Did you miss last week’s show with Tim Imholt on the Iran Bomb & his candidacy? Well it’s available here.

Or perhaps you missed the 2nd hour with Da Magnificent Panel With Tim, Yid with Lid and Maxine Baptiste

You can listen to that here.

As always our panel had pieces to recommend:

Yid with lid was talking Stupid Media Bias Tricks:

This week one college professor told white men they deserve to die, another said Thanksgiving was for sociopaths and a third ruined the holiday by suggesting Obama should have four more years as President. On Thanksgiving we also remembered when the media claimed that George Bush’s turkey was plastic.

Since last Friday, a man with cancer was audited by the IRS because he complained to Megyn Kelly about losing his healthcare, the Huffington Post got Anti-Semitic and Obama’s polling numbers were brutal.

The Pieces that they wanted to recommend are

From Maxine it’s this opinion piece:

Voter Suppression’s New Pretext

Some background: In June, the Supreme Court struck down a core provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, under which nine states and portions of others had to get federal approval before changing their election laws.

One of those states, Texas, is again in court, facing a Justice Department suit seeking to get the state under federal oversight again. To do so, the Justice Department must prove intentional racial discrimination.

Because is there is one thing we can be sure of this justice department isn’t going to make suits based on political considerations, I mean that would be like thinking the IRS would go after the Tea party to suppress them.

And from Tim Imholt this on Iran and the Nuke Deal:

The White House released a multi-page fact sheet containing details of the draft agreement shortly after the deal was announced.

However, Iranian foreign ministry official on Tuesday rejected the White House’s version of the deal as “invalid” and accused Washington of releasing a factually inaccurate primer that misleads the American public.

“What has been released by the website of the White House as a fact sheet is a one-sided interpretation of the agreed text in Geneva and some of the explanations and words in the sheet contradict the text of the Joint Plan of Action, and this fact sheet has unfortunately been translated and released in the name of the Geneva agreement by certain media, which is not true,” Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Marziyeh Afkham told the Iranian press on Tuesday.

Nothing says “Peace in our time” like a deal where the two sides publicly disagree on what it says.

Next week we have a new panel and new topics to deal with so keep an eye here at DatechGuy blog and an ear ready for DaTechGuy on DaRadio every Saturday.

Last week, I was talking with some friends and one of them brought up the Washington Redskins mascot controversy. When I suggested that the team’s name be changed to the ‘Washington Negroes,’ it brought the house down.

From there, someone brought up the old Roots miniseries and we got to talking about Alex Haley (1921-1992) the author of the book on which the miniseries was based. In 1978, Haley was sued for plagiarism by Harold_Courlander and the plaintiff won. One of my companions wondered why he hadn’t just published the book as a work of fiction in the first place.

It was then that I was reminded of the historical novel The Dahomean, written by Frank Yerby (1916-1991) and published in 1971. Set in nineteenth-century Virginia, the initial scenario has two white farmers deciding what to name their newly-purchased slave. The slave tells them his African name when asked and speaks only rudimentary English–obviously fresh from his seaborne transport.

The rest of the novel consists of the slave’s memories of his life as a free man in Africa–in the Kingdom of Dahomey. It is fantastic–a great work. (At my first reading of the book I was about twelve years old. I didn’t read it again until I was in my forties, curious to see if my fledgling judgment of the book’s quality held up against my adult reading sensibilities. It did and remains my favorite novel.)

Undoubtedly, Haley was aware of Yerby–an accomplished writer at the time of the publication of The Dahomean–and was also aware of how little commercial success The Dahomean had garnered. (In Yerby’s “A Note to the Reader,” he acknowledges basing his fiction on Melville J. Herskovits’ Dahomey: An Ancient West African Kingdom.) Whether the contemporaneous public showed little interest in such a topic or whether Yerby’s publishers did little to promote Yerby’s novel is unknown. But I suspect that Haley didn’t want a similar obscurity for Roots–published in 1976–and, to that end, decided to pawn it off as an autobiography. No one would find out, he thought. He was correct…for a while. But the truth came out, as it always does.

As for The Dahomean, I’ve always thought it would make a decent movie. In this climate of political correctness, however, the production would certainly have to be independently financed because Yerby’s Dahomeans are, indeed, not politically correct.

As for the present-day climate of racial division and blame for the sins of dead ancestors, Mr. Yerby addresses these things for his own time and I’ll let him speak for himself.

The thoughtful reader will observe that the writer has not attempted to make the Dahomeans either more or less than what they were. He is aware that truth is an uncomfortable quality; that neither the racist, the liberal, nor the advocates of Black Power and/or Pride will find much support for their dearly held and perhaps, to them, emotionally and psychologically necessary myths herein.

