Freedom Is Never Really Free

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Freedom Is Never Really Free

More than 225 years ago, a great Amer­i­can Patriot by the name of Patrick Henry uttered these words that still live on in the Amer­i­can con­scious­ness: “Give Me Lib­erty, or Give Me Death!”

Sir Patrick Henry’s clar­ion call to fight Great Britain and to cast of the colo­nial bonds to the mother coun­try helped to rally the will of the Amer­i­can colonists as they engaged in a 7 year bat­tle that would cul­mi­nate in the birth of a new nation.

Con­se­quently, the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion (1776 to 1783) while the first time this new nation fought for its free­dom, it would not be the last.

Fast for­ward­ing to 1812, one would see that the United States of Amer­ica – barely 36 years old — would end up in a fight with Great Britain over land and bor­der dis­putes with what is now Canada that went very badly. This fight with Eng­land was dubbed The War of 1812.

The President’s Exec­u­tive Offices were burned to the ground and some his­to­ri­ans argue that the British nearly beat the United States which would have ended the young nation’s young and unique exper­i­ment in “ordered liberty.”

The United States recov­ered from the War of 1812 shaken, but some­what intact.

Over the next 45 to 50 years, the United States of Amer­ica would greatly expand west­ward as the orig­i­nal 13 states would swell to more than 35 in the Ante-​bellum South. Yet, there was another bat­tle for free­dom brew­ing under the sur­face as roughly 4 mil­lion Negro slaves were not allowed to par­take in the bless­ings of liberty.

The United States would fight an inter­nal bat­tle in which nearly 600,000 peo­ple would per­ish from 1860 through 1865 as the nation was forced to deal with the per­ni­cious results of what they called “the pecu­liar insti­tu­tion” (slavery).

The United Sates passed the 13th Amend­ment to the Con­sti­tu­tion and Negro Slav­ery was abol­ished (although it would take 100 more years to destroy the last “legal ves­tiges” of Amer­i­can Apartheid).

The early part of the 20th Cen­tury would see the United States enter the Euro­pean and World the­ater dur­ing World War I (WWI).

The rea­son for the entry of the United States into this inter­na­tional frawy was artic­u­lated by the then US Pres­i­dent Woodrow Wil­son as an endeavor “ to make the world safe for democ­racy.” More than 115,000 Amer­i­cans died in this effort to free Europe from tyranny (19171918) and “to make the world safe for democracy.”

Indeed, (WWI) left a bit­ter taste in the hearts and minds of many Americans.

More than a few United States cit­i­zens remem­bered the words of Pres­i­dent George Wash­ing­ton warn­ing us not to get entan­gled in Euro­pean affairs. Many Amer­i­cans of that gen­er­a­tion thought that (WWI) was the last major global conflict.

How wrong they were!

Only a few short years later, the Amer­i­can pub­lic would be aroused again as the Japan­ese would attack Pearl Har­bor on Decem­ber 7th 1941 and pro­voke the United States to enter into World War II (WWII). Our involve­ment with the Sec­ond World War was a long and tedious strug­gle of 4 long years with more than 9 mil­lion sol­diers deployed.

The Women in the United States con­tributed bril­liantly to the War effort as they worked the fac­to­ries, pro­duced muni­tion, took care of the fam­i­lies — and played Soft­ball to enter­tain the Amer­i­can pub­lic as our national pas­time of base­ball was interrupted.

Today we cel­e­brate the great­est bat­tle to lib­er­ate Europe in what his­to­ri­ans referred to as “D-​Day” or The Bat­tle of Normandy.

The Allies were blessed by The Hand of Prov­i­dence with great polit­i­cal and mil­i­tary lead­ers dur­ing the World War II timeframe.

In the United States and in Great Britain, Pres­i­dent Franklin D. Roo­sevelt and Prime Min­is­ter Sir Win­ston Churchill pro­vided their nations and the allied coun­tries with an unswerv­ing and absolute com­mit­ment to “Total Victory.”

Fur­ther­more, mag­nif­i­cent mil­i­tary lead­ers such as The Supreme Allied Com­man­der Dwight D. Eisen­hower and the phe­nom­e­nal British Gen­eral Bernard Mont­gomery pro­vided strate­gic bril­liance, out­stand­ing resolve and courage — and charisma under the harsh­est of conditions.

The United States and the free world did not get a break after the Sec­ond World War ended. The United States emerged as the World’s strongest Eco­nomic and Mil­i­tary power, but was reminded time and time again “that with great power comes great responsibility.”

The United States ended WWII by enter­ing into a 70 year pro­tracted bat­tle against world com­mu­nism against a for­mer (WWII) ally: Rus­sia or The Soviet Union!

Our nation learned the hard way – through the global con­flicts of the 20th cen­tury — that “free­dom is never truly free.”

