Who knew blue states were doing so well?

by Datechguy | March 21st, 2013

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Who knew blue states were doing so well?

One of the basic rules of eco­nom­ics is sup­ply and demand.

If there is an exces­sive quan­tity of an item its rel­a­tive value drops, this applies not just to basic prod­ucts and ser­vices, but to things such as the money supply.

Like­wise if you have an item in short sup­ply, it because more valu­able and the holder of that valu­able item, com­mod­ity or ser­vice can pick and choose among offers to their advantage.

This is true of jobs. Jobs are a valu­able com­mod­ity, employ­ers pro­duce tax rev­enue, pay for infra­struc­ture and allow pro­duces to be pro­duced in an area but most of all they attract the most valu­able com­mod­ity of all, people.

Now I’ve been led to under­stand that there has been a short­age of jobs around this coun­try over the last 4 years, but appar­ently I’ve been mis­taken. Because in state after state we see the elected gov­ern­ments decid­ing they are a com­mod­ity that doesn’t need to be attracted.

Mass­a­chu­setts:

Shrug­ging off the fis­cal cau­tion of recent years, Gov­er­nor Deval Patrick pro­posed a $1.9 bil­lion tax increase tonight in his State of the Com­mon­wealth address, say­ing it was nec­es­sary for the state to invest more in edu­ca­tion and the state’s trans­porta­tion net­work to “accel­er­ate growth and expand opportunity.”

Who knew Mass­a­chu­setts was doing so well they didn’t need to attract jobs? Who knew that peo­ple like my old­est son, about to grad­u­ate from Col­lege in May after 4 solid years on the deans list, with decades of earn­ing poten­tial ahead of him is so com­mon we can tax him by the mile.

And the good times are not restricted to the bay state.

Maine:

P.A.T. Prod­ucts, an inter­na­tional dis­trib­u­tor of spe­cialty chem­i­cals, plas­tic and raw mate­ri­als, has been based in Ban­gor for 39 years.

Leo Coyle, the company’s founder and pres­i­dent, told the Ban­gor Daily News he is mov­ing the company’s cor­po­rate head­quar­ters to the Pease Inter­na­tional Trade­port in Portsmouth, N.H., because of that state’s more attrac­tive tax struc­ture and to be closer to his markets.

39 years in Maine, why move now?

I’m not try­ing to bash Maine,” he said, adding that it’s a great place to raise chil­dren. But dur­ing his 40 years liv­ing in the state, he said he has become frus­trated by what he sees as Maine’s atti­tude toward busi­ness and industry.

Until the state of Maine gets their act together, there’ll be more and more and more peo­ple leav­ing. I’ve been watch­ing it for 40-​plus years. What do I see? I see peo­ple say­ing they can’t take it any­more. I’m not alone,”

Who knew Maine was doing so well they could spare him? Lets be fair, the leg­is­la­ture has done all it can to keep him in Maine, how­ever that leg­is­la­ture has been the newly elected Demo­c­rat leg­is­la­ture of…

…New Hamp­shire:

Lately they have been doing their best to keep com­pa­nies there in all kinds of ways…

Tobacco Taxes

So the New Hamp­shire House just passed a bill to tack on another 0.20 cents a pack.

This ‘rev­enue’ will be extracted from pre­dom­i­nantly mid­dle and lower income peo­ple, but the left has an excuse.

Boat Taxes

With the less­ened taxes: Based on the rates sched­uled to go into effect on July 1, 2015, the Depart­ment states rev­enue pro­duced per fis­cal year would be $1,529,580. Yes, this is the Repub­li­can law
With the Demo­c­rat tax hike: Based on the cur­rent num­ber of ves­sel reg­is­tra­tions, the Depart­ment states the fees in effect pro­duce $3,059,160 of rev­enue per fis­cal year.

Fuel Oil:

By vote of 186 to 165 the Demo­c­rat con­trolled New Hamp­shire House passed a 25% increase in New Hampshire’s fuel oil tax.

A “county income tax

Tomor­row there is a hear­ing (10am – LOB 301) for HB 330. HB 330 would allow any county del­e­ga­tion in New Hamp­shire to adopt a ‘County Income tax’ to be admin­is­tered by the New Hamp­shire Depart­ment of Rev­enue Administration

And of course a gas tax

All of us are, or should be, con­cerned over the neces­sity of the $1 bil­lion gas tax increase in HB 617. Many of us are look­ing for an alter­na­tive that will address the require­ment that we main­tain our high­ways and bridges while avoid­ing what appar­ently would be the biggest tax increase in New Hamp­shire history.