So be it. Myths solve nothing, arrange nothing. But then, as the protagonist of this novel is driven in the end to put it, perhaps there are no viable solutions or arrangements in life for any of the desperate problems facing humanity in an all too hostile world.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel,Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her new novel, Arlen’s Harem, is due in January 2014. Help her fund it and help keep her blog alive!

 

Update:  (DTG) After reading this post all it reminded me of this one at the Corner.

Update:  (JAO) The URL of my personal blog has been updated.

One of the things that really fuels success for the left is ignorance.

When you have people ignorant of the truth it is easier to sell the message of someone as a Hero and someone else as a villain and two stories today perfectly illustrated this.

First we have this from Marquette University where they are using Textbooks authored by Domestic Terrorist Bill Ayers. Turning Point USA decided to see what the Student body thought of that fact.

It’s actually gratifying to see that the youth of America when actually informed of who Bill Ayers is rejecting him.

On the other end we have Pam Geller who has, along with Robert Spencer been regularly vilified by the same left. You might recall they were banned from entering England and the reason given was was banned from England, supposedly because their presence was “not conducive to the public good“,

Today in the Daily Caller we discover that their actual motivations were a tad more shall we say “nuanced”

I have received initial feedback from Post to say that they do not expect that there would be any reaction from the US Administration to these exclusions.

We do have concerns with some of the reasoning in the sub, particularly citing pro-Israeli views and. [sic] Pro-Israeli views (and also support for waterboarding) apply to a large number of Americans, including former Presidents. If, for instance, Geller and Spencer were to request details of their exclusion under FOI/DPA or other mechanism, that being pro-Israeli is cited as a reason may be problematic and they could argue publically that their exclusion is on the basis of their support for Israel.

I may get further advice from Post later tonight which I will send to you first thing in the morning. Meanwhile, we advise removing references to being pro-Israel from the main body of the sub as this is not grounds for exclusion.

So we have the Government trying to hide support of Israel as a motivating factor for banning Americans.  That’s bad enough but it gets worse when you consider who they dispatched to build the case against Pam & Robert:

One of the other among a multitude of agencies investigating our case was a Casework and Operations Red Team for Special Cases. That’s right: the Home Secretary employed a Red Team on our case. Red Teams are designed to devise new strategies and approaches to deal with a threat.

A Red Team to investigate Pam & Robert?  Seriously?

Now if this information had been revealed at the time of their banning England might have found themselves much too embarrassed to follow through and questions might have been asked about the use of taxpayer funds earmarked to defend Brittan to suppress speech rather than protect the public.  Are these Red Teams or the Neville Chamberlain Teams? Frontpage Mag nailed it:

To the Dhimmi crowd, being pro-Israel is just another way of offending Muslims and when you offend Muslims, then bombs start going off.

Last year on the occasion of their banning I said this in an open letter to the British Government:

With the decision to exclude Pam Geller and Robert Spencer who have argued tirelessly against Jihad, against Honor Killings and against Islamic Violence you have taken an action that is so diametrically opposed to the principles of freedom of speech and expression that I would not think a country that calls itself “free” would dare do so.

The revelation of these documents unfortunately removes the blissful and convenient ignorance of these facts.  The left can only hope that they can do their best to maintain the ignorance of this to the general public indefinitely

I was about to start a piece on the latest Obamacare trap when I spotted Charles Davis story at Memeorandum and my Irony detector started exploding.

You need to let the person being interviewed explain why he is terrible, which is more easily done when he thinks you are stupid or on his side.

What I did looked and felt like an entry-level job in the media. And I enjoyed it—I liked going up to any old white guy in a suit and asking him to explain in his own words why he’s destroying the country. I felt as if I had sort of made it, as much as an English major can. I wasn’t living at home, I got to carry a microphone, and my work was broadcast over the radio. To an outsider looking in, I almost looked like a respectable person.

The problem was I wasn’t being compensated for any of that work or my veneer of respectability.

What? I thought it was those “old white guys” who were ruining the country, not the people who sent you to show why they were so terrible?

As the article continues we discover this is not unusual for the left. Mother Jones, the American Prospect, Common Cause, The New Republic, the Washington monthly, Democracy Now! the Nation all liberal lions and foes of the evil exploiters like WalMart were all doing and paying (or not paying) the same.

Some claimed ignorance:

Robert Reich served as labor secretary under Bill Clinton and is outspoken in his support for a living wage. But when I asked him about the trend of entry-level jobs being relabeled “internships” and being stripped of the pay, benefits, and legal rights they once offered recent college grads (by some estimates, half of the estimated 1.5 million interns in America are unpaid), he professed ignorance.

“This is not a topic I’ve given much thought,” said Reich.

