Just a reminder while the day off, the marathon and the early Red Sox game are all fun it’s important to remember why there is a Patriots day.

It should not be forgotten Patriots day is all about the British marching on Concord and Massachusetts men later augmented by folk from Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Connecticut answered the call to arms to oppose a tyrannical government that had overstepped it’s bounds to oppress the people it was meant to serve.

Here is a contemporary account excepted from Albert Bushnell Hart’s spectacular American History Told by Contemporaries, Vol. II: Building of the Republic,

Salem, April 25, 1775.

Last Wednesday, the 19th of April, the Troops of His Britannick Majesty commenced hostilities upon the people of this Province, attended with circumstances of cruelty, not less brutal than what our venerable ancestors received from the vilest Savages of the wilderness. The particulars relative to this interesting event, by which we are involved in all the horrours of a civil war, we have endeavoured to collect as well as the present confused state of affairs will admit.

read the rest here

FYI Hart’s series should be required reading for anyone who wants to talk intelligently about US history in the 19th century or before.

Lindaby Linda Szugyi

Where was I? Oh yes, The Fordham Institute’s Common Core Movie Fact Sheet, and its thirteen rebuttals to points made in the anti-Common Core movie, Building the Machine.

I covered the first two points last week.  On to Fordham Institute’s point and rebuttal number three:

3.  “ASSERTION: ‘THE COMMON CORE DISINCENTIVIZES PARENT INVOLVEMENT. IT STOPS PARENTS FROM A DEEP AND ABIDING INTEREST IN THEIR CHILD’S EDUCATION.’  FACT: WITH STANDARDS, PARENTS CAN CLEARLY ASSESS IF THEIR CHILD IS BEING CHALLENGED TO GAIN THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NEEDED TO SUCCEED IN COLLEGE OR CAREER.”

The problem here is the assumption that all standards are helpful.  Of course, generally speaking, people can better track their progress in anything–education, building a house, or cooking a stew, as examples–if they have some instructions to follow and some checkpoints to compare.

But come on.  Which is going to be the easier stew recipe to follow?  The plain-written one, or the one that carries on ad nauseam about the level of seasoning complexity, the integration of tubers and nightshades, and the importance of having diverse ingredients?

In order for standards to be helpful to parents, they first have to be readable.  Yet, the Common Core Standards are phrased in as verbose and convoluted a manner as possible.  Have a look at them, if you haven’t yet.  Even simple things like listening and holding a conversation are expressed in complex, high-sounding terminology.

Phony claptrap may intimidate some parents, but it shouldn’t.  It should be derided as just another from of legalese.  We can call it “expertese.”  As a culture, we’ve been ceding authority to the self-appointed experts of child-rearing and education for far too long.  Our experts have turned into naked emperors.

The unnamed author of the Fact Sheet feebly attempts to support the dubious FACT #3 (parents can clearly assess their children with Common Core Standards), by reminding us that states had their own standards before Common Core, and parents didn’t complain about them.

parts is parts Wendy's ad“What’s the big deal?  Standards are standards,” seems to be the implicit argument.  I’m reminded of that old Wendy’s ad about the competitors’ chicken sandwich:  Parts is parts!

In this one regard, the Fact Sheet is correct.  We should have been complaining about our ridiculously unhelpful state standards.  It took the foisting of a national set of unhelpful standards for us to sit up and take notice.  As I’ve said before, Common Core doesn’t invent the lousy education, it just nationally standardizes it.

The most interesting part of the Fact Sheet’s argument in #3 is an off-hand use of the word “knowledge”:

“The existence of standards enables parents to clearly track if their child is gaining the necessary knowledge and skills to be ready for college or career.”

Gaining the necessary knowledge?  I have noticed that the Common Core Standards don’t cover knowledge; they only cover skills.  Therein lies the basis for the oft-repeated claim that Common Core does not influence the curricula, i.e., the substance of the information taught in the classroom.  Therein also lies their pointless nature, for the skills they purport to assess are skills that humans tend to naturally acquire in the process of attaining knowledge.

Whether the knowledge is gained from experience or books, the skill to apply that knowledge is an innate part of the human experience.  The question then becomes, what bodies of knowledge will best hone the natural human tendency to apply knowledge by creating, by making decisions, and by communicating with others?

To answer this question, Common Core has suggested texts in Appendix B.  Analyzation of these suggestions is best left for another time, and in fact has already been done by Terrence O. Moore.  You really should buy his book.  It’s called “The Story-Killers” for a reason.  Suffice it to say that the folks who publish “Common Core-aligned” textbooks think it’s more important for high schoolers to read a Saturday Night Live parody of Frankenstein than it is to actually, you know, read the classic novel itself.

Wow.  Class is over already, and I covered only #3 of the thirteen “assertions and facts” in the Fordham Institute’s “Fact Sheet.”  I’ll have to pick up with #4 next week.  Just remember, learning is an innate part of being human, but the traditional school experience has a tendency to crush it.

Here’s my bio.  I am an over-educated, stay-at-home-mom who is only just now learning how to be a life-long learner.  I’m finishing up my second year of  experimenting upon homeschooling my two boys, who are currently 6th and 3rd graders, and I’m well fed-up with experts who have no common sense.  If you enjoy Da Tech Guy’s blog but have not yet subscribed, please do so.  That is all.

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On this Marathon Monday I can’t do better than Michael Graham here

If you aren’t familiar with the Pelletier case, look here and here.

And you should read this too.

If I was in another state you couldn’t pay me to take my child to children’s hospital or any Massachusetts hospital for treatment

Exit Question: Can someone explain to me why Charlie Baker isn’t running hard on this?

Update: Maybe the Pelletiers can get Harry Reid to call them “Domestic Terrorists” then they would get the same visitation rights as Boston Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

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Olimometer 2.52

This blog exists as a full time endeavor thanks to your support.

The reporting, the commentary and the nine magnificent seven writers are all made possible because you, the reader choose to support it.

For a full month of all of what we provide ,we ask a fixed amount $1465, under $50 a day.

This month we are behind, but we can make our goal if we can get $119 from this day till the end of the month. That’s 5 $25 Tip jar hits.

Jesus said  laborer deserves his payment.  (Lk 10:7) If you think the work we do here for the conservative movement is worth it, please consider hitting DaTipJar below .

Naturally once our monthly goal is made these solicitations will disappear till the next month but once we get 61 more subscribers  at $20 a month the goal will be covered for a full year and this pitch will disappear until 2015.

Consider the lineup you get for this price, in addition to my own work seven days a week you get John Ruberry (Marathon Pundit) and Pat Austin (And so it goes in Shreveport)  on Sunday  Linda Szugyi (No one of any import) on Monday  Tim Imholt on Tuesday,  AP Dillon (Lady Liberty1885) Thursdays, Pastor George Kelly Fridays,   Steve Eggleston on Saturdays with  Baldilocks (Tue & Sat)  and   Fausta  (Wed & Fri) of (Fausta Blog) twice a week.

If that’s not worth $20 a month I’d like to know what is?