Amy Glass: The Epitome of Decadent

by A.P. Dillon | January 30th, 2014

Readability

Amy Glass: The Epitome of Decadent

By A.P. Dil­lon

Over the week­end, there was another round of Hilary Ros­en­ing. By that I mean the dis­parag­ing of stay at home moms. This war on women by other women started with Rosen, was picked up by Michelle Gold­berg and then again by Eliz­a­beth Wurtzel. The lat­est to pick up the man­tle is a woman named Amy Glass.

This Amy Glass per­son wrote an arti­cle titled, I Look Down On Young Women With Hus­bands And Kids And I’m Not Sorry. I’m not link­ing to it. She doesn’t deserve more than the one click she got out of me already.

You’re prob­a­bly say­ing that couldn’t really be the title. No, really. That was the title. You didn’t even have to read it to know what this child­less, Ivory tower, I’m-your-better-so– listen-​to-​me type was going to say.

Here’s the Cliff Notes ver­sion of what she thinks about stay at home moms (SAHMS):

  • SAHMS are aver­age and “do nothing”.
  • It’s hid­ing from the fact SAHMS have “no real accomplishments”.
  • SAHMS are “con­di­tioned” to think what they do is impor­tant when in fact, accord­ing to Glass, it’s stupid.
  • It’s not a real job. Doc­tors and engi­neers are real jobs.

Let me respond to these four points in kind with the level of sophis­ti­ca­tion that Ms. Glass dis­played: No.

Longer: The level of self-​importance and lack of self-​awareness in this woman’s arti­cle is stag­ger­ing. Glass sit there and plays Jenga with the roles of soci­ety, rip­ping out the one that brings the rest of the pieces top­pling down.

On Moth­er­hood

As some­one who worked before she stayed home, let me enlighten Ms. Glass. I’m pos­si­bly her worst night­mare since I am col­lege edu­cated and worked in the cor­po­rate world for over a decade before hav­ing a child. In fact, I have two now. Ya know what? I LOVE STAY­ING HOME WITH MY KIDS. *gasp* It’s the most reward­ing thing I’ve ever done. You’re a fool.

It should be noted that I still rec­og­nize to this day that there are women who chose to work out­side the home instead of being stay at home — that’s fine and that is their choice. By the same token, some of them have to work out­side the home, some don’t. Either way, it’s their choice. I made a choice too and that was to raise my chil­dren. Con­trary to Ms. Glass’ point of view: Women do have choices. These choices shouldn’t be dis­par­aged, but should be cel­e­brated. Per­haps it’s that very fact we have choices that ticks her off so bad — we’re not choos­ing as she has.

I thought a bit like Ms. Glass before hav­ing kids. In fact, I thought that I would return to work even while I was preg­nant with my first son. I had a career, was impor­tant and peo­ple counted on me. Although I might have had the same ideas about ambi­tion, I would never have made such a sweep­ing set of insults against women the world over who have stayed home and raised their chil­dren. Yes, they are insults, Ms. Glass. Ridicu­lous ones at that.

Any­way, the moment I held him… all bets were off.

No meet­ing I could go to, no client, no pre­sen­ta­tion, no job was nearly in the same realm as the respon­si­bil­ity and impor­tance of the lit­tle bun­dle in my arms. I would be will­ing to bet that even moms work­ing out­side the home still con­sider being a mom as their biggest and most impor­tant role. I won’t go into the long list of things I do as a SAHM, but any­one who has done it even for a short time knows SAHMS wear more hats than we can count. SAHM or work­ing mom — it’s not just a job, it’s also role. Just like father, brother, sis­ter, aunt and so on. Moms are a part of the fab­ric that makes up soci­ety — the very one YOU live in. Sorry Ms. Glass, but you’ve read Fem­i­nine Mys­tique one too many times.

Quick Side­note: Fathers mat­ter too, but this piece is about the moms.

You Had Mother

What Ms. Glass brushes off is that Moth­er­hood is the cor­ner­stone of human exis­tence. It’s the prop­a­ga­tion of the species and the shap­ing of those who will make up our soci­ety. The doc­tors and engi­neers? They had moth­ers. The per­son who cre­ated the com­puter that she ham­mered out her self-​loathing screed on? They had a mother. Stay at home mom or work­ing mom — they had one. Even Ms. Glass had one. Imag­ine that.

