February jobs report – good against only expectations

by Steve Eggleston | March 8th, 2014

Readability

February jobs report - good against only expectations

By Steve Eggleston

Yes­ter­day, the Feb­ru­ary jobs report was released. On a seasonally-​adjusted basis, the econ­omy added 175,000 jobs, with 162,000 com­ing in the pri­vate sector.

Mean­while, the unem­ploy­ment rate ticked up by 0.1 per­cent­age points to 6.7% as 264,000 peo­ple entered or re-​entered the work­force and employ­ment increased by only 42,000. That was not enough to move either the Labor Force Par­tic­i­pa­tion Rate or the Employment-​Population Ratio from January’s historically-​low 63.0% LFPR and 58.8EPR.

Econ­o­mists had expected roughly 150,000 jobs added with cold weather affect­ing the num­bers, with those tak­ing the weak eco­nomic news from the ADP pay­roll report and the ISM Ser­vices report into account pre­dict­ing even fewer jobs added. Despite the stronger-​than-​expected toplines, Reuters didn’t dis­ap­point the weather alarmists, blam­ing the cold for a drop in the num­ber of hours worked.

Even though the toplines were bet­ter than expected, the report itself threw cold water on those who thought it was a great num­ber (empha­sis added):

Estab­lish­ment Sur­vey Data

Total non­farm pay­roll employ­ment rose by 175,000 in Feb­ru­ary. Job growth aver­aged 189,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Fur­ther, Tom Blumer found the results want­ing com­pared to his­tory. On a seasonally-​unadjusted basis, the 750,000 total jobs and 300,000 private-​sector jobs rep­re­sent the worst Feb­ru­ary since 2010, which was also the last month that there was a loss of jobs on a seasonally-​adjusted basis.

The phe­nom­e­non of a sig­nif­i­cant increase in jobs in Feb­ru­ary is a relatively-​recent one, going back only to 1995. This February’s 0.52% increase, while a bit bet­ter than the mean aver­age of 0.51% between 1995 and 2013, is in the bot­tom half of per­for­mances and worse than the median of 0.54%.

What isn’t a recent phe­nom­e­non is the February-​June hir­ing spree Tom talked about. The num­ber of jobs increased by an aver­age of 2.70% in those months between 1948 and 2013. While the prior 3 years were a bit bet­ter than that, if things con­tinue the way they went last month, the econ­omy will be strug­gling to increase the num­ber of jobs by 2% in that stretch.

By Steve Eggleston

Yesterday, the February jobs report was released. On a seasonally-adjusted basis, the economy added 175,000 jobs, with 162,000 coming in the private sector.

Meanwhile, the unemployment rate ticked up by 0.1 percentage points to 6.7% as 264,000 people entered or re-entered the workforce and employment increased by only 42,000. That was not enough to move either the Labor Force Participation Rate or the Employment-Population Ratio from January’s historically-low 63.0% LFPR and 58.8% EPR.

Economists had expected roughly 150,000 jobs added with cold weather affecting the numbers, with those taking the weak economic news from the ADP payroll report and the ISM Services report into account predicting even fewer jobs added. Despite the stronger-than-expected toplines, Reuters didn’t disappoint the weather alarmists, blaming the cold for a drop in the number of hours worked.

Even though the toplines were better than expected, the report itself threw cold water on those who thought it was a great number (emphasis added):

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 175,000 in February. Job growth averaged 189,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Further, Tom Blumer found the results wanting compared to history. On a seasonally-unadjusted basis, the 750,000 total jobs and 300,000 private-sector jobs represent the worst February since 2010, which was also the last month that there was a loss of jobs on a seasonally-adjusted basis.

The phenomenon of a significant increase in jobs in February is a relatively-recent one, going back only to 1995. This February’s 0.52% increase, while a bit better than the mean average of 0.51% between 1995 and 2013, is in the bottom half of performances and worse than the median of 0.54%.

What isn’t a recent phenomenon is the February-June hiring spree Tom talked about. The number of jobs increased by an average of 2.70% in those months between 1948 and 2013. While the prior 3 years were a bit better than that, if things continue the way they went last month, the economy will be struggling to increase the number of jobs by 2% in that stretch.

Comments are closed.

Buy Raspberry Ketone Here

American 023

From a Former Atheist:

From a Former Atheist:

Try the Double Burger!

nashoba

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester

Annies Book Stop of Worcester 001

Find Discounts at the Stores you Love

TOP STORES

Listen to your Granny

RWG

Forest of Assassins

Forest of Assassins

DH Gate Dot Com, Online Shopping

ecigarette

Support our favorite Charties

Read me at Examiner.com

Examiner badge2

Only 114 Million Hits to retirement!

Most Innovative Blogger 2013

Most Innovative Blogger 2013

Tags

Help a Brother Knight of Mine who needs a hand