And all of that is after only 5 months of Demo­c­rat control!

Who knew that in this short period of time New Hamp­shire has become such a strong state that they don’t need all those busi­ness and peo­ple from Maine Mass­a­chu­setts, Ver­mont, Rhode Island, and New York to con­sider relo­cat­ing in New Hamp­shire in the future?

And such pros­per­ity isn’t lim­ited to the east. Let’s look west to…

Col­orado

Col­orado is in such good shape Gov Hick­en­looper he can afford to sign this

Colorado’s gov­er­nor signed bills Wednes­day that place new restric­tions on firearms, sig­nal­ing a change for Democ­rats who have tra­di­tion­ally shied away from gun con­trol in a state with a pio­neer tra­di­tion of gun own­er­ship and self-​reliance

even though it leads to this

Ammu­ni­tion mag­a­zine man­u­fac­turer Mag­pul Indus­tries said it plans to begin leav­ing Col­orado “almost imme­di­ately,” and other firms may fol­low suit in the wake of a new law that lim­its ammu­ni­tion mag­a­zine capacities.

Our mov­ing efforts are under­way,” Mag­pul chief oper­at­ing offi­cer Doug Smith said Wednes­day. “Within the next 30 days we will man­u­fac­ture our first mag­a­zine out­side the state of Colorado.”

Who knew Col­orado was doing so well they could spare busi­nesses like Mag­pul and Lawrence Tool & Molding…

We’re basi­cally going to fol­low Mag­pul and do our best to con­tinue being a sup­plier for them,” said Lloyd Lawrence, owner of Denver-​based Lawrence Tool & Mold­ing. “It will prob­a­bly be out of state.”

Lawrence said about 50 to 60 per­cent of his busi­ness comes from sup­ply­ing mag­a­zine parts to Magpul.

and Alfred Man­u­fac­tur­ing…

Denver-​based Alfred Man­u­fac­tur­ing Co., employs 150 res­i­dents. It, too, will “relo­cate part or all of our oper­a­tions out of state” if Demo­c­rat Gov. John Hick­en­looper enacts the strin­gent gun-​control régime pushed by Biden and com­pany. The com­pany has already put expan­sion plans on hold.

And of course we can’t leave out the state doing the absolute best of them all, Cal­i­for­nia, which is doing so well it can spare the rich:

With the new year, big earn­ers are con­fronting a 51.9 per­cent federal-​state income tax hit on earn­ings over $1 mil­lion, the result of a con­flu­ence of new tax-​the-​rich levies imposed by Cal­i­for­nia and Con­gress in the clos­ing days of 2012. That is offi­cially the high­est in the nation.

small busi­nesses

Camp­bell Soup announced in Sep­tem­ber that it was clos­ing its 65-​year-​old plant in Sacra­mento, which employed 700 work­ers, and shift­ing pro­duc­tion to North Car­olina, Ohio and Texas. Chevron is mov­ing 800 tech­ni­cal posi­tions — in other words, jobs that aren’t phys­i­cally sta­tioned on Cal­i­for­nia rigs — to Houston.

Non-​manufacturing busi­nesses are also mov­ing or expand­ing oper­a­tions where labor, land, energy and cap­i­tal are cheaper. Com­cast announced in the fall that it is mov­ing 1,000 call-​center jobs out of Cal­i­for­nia because of the “high cost of doing busi­ness.” Face­book, eBay EBAY and Legal­Zoom have opened up Texas offices in the past few years, while Pay­Pal, Yelp and Maxwell Tech­nolo­gies MXWL have pushed into Phoenix.

and of course the aver­age person

Even while California’s His­panic pop­u­la­tion has grown by more than 1.5 mil­lion since 2005, thanks to high birth rates and for­eign immi­gra­tion, two His­pan­ics have moved out for every one that has moved in from another state. By con­trast, four His­pan­ics from other states have set­tled in Texas and Ari­zona for every three that have left.

It’s not unusual for immi­grants or their descen­dants to move in pur­suit of a bet­ter life. That’s the his­tory of Amer­ica. But it is ironic that many of the intended ben­e­fi­cia­ries of California’s lib­eral gov­ern­ment are run­ning for the state line — and that pro­gres­sive poli­cies appear to be what’s dri­ving them away.

