How things can get worse in Venezuela

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How things can get worse in Venezuela

Most of us don’t pay much atten­tion to Latin Amer­i­can coun­tries. The Euro­peans, the Mid­dle East, China, and back in the 1980s, Japan, get most of the headlines.

I know this from expe­ri­ence since I have been blog­ging on Latin Amer­ica for almost ten years; while my blog gets a nice amount of vis­i­tors and I have been invited to speak at con­fer­ences, Latin Amer­ica is not a sub­ject that draws much atten­tion from the pub­lic at large, except when it comes to the sub­ject of immigration.

But Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics affects the USA, not only regard­ing immi­gra­tion. When you have a for­merly wealthy, oil-​producing coun­try bankrolling some of the extreme-​left nations in our hemi­sphere, while at the same time head­ing head-​first down the Com­mu­nist abyss, it’s worth not­ing the change in geopolitics.

Things are bad in Venezuela right now. For instance,

By now you’re prob­a­bly ask­ing, how can things get worse? Mark­ing the start of a new period of repres­sion, 11 women were arrested on Mon­day for peace­fully protest­ing the new enabling law:

Maduro also wants Inter­pol to arrest JJ Rendón (who is now liv­ing out­side the coun­try), the polit­i­cal strate­gist to oppo­si­tion leader Hen­rique Capriles, and has pro­claimed that he will deal “with an iron hand” with any­one who dare ques­tion the results of the upcom­ing munic­i­pal elec­tions sched­uled for Decem­ber 8 (link in Span­ish) — a day he has pro­claimed Hugo Chavez day.

Threats, indeed.

The real crack­down is already start­ing: Maduro is now arrest­ing small busi­ness own­ers. Their crime? Own­ing a busi­ness:

Venezue­lan Pres­i­dent Nico­las Maduro said on Thurs­day that author­i­ties had arrested more than 100 “bour­geois” busi­ness­men in a crack­down on alleged price-​gouging since the week­end. “We have more than 100 of the bour­geoisie behind bars at the moment,” Maduro said in a speech to the nation.

In a coun­try where cor­rup­tion is the order of the day, my only the­ory is that Maduro may be seiz­ing elec­tron­ics stores, for instance, and hand­ing them to mem­bers of the mil­i­tary as a means to keep­ing the mil­i­tary happy and paid off, since Cuban intel­li­gence now is in charge of the mil­i­tary.

Where will the elec­tron­ics and the appli­ances come from? China, per­haps.

Not that elec­tric appli­ances rep­re­sent a threat to the USA. A Com­mu­nist coun­try that has direct flights from Iran and Syria may, though… par­tic­u­larly after US Sec­re­tary of State John Kerry pub­licly repu­di­ated the Mon­roe Doc­trine.

Things will be get­ting a lot worse.

Most of us don’t pay much attention to Latin American countries. The Europeans, the Middle East, China, and back in the 1980s, Japan, get most of the headlines.

I know this from experience since I have been blogging on Latin America for almost ten years; while my blog gets a nice amount of visitors and I have been invited to speak at conferences, Latin America is not a subject that draws much attention from the public at large, except when it comes to the subject of immigration.

But Latin American politics affects the USA, not only regarding immigration. When you have a formerly wealthy, oil-producing country bankrolling some of the extreme-left nations in our hemisphere, while at the same time heading head-first down the Communist abyss, it’s worth noting the change in geopolitics.

Things are bad in Venezuela right now. For instance,

By now you’re probably asking, how can things get worse? Marking the start of a new period of repression, 11 women were arrested on Monday for peacefully protesting the new enabling law:

Maduro also wants Interpol to arrest JJ Rendón (who is now living outside the country), the political strategist to opposition leader Henrique Capriles, and has proclaimed that he will deal “with an iron hand” with anyone who dare question the results of the upcoming municipal elections scheduled for December 8 (link in Spanish) – a day he has proclaimed Hugo Chavez day.

Threats, indeed.

The real crackdown is already starting: Maduro is now arresting small business owners. Their crime? Owning a business:

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro said on Thursday that authorities had arrested more than 100 “bourgeois” businessmen in a crackdown on alleged price-gouging since the weekend. “We have more than 100 of the bourgeoisie behind bars at the moment,” Maduro said in a speech to the nation.

In a country where corruption is the order of the day, my only theory is that Maduro may be seizing electronics stores, for instance, and handing them to members of the military as a means to keeping the military happy and paid off, since Cuban intelligence now is in charge of the military.

Where will the electronics and the appliances come from? China, perhaps.

Not that electric appliances represent a threat to the USA. A Communist country that has direct flights from Iran and Syria may, though. . . particularly after US Secretary of State John Kerry publicly repudiated the Monroe Doctrine.

Things will be getting a lot worse.