Jacques Barzun’s pro­logue in From Dawn of Deca­dence sums up the prob­lem with Ms. Glass and her thinking:

“All that is meant by Deca­dence is “falling off”. It implies in those who live in such a time no loss of energy or tal­ent or moral sense. On the con­trary, it is a very active time, full of deep con­cerns, but pecu­liarly rest­less, for it sees no clear lines of advance. The loss it faces is that of Pos­si­bil­ity. The forms of art as life seem exhausted, the stages of devel­op­ment have run through.”

When peo­ple take for granted the pur­suits that make their exis­tence pos­si­ble and then take it one fur­ther by den­i­grat­ing such peo­ple, a soci­ety has become deca­dent. Ms. Glass is the epit­ome of deca­dent. I reject Ms. Glass’ moral con­dem­na­tion of moth­er­hood as she clearly seems to ignore where her own cul­ture and soci­ety come from.

I’m rais­ing my chil­dren and doing it by stay­ing home with them. Suck a lemon, Ms. Glass. I reject your shal­low, improv­i­dent and myopic opin­ion of me and women like me — both past, future and present. In closing:

  • Pro­vid­ing a sta­ble, lov­ing envi­ron­ment with a par­ent present for chil­dren to grow and learn in is not stu­pid, it’s imperative.
  • Rais­ing decent human beings that will par­tic­i­pate and fur­ther our soci­ety and species is def­i­nitely an accomplishment.
  • I’m not con­di­tioned by soci­ety to stay at home and raise my chil­dren. If I’m con­di­tioned, it is by the deci­sion to have them in the first place. Uncon­di­tional love is a hel­luva drug.
  • It is a real job. In fact it is THE real job.

Ms. Glass will never “get” any of this. My chil­dren will and they’ll pass it on.

Related read­ing: Charles C. Cooke takes Ms. Glass to task hand­ily, as does Matt Walsh on the same topic.

A.P. Dil­lon (Lady Lib­erty 1885), is a Con­ser­v­a­tive minded wife and mother liv­ing in the Tri­an­gle area of North Car­olina. A.P. Dil­lon founded the blog LadyLib​er​ty1885​.com in 2009. After the 2012 elec­tion, she added an Instapun­dit style blog called The Con­Mom Blog. Mrs. Dillon’s writ­ing can also be found at Stop​Com​mon​CoreNC​.org, Watch­dog­WireNC and Wiz­Bang. Non-​political writ­ing projects include sci­ence fic­tion novel­las that are, as of yet, unpub­lished. Her cur­rent writ­ing project is a children’s book series.

By A.P. Dillon

Over the weekend, there was another round of Hilary Rosening. By that I mean the disparaging of stay at home moms. This war on women by other women started with Rosen, was picked up by Michelle Goldberg and then again by Elizabeth Wurtzel. The latest to pick up the mantle is a woman named Amy Glass.

This Amy Glass person wrote an article titled, I Look Down On Young Women With Husbands And Kids And I’m Not Sorry. I’m not linking to it.  She doesn’t deserve more than the one click she got out of me already.

You’re probably saying that couldn’t really be the title. No, really. That was the title. You didn’t even have to read it to know what this childless, Ivory tower, I’m-your-better-so- listen-to-me type was going to say.

Here’s the Cliff Notes version of what she thinks about stay at home moms (SAHMS):

  • SAHMS are average and “do nothing”.
  • It’s hiding from the fact SAHMS have “no real accomplishments”.
  • SAHMS are “conditioned” to think what they do is important when in fact, according to Glass, it’s stupid.
  • It’s not a real job. Doctors and engineers are real jobs.

Let me respond to these four points  in kind with the level of sophistication that Ms. Glass displayed: No.

Longer: The level of self-importance and lack of self-awareness in this woman’s article is staggering.  Glass sit there and plays Jenga with the roles of society, ripping out the one that brings the rest of the pieces toppling down.

On Motherhood

As someone who worked before she stayed home, let me enlighten Ms. Glass.  I’m possibly her worst nightmare since I am college educated and worked in the corporate world for over a decade before having a child. In fact, I have two now. Ya know what? I LOVE STAYING HOME WITH MY KIDS. *gasp* It’s the most rewarding thing I’ve ever done. You’re a fool.