It’s grat­i­fy­ing to see that these states and oth­ers are so pros­per­ous they can spare not only the jobs, but the work­ers who these com­pa­nies employ that fuel eco­nomic growth, and in the fash­ion of true Chris­t­ian char­ity they are giv­ing other states a chance to get those jobs they can spare

law­mak­ers from Texas, Michi­gan, Okla­homa, Ari­zona and South Car­olina are now court­ing Rem­ing­ton away from New York and Mag­pul away from Col­orado.

So if any­one tells you that New Eng­land, Col­orado, Cal­i­for­nia and all those blue states are doing bad, don’t buy it, they’re just doing so well they sim­ply don’t need the jobs and the rev­enue they bring and what to share it with their less for­tu­nate Red State neighbors

Now that’s what I call neighborly!

***********************************

[olimome­ter id=3]

I’d like to say I’m doing as good as the state of Mass­a­chu­setts and able to spare the tip jar hits, but while my total for the week rose 10% that added up to a $2 move from $20 to $22 out of the $300 weekly pay­check I hope to draw.

If you, unlike the GOP think con­ser­v­a­tive blog­gers are worth the invest­ment con­sider being one of the 14 peo­ple who can kick in $20 this week for that weekly $300 pay­check. If you think it’s worth your money and can spare that $20 feel free to hit DaTip­Jar below.





One of the basic rules of economics is supply and demand.

If there is an excessive quantity of an item its relative value drops, this applies not just to basic products and services, but to things such as the money supply.

Likewise if you have an item in short supply, it because more valuable and the holder of that valuable item, commodity or service can pick and choose among offers to their advantage.

This is true of jobs. Jobs are a valuable commodity, employers produce tax revenue, pay for infrastructure and allow produces to be produced in an area but most of all they attract the most valuable commodity of all, people.

Now I’ve been led to understand that there has been a shortage of jobs around this country over the last 4 years, but apparently I’ve been mistaken. Because in state after state we see the elected governments deciding they are a commodity that doesn’t need to be attracted.

Massachusetts:

Shrugging off the fiscal caution of recent years, Governor Deval Patrick proposed a $1.9 billion tax increase tonight in his State of the Commonwealth address, saying it was necessary for the state to invest more in education and the state’s transportation network to “accelerate growth and expand opportunity.”

Who knew Massachusetts was doing so well they didn’t need to attract jobs? Who knew that people like my oldest son, about to graduate from College in May after 4 solid years on the deans list, with decades of earning potential ahead of him is so common we can tax him by the mile.

And the good times are not restricted to the bay state.

Maine:

P.A.T. Products, an international distributor of specialty chemicals, plastic and raw materials, has been based in Bangor for 39 years.

Leo Coyle, the company’s founder and president, told the Bangor Daily News he is moving the company’s corporate headquarters to the Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth, N.H., because of that state’s more attractive tax structure and to be closer to his markets.

39 years in Maine, why move now?

“I’m not trying to bash Maine,” he said, adding that it’s a great place to raise children. But during his 40 years living in the state, he said he has become frustrated by what he sees as Maine’s attitude toward business and industry.

“Until the state of Maine gets their act together, there’ll be more and more and more people leaving. I’ve been watching it for 40-plus years. What do I see? I see people saying they can’t take it anymore. I’m not alone,”

Who knew Maine was doing so well they could spare him? Lets be fair, the legislature has done all it can to keep him in Maine, however that legislature has been the newly elected Democrat legislature of…

…New Hampshire:

Lately they have been doing their best to keep companies there in all kinds of ways…

Tobacco Taxes

So the New Hampshire House just passed a bill to tack on another 0.20 cents a pack.

This ‘revenue’ will be extracted from predominantly middle and lower income people, but the left has an excuse.

Boat Taxes

With the lessened taxes: Based on the rates scheduled to go into effect on July 1, 2015, the Department states revenue produced per fiscal year would be $1,529,580. Yes, this is the Republican law
With the Democrat tax hike: Based on the current number of vessel registrations, the Department states the fees in effect produce $3,059,160 of revenue per fiscal year.

Fuel Oil:

By vote of 186 to 165 the Democrat controlled New Hampshire House passed a 25% increase in New Hampshire’s fuel oil tax.

A “county income tax

Tomorrow there is a hearing (10am – LOB 301) for HB 330. HB 330 would allow any county delegation in New Hampshire to adopt a ‘County Income tax’ to be administered by the New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration

And of course a gas tax

All of us are, or should be, concerned over the necessity of the $1 billion gas tax increase in HB 617. Many of us are looking for an alternative that will address the requirement that we maintain our highways and bridges while avoiding what apparently would be the biggest tax increase in New Hampshire history.

And all of that is after only 5 months of Democrat control!

Who knew that in this short period of time New Hampshire has become such a strong state that they don’t need all those business and people from Maine Massachusetts, Vermont, Rhode Island, and New York to consider relocating in New Hampshire in the future?

And such prosperity isn’t limited to the east. Let’s look west to…

Colorado

Colorado is in such good shape Gov Hickenlooper he can afford to sign this

Colorado’s governor signed bills Wednesday that place new restrictions on firearms, signaling a change for Democrats who have traditionally shied away from gun control in a state with a pioneer tradition of gun ownership and self-reliance

even though it leads to this

Ammunition magazine manufacturer Magpul Industries said it plans to begin leaving Colorado “almost immediately,” and other firms may follow suit in the wake of a new law that limits ammunition magazine capacities.

“Our moving efforts are underway,” Magpul chief operating officer Doug Smith said Wednesday. “Within the next 30 days we will manufacture our first magazine outside the state of Colorado.”

Who knew Colorado was doing so well they could spare businesses like Magpul and Lawrence Tool & Molding…

“We’re basically going to follow Magpul and do our best to continue being a supplier for them,” said Lloyd Lawrence, owner of Denver-based Lawrence Tool & Molding. “It will probably be out of state.”

Lawrence said about 50 to 60 percent of his business comes from supplying magazine parts to Magpul.

and Alfred Manufacturing…

Denver-based Alfred Manufacturing Co., employs 150 residents. It, too, will “relocate part or all of our operations out of state” if Democrat Gov. John Hickenlooper enacts the stringent gun-control regime pushed by Biden and company. The company has already put expansion plans on hold.

And of course we can’t leave out the state doing the absolute best of them all, California, which is doing so well it can spare the rich:

With the new year, big earners are confronting a 51.9 percent federal-state income tax hit on earnings over $1 million, the result of a confluence of new tax-the-rich levies imposed by California and Congress in the closing days of 2012. That is officially the highest in the nation.

small businesses

Campbell Soup announced in September that it was closing its 65-year-old plant in Sacramento, which employed 700 workers, and shifting production to North Carolina, Ohio and Texas. Chevron is moving 800 technical positions—in other words, jobs that aren’t physically stationed on California rigs—to Houston.

Non-manufacturing businesses are also moving or expanding operations where labor, land, energy and capital are cheaper. Comcast announced in the fall that it is moving 1,000 call-center jobs out of California because of the “high cost of doing business.” Facebook, eBay EBAY and LegalZoom have opened up Texas offices in the past few years, while PayPal, Yelp and Maxwell Technologies MXWL have pushed into Phoenix.

and of course the average person

Even while California’s Hispanic population has grown by more than 1.5 million since 2005, thanks to high birth rates and foreign immigration, two Hispanics have moved out for every one that has moved in from another state. By contrast, four Hispanics from other states have settled in Texas and Arizona for every three that have left.

It’s not unusual for immigrants or their descendants to move in pursuit of a better life. That’s the history of America. But it is ironic that many of the intended beneficiaries of California’s liberal government are running for the state line—and that progressive policies appear to be what’s driving them away.

It’s gratifying to see that these states and others are so prosperous they can spare not only the jobs, but the workers who these companies employ that fuel economic growth, and in the fashion of true Christian charity they are giving other states a chance to get those jobs they can spare

lawmakers from Texas, Michigan, Oklahoma, Arizona and South Carolina are now courting Remington away from New York and Magpul away from Colorado.

So if anyone tells you that New England, Colorado, California and all those blue states are doing bad, don’t buy it, they’re just doing so well they simply don’t need the jobs and the revenue they bring and what to share it with their less fortunate Red State neighbors

Now that’s what I call neighborly!

***********************************

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I’d like to say I’m doing as good as the state of Massachusetts and able to spare the tip jar hits, but while my total for the week rose 10% that added up to a $2 move from $20 to $22 out of the $300 weekly paycheck I hope to draw.

If you, unlike the GOP think conservative bloggers are worth the investment consider being one of the 14 people who can kick in $20 this week for that weekly $300 paycheck. If you think it’s worth your money and can spare that $20 feel free to hit DaTipJar below.





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