Kwanzza a Cultural failure for the left

Readability

Kwanzza a Cultural failure for the left

In part of the old British Empire it is Box­ing day, but in Berkley and places like that today is the start of Kwanzza.

I had no inten­tion of writ­ing about Kwanzza this year, like the slightly older Fes­tivus it is a totally invented hol­i­day and the one time I did write about it con­cerned it’s grow­ing irrel­e­vance:

Whether it’s gone because nobody knew how to sell it, or because nobody wanted to buy it, Kwan­zaa is now nowhere to be found.

That was from a Huff po arti­cle I wouldn’t even write about it today but I was tweeted an arti­cle about Kwan­zaa today by Adisa Ban­joko that really is the final stake through the heart:

I did par­tic­i­pate in a few Kwan­zaa events back when ’89 was the num­ber. I always tried to do observe it. But once I did the his­tory on its founder and some of the deeper ele­ments of its hol­low cul­tural base, it was hard to con­tinue on. For those who do, I promise I’m not mad at you. Not that you would care. But you can’t get your kente cloth all in a bunch because I’m not feel­ing it.

Look, I love Africa and what it means to be Black. I love almost every­thing African (aside from the tribal fight­ing and the need­less mur­der and rape of women across the con­ti­nent). But Kwan­zaa is not African. I never knew an African (from any part of the con­ti­nent) who was like “Yo Adisa, bro you wanna slide thought to the Kwan­zaa fest playa?” It has never hap­pened! They don’t get down like that.

Kwan­zaa is like a bad weave. Peo­ple might kinda like it, but we all know it ain’t real. Now, I live on the West coast, in the Bay Area. The only peo­ple I see really on some Kwan­zaa “ish” are the hard­core rev­o­lu­tion­ary types you might find at the Berke­ley flea mar­ket sell­ing incense and shea but­ter soap

I remem­ber when the MSM pushed Kwanzza like there was no tomor­row, this piece is the only one I’ve seen on the sub­ject on the net dur­ing my reg­u­lar surf­ing, and I haven’t seen a sin­gle thing on TV con­cern­ing it, not one.

The truth is Kwanzza was always about cre­at­ing a social­ist alter­na­tive to Christ­mas the one hol­i­day the sec­u­lar­ists would love to co-​opt. The fail­ure of that attempt is so huge that I’ll wager there are more peo­ple at mass today for the feast of St. Stephen the first mar­tyr than cel­e­brat­ing Kwanzza.

But hey if you want to cel­e­brate Kwanzza go ahead and enjoy it and my best to you.

In part of the old British Empire it is Boxing day, but in Berkley and places like that today is the start of Kwanzza.

I had no intention of writing about Kwanzza this year, like the slightly older Festivus it is a totally invented holiday and the one time I did write about it concerned it’s growing irrelevance:

Whether it’s gone because nobody knew how to sell it, or because nobody wanted to buy it, Kwanzaa is now nowhere to be found.

That was from a Huff po article I wouldn’t even write about it today but I was tweeted an article about Kwanzaa today by Adisa Banjoko that really is the final stake through the heart:

I did participate in a few Kwanzaa events back when ’89 was the number. I always tried to do observe it. But once I did the history on its founder and some of the deeper elements of its hollow cultural base, it was hard to continue on. For those who do, I promise I’m not mad at you. Not that you would care. But you can’t get your kente cloth all in a bunch because I’m not feeling it.

Look, I love Africa and what it means to be Black. I love almost everything African (aside from the tribal fighting and the needless murder and rape of women across the continent). But Kwanzaa is not African. I never knew an African (from any part of the continent) who was like “Yo Adisa, bro you wanna slide thought to the Kwanzaa fest playa?” It has never happened! They don’t get down like that.

Kwanzaa is like a bad weave. People might kinda like it, but we all know it ain’t real. Now, I live on the West coast, in the Bay Area. The only people I see really on some Kwanzaa “ish” are the hardcore revolutionary types you might find at the Berkeley flea market selling incense and shea butter soap

I remember when the MSM pushed Kwanzza like there was no tomorrow, this piece is the only one I’ve seen on the subject on the net during my regular surfing, and I haven’t seen a single thing on TV concerning it, not one.

The truth is Kwanzza was always about creating a socialist alternative to Christmas the one holiday the secularists would love to co-opt. The failure of that attempt is so huge that I’ll wager there are more people at mass today for the feast of St. Stephen the first martyr than celebrating Kwanzza.

But hey if you want to celebrate Kwanzza go ahead and enjoy it and my best to you.