A free peo­ple MUST ALWAYS be will­ing to sac­ri­fice and lay down their lives for the peo­ple, prin­ci­ples, and life pur­pose that they cherish.

Today we cel­e­brate the 70th Anniver­sary of D-​Day and the accom­plish­ments of “the Great­est Gen­er­a­tion” (although they sim­ply saw them­selves as citizen-​soldiers who were fight­ing for free­dom and for the nation that they loved).

Hope­fully, we will fight with the same deter­mi­na­tion and brav­ery – when­ever called upon that was greatly man­i­fested by the men and women of the (WWII) generation.

We thank GOD for rais­ing up men and women of such amaz­ing for­ti­tude. May GOD richly bless them and their fam­i­lies for their incal­cu­la­ble sacrifices.

More than 225 years ago, a great American Patriot by the name of Patrick Henry uttered these words that still live on in the American consciousness: “Give Me Liberty, or Give Me Death!”

Sir Patrick Henry’s clarion call to fight Great Britain and to cast of the colonial bonds to the mother country helped to rally the will of the American colonists as they engaged in a 7 year battle that would culminate in the birth of a new nation.

Consequently, the American Revolution (1776 to 1783) while the first time this new nation fought for its freedom, it would not be the last.

Fast forwarding to 1812, one would see that the United States of America – barely 36 years old – would end up in a fight with Great Britain over land and border disputes with what is now Canada that went very badly. This fight with England was dubbed The War of 1812.

The President’s Executive Offices were burned to the ground and some historians argue that the British nearly beat the United States which would have ended the young nation’s young and unique experiment in “ordered liberty.”

The United States recovered from the War of 1812 shaken, but somewhat intact.

Over the next 45 to 50 years, the United States of America would greatly expand westward as the original 13 states would swell to more than 35 in the Ante-bellum South. Yet, there was another battle for freedom brewing under the surface as roughly 4 million Negro slaves were not allowed to partake in the blessings of liberty.

The United States would fight an internal battle in which nearly 600,000 people would perish from 1860 through 1865 as the nation was forced to deal with the pernicious results of what they called “the peculiar institution” (slavery).

The United Sates passed the 13th Amendment to the Constitution and Negro Slavery was abolished (although it would take 100 more years to destroy the last “legal vestiges” of American Apartheid).

The early part of the 20th Century would see the United States enter the European and World theater during World War I (WWI).

The reason for the entry of the United States into this international frawy was articulated by the then US President Woodrow Wilson as an endeavor  “ to make the world safe for democracy.” More than 115,000 Americans died in this effort to free Europe from tyranny (1917 – 1918) and “to make the world safe for democracy.”

Indeed, (WWI) left a bitter taste in the hearts and minds of many Americans.

More than a few United States citizens remembered the words of President George Washington warning us not to get entangled in European affairs. Many Americans of that generation thought that (WWI) was the last major global conflict.

How wrong they were!

Only a few short years later, the American public would be aroused again as the Japanese would attack Pearl Harbor on December 7th 1941 and provoke the United States to enter into World War II (WWII).  Our involvement with the Second World War was a long and tedious struggle of 4 long years with more than 9 million soldiers deployed.

The Women in the United States contributed brilliantly to the War effort as they worked the factories, produced munition, took care of the families – and played Softball to entertain the American public as our national pastime of baseball was interrupted.

Today we celebrate the greatest battle to liberate Europe in what historians referred to as “D-Day” or The Battle of Normandy.

The Allies were blessed by The Hand of Providence with great political and military leaders during the World War II timeframe.

In the United States and in Great Britain, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill provided their nations and the allied countries with an unswerving and absolute commitment to “Total Victory.”

Furthermore, magnificent military leaders such as The Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower and the phenomenal British General Bernard Montgomery provided strategic brilliance, outstanding resolve and courage – and charisma under the harshest of conditions.

The United States and the free world did not get a break after the Second World War ended. The United States emerged as the World’s strongest Economic and Military power, but was reminded time and time again “that with great power comes great responsibility.”

The United States ended WWII by entering into a 70 year protracted battle against world communism against a former (WWII) ally: Russia or The Soviet Union!

Our nation learned the hard way – through the global conflicts of the 20th century – that “freedom is never truly free.”

A free people MUST ALWAYS be willing to sacrifice and lay down their lives for the people, principles, and life purpose that they cherish.

Today we celebrate the 70th Anniversary of D-Day and the accomplishments of “the Greatest Generation” (although they simply saw themselves as citizen-soldiers who were fighting for freedom and for the nation that they loved).

Hopefully, we will fight with the same determination and bravery – whenever called upon that was greatly manifested by the men and women of the (WWII) generation.

We thank GOD for raising up men and women of such amazing fortitude.  May GOD richly bless them and their families for their incalculable sacrifices.