frasier’s head)

Frasier: (Jump­ing up) You’d even shoot a dead man!

J. D. Cahill: No and I ain’t gonna let him shoot me either.

Cahill U.S. Mar­shall 1973

Yes­ter­day I touched on the idea that par­ents should be less inter­ested in being friends and more inter­ested in being par­ents. Today I have a basic les­son on how it’s done.

My son missed his bus yes­ter­day and I ended up dri­ving him to school, drop­ping him off at the front door.

Around 10 a.m. I got a call from the school say­ing he was on the “Absent” list. I expressed sur­prise say­ing I dropped him off right at the front door albeit late. The vice prin­ci­pal explained that there is a new sys­tem whereby stu­dents have to report to the “tardy table” if they are even slightly late so if he went straight to class he would still be on the list.

Now most peo­ple would have left it at that, but I asked the VP a favor: Would he could check which class my son was sup­posed to be in and make sure that he was there? Not that I sus­pected he wouldn’t be but it would take just a few min­utes to con­firm it. Sure enough a I got a call back, he was where he belonged.

My son is a good kid and to my knowl­edge hasn’t bagged school in the past, but thanks to that visit and call­back if one of his friends wants to talk him into it; he knows in the back of his mind that I’m watch­ing.

If you are the type of par­ent who might feel guilty about seem­ing “dis­trust­ing” their kid that way or wor­ried about the reac­tion later, then you need to toughen up, fast.

J. D. Cahill: (To his son approaching the “dead” Frasier) Hold it! (Draws pistol and shoots twice near Frasier’s head)

Frasier: (Jumping up) You’d even shoot a dead man!

J. D. Cahill: No and I ain’t gonna let him shoot me either.

Cahill U.S. Marshall 1973

Yesterday I touched on the idea that parents should be less interested in being friends and more interested in being parents. Today I have a basic lesson on how it’s done.

My son missed his bus yesterday and I ended up driving him to school, dropping him off at the front door.

Around 10 a.m. I got a call from the school saying he was on the “Absent” list. I expressed surprise saying I dropped him off right at the front door albeit late. The vice principal explained that there is a new system whereby students have to report to the “tardy table” if they are even slightly late so if he went straight to class he would still be on the list.

Now most people would have left it at that, but I asked the VP a favor: Would he could check which class my son was supposed to be in and make sure that he was there? Not that I suspected he wouldn’t be but it would take just a few minutes to confirm it. Sure enough a I got a call back, he was where he belonged.

My son is a good kid and to my knowledge hasn’t bagged school in the past, but thanks to that visit and callback if one of his friends wants to talk him into it; he knows in the back of his mind that I’m watching.

If you are the type of parent who might feel guilty about seeming “distrusting” their kid that way or worried about the reaction later, then you need to toughen up, fast.