At the New Republic back in October they defended it:

Yes, Young Writers Should Give Their Work Away for Free It’s sad but true: There’s no other way to make it

Picture for a moment if Sam Walton or his successors wrote a piece called “Young shelf stockers should give their work away for free…” The howl of outrage led by the publications above would be the only story in the county.

But the excuse that really caught my eye came from the Washington Monthly

“The reason we don’t pay interns is that we’re a small nonprofit operation and we can’t afford it,” explained Paul Glastris, editor of the Washington Monthly. “We think it’s a valuable experience—it certainly was for me, having started in this business as an unpaid intern at the Washington Monthly.”


Oh they don’t pay workers because they can’t afford it
Mr. Glastris let me tell you a story…

This blog started a week after I lost my job. This week we begin our 6th year. In February for the first time I started drawing a regular pay of $305 weekly before taxes when my readers were willing to pay it to cover the mortgage. In November in a leap of faith I brought on seven writers (Marathon Pundit, Linda Szugyi, Baldilocks, Fausta, AP “Lady Liberty” Dillon, Pastor George Kelly and Steve Eggleston). This is something any reader of this blog already knows

What they (and you Mr. Glastris) don’t know is before I extended that first offer I called up several friends in the business to establish what a fair price range per word was for freelance work to see if I could afford it. I had an idea of how much I figured I could raise my weekly goal and still (hopefully) make it. If the cost was beyond what I thought I could afford. The plan would have stopped right there.

Based on what they told me I made my offers based on them delivering a single piece of 250 words once a week. That is what each of my writers are asked to deliver and that’s what they are paid for. It is on that figure that I increased my weekly goal with readers by just over 11% to a whopping $340 weekly to see the market could bear that price and signed each of my writers for a period of three months to see if it can be done.

That is how capitalism works

My exit question for the left is this: If this blog expect to pay its writers a fair freelance wage when I’m barely making my mortgage how is it that you are OK with doing otherwise or needed Mr. Davis’ piece to change your ways?

Update: Stacy McCain got to this story before me and noted some serious irony

Though it does not pay its professionally experienced interns a dime, Salon (which has published my work in the past) has had the chutzpah to run a number of stories on the plight of unpaid workers, such as, “‘Intern Nation’: Are We Exploiting a Generation of Workers?” and “Unpaid and Sexually Harassed: The Latest Intern Injustice.” The company did not respond to a request for comment.

(The saddest part about this? Although it doesn’t pay its interns a red cent, Salon has still managed to lose millions of dollars a year, every year, since the days of 56K-baud dial-up modems. But, hey, stupid liberals get the “glamour” of working for nothing at a money-losing lefty blog whose star writer is Joan Walsh, so there’s that.)

While offering some advice:

as a shameless capitalist blogger, I’m going to suggest readers shop for fabulous savings at Amazon (from which I receive a small commission) and also include a PayPal “donate” button, so readers can pay me for the pleasure of mocking your stupidity.

Full disclosure Stacy McCain was one of the people I consulted with to establish my per-word rate for the writers

Update 2:  Do conservatives do better?  Well Newsbusters does and calls them out: (emphasis mine)

MRC has long paid its interns, and is presently paying $11 an hour. For so-called progressive organizations that demand higher minimum wages across society, it’s hard to fathom the depth of their hypocrisy on unpaid or barely-paid interns — especially when they have top staff making six-figure salaries.

You can’t claim “measly little nonprofit” status with that kind of wage at the top.

Update 3:  Yid with Lid:

As America approached the holiday buying season Mother Jones writers continually attacked Walmart, the country’s biggest retailer for paying some of its workers at the federal minimum wage level $7.25 an hour.  While there are many reasons to disagree with the Mother Jones stance, perhaps the biggest reason was revealed on Monday—even at $7.25 an hour, Walmart is paying 21% more than Mother Jones pays its lowest level employees.  That’s assuming the magazine’s employees are working only 40 hours a week, which according to the report is a big assumption.

We’ll be hearing more from the Lid later today

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Olimometer 2.52

It’s Tuesday and we are only $47 toward our weekly goal of $340 to cover the Mortgage and Da Magnificent Seven I mentioned above.

In November we missed our goal by 13% being short both for the mortgage and for the Seven and unlike the liberal sites mentioned above we don’t have liberal interests keeping us going or internet millionaires keeping the spigots open. Our funding comes from the Tip Jar Hitters and readers. If we deliver (and if they can afford it) they hit DaTipjar and we make it, if we don’t deliver or they can’t afford it, we don’t.

It’s that simple.

Help us make it, please consider hitting DaTipJar below.

We are also offering sponsorships of both the Magnificent Seven & Da Magnificent Panel now is an excellent time to jump on board, contact me here for more details