Hey Guess what Charlie Crist decided he now believes as of yesterday:

Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, who throughout his long political career has been staunchly pro-gun rights, said Wednesday that after the Connecticut school slayings, he now backs controls

That quite a switch but the explanation is simple:

Crist recently became a Democrat and is considering a challenge to Gov. Rick Scott, who long has favored gun rights. Scott has refused to comment on gun measures after the Connecticut shootings, saying it is too early to debate.

Javier Manjarres is not amused

Is there a phonier political opportunist in the country than Charlie Crist?

A reminder the NRSC endorsed Charlie Crist 15 months before the senate primary after which he left the party and eventually joined the Democrats, but until that moment the GOP Establishment sure loved Charlie and that love had more than a political cost:

During a single three-month span of that year, Republicans contributed $4.3 million to the doomed campaign of Charlie Crist.

How’s that workin’ out for ya?

and that money was not only lost it terms of what was done, but in terms of what could have been done: Jimmie Bise:

Divide $500,000 into $4.3 million. That’s how long I could run a hypothetical conservative news site with the money dunderheaded conservatives gave Charlie Crist in just three months.

On the other hand let me remind of a poll that the GOP Establishment didn’t have any use for, a fellow named Rick Santorum. I remember (and videoed) him saying this in New Hampshire:

America is a melting pot, not a salad bowl. America is a set of values by which we hold together. That’s what holds us together, but there is a different point of view. Some have suggested that no America shouldn’t be and is wrong to be, one thing. It needs to be many things. It needs to be what any everybody wants to do. Out of one many. If that’s the case then is anybody surprised that we have trouble getting anything done for the one, the country?

Lisa Graas yesterday reminded of these words before the DeMoins Register saying this:

But as Rick Santorum told the editorial board of the Des Moines Register back during the primary, most politicians think of the issues as “little silos” and if one of the “silos” is not popular, the politician can just kick that silo down and take a new position. He sees “the big picture” of where our rights come from, and the very limited role of our government in defending only those rights.

I come back to Santorum’s answer on Gay Marriage in Concord NH against a Hostile College Crowd, he didn’t duck, he didn’t flip he explained and educated:

The GOP Establishment didn’t like Rick Santorum, they didn’t like his willingness to talk on key issues, he didn’t duck, dodge or hide. That scared them. Mitt Romney didn’t scare them or the consultants they invested in. The GOP established sure liked Mitt Romney…

…..right up until the day he lost.

Perhaps conservatives should consider a different set of investments, rather than enriching consultants by spending on pols who are so changeable we should invest in selling our ideas to the people they would benefit:

the only hope to go to the people.

Go to the Latinos and Black Americans, explain WHY conservative economics work for them. Explain why an open border hurts THEM and theirs and explain why the entitlement society makes them peons and slaves to the state as sure as if they were in the plantations of South America or the old South.

Go to women explain WHY not only conservative economics works for them but WHY conservatism in social issues benefits them, their children and themselves.

Let Americans know that WHY a strong America makes them safer than a weak one, make the case and do it every single day.

That is a better investment than any dollar to any superpac

This is what new media does, as Stacy McCain put it

For the $4 million that the permatanned RINO Charlie Crist collected during that single three-month span of 2009, you could fund eight spiffy little New Media operations for a year (or four such operations for two years). And FEC contribution limits do not apply to people making “investments” in news operations, so that the rich Republicans would not be restricted in their generosity toward New Media, as they are toward political candidates.

Why is a Media Matters & Think Progress or even a Brett Kimberlin funded? How does the left manage to push this agenda from the web to the MSM and why do they succeed? because as Stacy McCain put it

Soros has figured this out. Rich Republicans have not.

Guys it’s time to figure it out.

Update: NRSC not NRCC corrected

One of the things I’ve noticed over time is one a republican is no longer a threat to democrats electorally the media suddenly finds nice things to say.

At the New Republic we see this process up close.

Before the hearings, Robert Bork had been renowned at Yale Law School, where he taught for nearly two decades, not only for his influence on antitrust and constitutional law, but for his ideological open-mindedness: many students of his era fondly remember the seminar he co-taught with his closest friend on the faculty, the liberal constitutional scholar (and TNR legal editor) Alexander Bickel, which featured affectionate bipartisan debates. After Bickel criticized his conservative jurisprudence in one class, Bork replied, “You’ll notice that my colleague’s elegant theories of jurisprudence are a cross between Edmund Burke and Fiddler on the Roof.” TNR was said to be Bork’s favorite journal at the time, and in 1968 he wrote a piece for this magazine, “Why I Am for Nixon,” praising the Republican presidential candidate as the true heir of classical liberalism.

As soon as Robert Bork became a “threat” to the left it was necessary and proper for good Catholics like Ted Kennedy and Joe Biden to destroy him and his reputation if they could.

Yet Bork remained the man he was.

After the hearings, he would become, in print at least, something of the caricature of legal conservatism that Kennedy had painted. But he remained friendly and convivial in private: Whenever I ran into him and his devoted wife, Mary Ellen, over the years at holiday sing-alongs, he loved to discuss his old friend Bickel over scotch. Although the hearings had left Bork professionally embittered, he remained personally gracious.

I suspect many of the left who knew that Bork was a better man than they pretended he was. All of these people who could have done something or said something at a time when it would have meant something will unburden themselves of the guilt and they will feel better about themselves.

The world will now hear about Robert Bork the good republican, but only because he is Robert Bork the dead republican.