It should be noted that I still recognize to this day that there are women who chose to work outside the home instead of being stay at home – that’s fine and that is their choice. By the same token, some of them have to work outside the home, some don’t. Either way, it’s their choice. I made a choice too and that was to raise my children. Contrary to Ms. Glass’ point of view: Women do have choices.  These choices shouldn’t be disparaged, but should be celebrated. Perhaps it’s that very fact we have choices that ticks her off so bad — we’re not choosing as she has.

I thought a bit like Ms. Glass before having kids. In fact, I thought that I would return to work even while I was pregnant with my first son.  I had a career, was important and people counted on me. Although I might have had the same ideas about ambition, I would never have made such a sweeping set of insults against women the world over who have stayed home and raised their children. Yes, they are insults, Ms. Glass. Ridiculous ones at that.

Anyway, the moment I held him… all bets were off.

No meeting I could go to, no client, no presentation, no job was nearly in the same realm as the responsibility and importance of the little bundle in my arms. I would be willing to bet that even moms working outside the home still consider being a mom as their biggest and most important role.  I won’t go into the long list of things I do as a SAHM, but anyone who has done it even for a short time knows SAHMS wear more hats than we can count.  SAHM or working mom — it’s not just a job, it’s also role. Just like father, brother, sister, aunt and so on. Moms are a part of the fabric that makes up society – the very one YOU live in. Sorry Ms. Glass, but you’ve read Feminine Mystique one too many times. 

Quick Sidenote: Fathers matter too, but this piece is about the moms.

 

You Had Mother

What Ms. Glass brushes off is that Motherhood is the cornerstone of human existence. It’s the propagation of the species and the shaping of those who will make up our society.  The doctors and engineers? They had mothers. The person who created the computer that she hammered out her self-loathing screed on? They had a mother. Stay at home mom or working mom – they had one. Even Ms. Glass had one. Imagine that.

Jacques Barzun’s  prologue in From Dawn of Decadence sums up the problem with Ms. Glass and her thinking:

“All that is meant by Decadence is “falling off”. It implies in those who live in such a time no loss of energy or talent or moral sense. On the contrary, it is a very active time, full of deep concerns, but peculiarly restless, for it sees no clear lines of advance. The loss it faces is that of Possibility. The forms of art as life seem exhausted, the stages of development have run through.”

 

When people take for granted the pursuits that make their existence possible and then take it one further by denigrating such people, a society has become decadent. Ms. Glass is the epitome of decadent.  I reject Ms. Glass’ moral condemnation of motherhood as she clearly seems to ignore where her own culture and society come from.

I’m raising my children and doing it by staying home with them. Suck a lemon, Ms. Glass. I reject your shallow, improvident and myopic opinion of me and women like me – both past, future and present. In closing:

  • Providing a stable, loving environment with a parent present for children to grow and learn in is not stupid, it’s imperative.
  • Raising decent human beings that will participate and further our society and species is definitely an accomplishment.
  • I’m not conditioned by society to stay at home and raise my children. If I’m conditioned, it is by the decision to have them in the first place. Unconditional love is a helluva drug.
  • It is a real job. In fact it is THE real job.

Ms. Glass will never “get” any of this. My children will and they’ll pass it on.

 

Related readingCharles C. Cooke takes Ms. Glass to task handily, as does Matt Walsh on the same topic.

 

A.P. Dillon (Lady Liberty 1885), is a Conservative minded wife and mother living in the Triangle area of North Carolina. A.P. Dillon founded the blog LadyLiberty1885.com in 2009. After the 2012 election, she added an Instapundit style blog called The ConMom Blog. Mrs. Dillon’s writing can also be found at StopCommonCoreNC.org, WatchdogWireNC and WizBang. Non-political writing projects include science fiction novellas that are, as of yet, unpublished. Her current writing project is a children’s book series.

Buy My Book!

Buy My Book!

Hit DaTipJar and Support Conservative Journalism & Opinion




Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,146 other subscribers

DH Gate Dot Com, Online Shopping

Cheap ecigarette from China - DHgate

Best Grassroots Blogs

Winner - 2014 Fabulous 50 Blog Awards

Catholic CD of the Month

Know your Catholic Faith

Da Pages

Winner - 2014 Fabulous 50 Blog Awards

Donald Trump Calls on DaTechGuy Worcester MA

 
%d bloggers like this: