While the rest of the net focuses on the President’s lame attempt to be king by changing law by fiat (unconstitutional) and shift blame for his failures to the Insurance industry (unscrupulous) or the attempts of pro abortion groups to use feminists as suckers (uncomplicated) at DaTechGuy Blog we want to focus on what really matters: How the Doctor Who Mini Episode was received?

We’ve already established it made my day as for everyone else, the reactions were fast and furious but Entertainment Weekly really nailed the priorities of Dr. Who fans concerning this:

Are you a fan of Doctor Who? Then you need to stop what you’re doing  — be it driving a car, flying a plane, or talking about how you didn’t sexually harass a member of your mayoral staff — and watch the just-released video below, which contains a big surprise and sets up the forthcoming 50th anniversary special show, which debuts November 23.

Sydney Morning Herald:

The internet exploded overnight with the release of an epic Doctor Who mini-episode that revealed key details about the character’s past and saw the return of a beloved actor.

The Metro found 10 amazing things:

Love the frock coat, love the waistcoat, love the necktie (neckties are cool) and the S-belt too. The shirt bears a slight resemblance to Patrick Troughton’s scruffy attire and is plain filthy – but then there is a war going on. The eighth Doctor is a long way off from the immaculate Edwardian gentleman from Doctor Who: The Movie – and that’s no bad thing.

And check out the screwdriver too, like Pertwee’s and a lot like Tom Baker’s. When will it be in the shops?

That’s actually the image from the last Dr. Who audio mini series

Den of Geek:

McGann nails it, basically, and the fact that he never got a full series seems even more of a shame.

More please, will go the cry, though realistically it’s unlikely to happen. Screw realism though. Love Big Finish as we do, there’s just something about seeing him on television that is indescribably exciting.

Comic book.com

yes, what appears to be a major revelation about the nature of John Hurt’s character in Day of the Doctor can be found below. Check it out at your own risk, although this is apparently the way the BBC and Stephen Moffat have elected to reveal.

The Mirror:

There’s one surprise that nothing can beat. The Eighth Doctor’s glorious reappearance. Having previously only appeared in 1996’s TV Movie, it seemed that Paul McGann’s Doctor would be forever consigned to DVD replays when the series was revived without him in 2005. But here he is… And what an entrance. Moffat didn’t just pick up from the movie, he couldn’t. In a short amount of time he gave us an Eighth Doctor with history.

Older of face, shorter of hair and far more practical of togs, the dashing Time Lord was back with a tonne of baggage. The main revelation amongst the jaw-dropping surprise? The Doctor became involved in the Great Time War at a fairly late stage. It’s amazing he managed to dodge the Time Lords for so long, but it means that he gets the best of both worlds. Here the Eighth Doctor gets to be the dashing hero, sharp-tongued wit as well as catalyst for the 50th Special all in one go.

The Atlantic Wire:

One other interesting element of “The Night of the Doctor” is that it seems to canonize a major part of the show’s fan-built universe. Doctor Who, like other big, geeky properties such as Star Wars, has a very large expanded world via both official and unlicensed comics, novels, and audio plays. Much of this added content formed in the years the show was off the air between 1989 and 2005 (not counting McGann’s movie). In “The Night of the Doctor,” the Doctor mentions the names of companions from the Big Finish audio stories. So, it would seem that Big Finish’s work—created by a third party, not the BBC—is now fair game for the TV series. Fans should be geeked at the possibilities afforded to the show by access to these worlds. They should also be geeked about the fact that for its most momentous episode ever, Doctor Who might just be as cunning and inventive as its protagonist.

As a big finish fan that’s huge for me.

The Telegraph:

McGann’s reprisal of the role follows Colin Baker statement that he, Sylvester McCoy and McGann were not “deemed worthy of inclusion” in the 50th anniversary special, The Day of the Doctor.

a bit if misdirection there but not a lie.

Buzzfeed quotes the biggest misdirection of all:

So he wasn’t technically lying when he said this.

 

I was a bit dismayed, a bit gutted, but [the older Doctors] are not in it. There are all kinds of rumours doing the rounds. One gets tired of trying to refute things on Twitter and the like, but – take it from me – I’m not in it.

Wired:

There are more clues to both the 50th anniversary episode and the larger Doctor Who mythology hidden within the episode — note how the Time Lords are perceived, and how scared Cass is of the Doctor — but for now, consider the episode an unexpected early birthday present from the BBC to the Doctor. Who knows? Maybe we’ll see more such things between now and the November 23 global simulcast of “The Day of the Doctor.”

While there were some who saw an agenda everyone as a rule loved what was on the screen we have to head back to the Den of Geek for the best observation of the day:

The Eighth Doctor’s decision in The Night of the Doctor fits cleverly with the events of his Big Finish arc (and that seems to be the one that Moffat has settled on, which makes sense over the comics and the books because Big Finish’s Eighth Doctor series is ongoing). Indeed, I know a fair few people who are going to be crying over this, because it is really tragic. You can still see traces of ‘These shoes! They fit perfectly!’ in McGann’s performance. If you don’t know the Eighth Doctor backstory, I’d imagine it’s still a moving scene.

Remember that voice of the Daleks Nick Briggs is the boss at Big Finish I’m wondering in the back of my head if Briggs made sure the direction of the character headed where Moffat wanted it to go.
Anyways it’s an episode worth watching over and over and if you still haven’t seen it, here it is again:

After all you can’t have too much of a quality product.

Since 2010, the states one by one have been adopting the Common Core Standards in education. These standards were intended to bring uniformity of what was being taught across the nation. In other words, little Johnny who is in 3rd grade in Nebraska would be learning the same set of skills as little Susie in 3rd grade in Alabama. The standards were supposed to be rigorous and high reaching, but in reality have shown to be less rigorous than most state standards they are intended to replace. Instead of high reaching, the Common Core reaches more to the middle.  Fun fact to note here, the bulk of curriculum behind these standards wasn’t even written when the states adopted it.

The Common Core curriculum aligned lessons that have surfaced recently in the media and those landing on Facebook pages, Twitter and the like, have led many parents to wonder in horror exactly what little Johnny and Susie are learning. Case in point, a rather disturbing English lesson that is aligned with Common Core coming out of a South Milwaukee High School. In this lesson, kids are asked to decide who gets to get into a fictitious lifeboat based on religious and political views, race and sexual orientation.  Sounds like a Benetton ad gone horribly wrong, no?  Mind you, not all lessons you see popping up in the media like this one are specific to the Common Core curriculum. Some existed before the standards were adopted. Frankly, I don’t find comfort in either notion.

 

 

Twitchy has a close up of the text of the image in that tweet.

Horrifying.

In this case, our kids might have to cheat in order to win with Core aligned lessons like this one.  I hence have dubbed this lesson The Identity Politics Kobayashi Maru. An alternative name in our universe might be ‘GOP Messaging Maru’.  Anyway, Captain Kirk beat it:

Another Kobayashi Maru style lesson teaches 4th grade kids about their “White privilege”.  EAG news looked at teaching guides being produced by the Zaner-Bloser company and found this reference to “White privilege” in the 4th grade section:

 

This guide is for 4th grade teachers, and it contains texts and lessons that have the common theme of “Meeting Challenges.”

This particular lesson is based on a book called “The Jacket.” The Zaner-Bloser folks obviously consider this an important book because they designed a two-week lesson plan for it.

The story centers around a young white boy named Phil who wrongly accuses an African-American student of stealing his brother’s jacket.

It’s a fun little book about racism and white privilege – a left-wing concept that teaches African Americans the values of American society are designed to benefit white people.

 

Lovely. Those doubting indoctrination can chew on that one.

For more facts and information on Common Core, I recommend checking out the site I contribute to in North Carolina called StopCommonCoreNC.org.

http://stopcommoncorenc.org/

Of particular use is the resource page:

http://stopcommoncorenc.org/resources/

 

Rise in Home Schooling

Common Core designed and aligned or not, these lessons are likely playing a part of the rise in home schooling. The mere mention of the words ‘zero tolerance’ will make most people with kids cringe. Parents I’ve talked to who have pulled their kids out to home school directly cite the big reason for their switch being linked to wanting more control over the content of what their children were learning. One mother I spoke to said that, for her, watching the increasing government presence in their lives overall made her look more closely at the impact  of increasing government overreach was having on her children. That meant looking at the public school her three kids attended. They didn’t like the broad influences they saw and pulled their kids out.

Parents are looking for more customization for their children’s educations.  Glenn Reynolds wrote an article about that very concept of customizing your kid’s schooling.  Earlier this week, fellow M-7er Linda Szugyi mentioned this same article. We clearly have amazing taste in reading. Heh.  Back to Professor Reynolds.

The article was titled, How Home Schooling Threatens the Education Monopoly. Here is the opening, but read the whole thing:

“What about home schooling? You know, it’s not just for scary religious people any more.” That’s a line from Buffy The Vampire Slayer, and it should strike fear into the hearts, not of vampires, but of public-school administrators everywhere.

The fact is, Americans across the country — but especially in large, urban school systems — are voting with their feet and abandoning traditional public schools, to the point that teachers are facing layoffs. Some are going to charter schools, which are still public but are run more flexibly. Some are leaving for private schools. But many others are going another step beyond traditional education, and switching to online school or even pure home schooling.

 

What the article doesn’t cover is the anxiety some moms out here have about taking that leap. Moms like yours truly, for example. So what’s holding me back?  This question opens up a new can of worms to possibly discuss and write about another time. Stay tuned. Hope you enjoyed my Magnificent Seven Debut!

 

A major job of the (Boston) Globe will be to determine not only what news will be of interest to its readers, but what news should be of interest.

John Henry Oct 27 2013

Less than 72 hours ago I posted on the new videos from Project Veritas along with my exclusive interview with Daniel Francisco the Executive Director showing Obamacare shenanigans in Texas

Well it didn’t take long for those caught on videos  to become expendable:

The Urban League of Greater Dallas has reportedly fired one person and suspended three others after an undercover video from James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas caught Obamacare “navigators” advising a potential applicant to “lie”and provide false information to get a lower premium and more subsidies.

In a statement Tuesday, the Urban League said it “does not condone, nor would we ever sanction, misleading the public or any individual who seeks our assistance about any issue, and particularly in this case, an issue as critical as health care,” KDFW-TV reports.

The local Dallas Fort Worth Fox station filed a report. Watch the news report.  It’s worth noting while the Feds aren’t talking to the press it was DHS the recommended “de-certifying” the navigators in question.

We’ve seen the standard response about “edited” video from the Urban League

The Urban League also called for the unedited video of the incidents to be released. It said the undercover applicants were told the people they were speaking to were Navigators-in-training and “the full context of these comments is not reflected in the video.”

It’s interesting to see that the left IS learning, for example they’re not accusing O’Keefe & company of lying this time around.

What I find more interesting however is, with Obamacare being THE story in the news, how the MSM is handling the story of these videos, and the firing/suspensions of these navigators for the program.

CNN

Veritas cnn

ABC

Veritas abc

CBS

Veritas cbs

and MSNBC

Veritas msnbc

Either none of these organization find a story of people fired for abuses involving administration of  obamacare THE most talked about subject in the country today,  newsworthy or apparently they’ve decided to go the full “Tree falling in the forest” figuring that with Bill Clinton et/al dominating the Obamacare story if nobody hears about it on their networks they won’t make a sound.

I would think such a story would immediately be recognized as newsworthy by any competent editor, but I don’t pay the bills at those news organizations so if they choose not to cover the story its their prerogative but perhaps the word “news” should be removed from their letterhead for the sake of accuracy.  .

Oh and in case you’re wondering I searched the Boston Globe for the phrase “project veritas” over the last 30 days as well

veritas globe 30 daysWhen John Henry said the Globe would decide what should be of interest to its readers, he wasn’t kidding.

 

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Olimometer 2.52

It’s Thursday and the first week of DaTipJar since the DaTechGy’s magnificent seven began it’s ride has only managed to generate 20% of my weekly goal.

If you want to know why you should provide one of the 14 $20 or 11 $25 tip jar hitters needed to make this weeks goal consider:

This is my third post on the Project Veritas story in three days. As I type these words that’s three more than CNN, CBS, MSNBC, ABC & the Boston Globe combined.

Think about it.