Communism at work: Give up your car

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Communism at work: Give up your car

by Fausta Rodriguez Wertz

Com­mu­nism is all about con­trol. Noth­ing the indi­vid­ual does can be allowed; every­thing is done for the pur­pose of con­sol­i­dat­ing power around the rul­ing elite and no one else.

Of course, things like guns and auto­mo­biles are anath­ema to the Com­mu­nist. Both grant the indi­vid­ual a degree of inde­pen­dence and self-​reliance that can actively be used against the whims of the powerful.

I’ll leave the dis­cus­sion on guns for another time. Let’s talk about cars now.

Cars would not have been pos­si­ble with­out cap­i­tal­ism: Com­pe­ti­tion, cre­ativ­ity, inven­tion, tech­nol­ogy, artistry, crafts­man­ship, all are brought together from free enter­prise cre­at­ing the mon­e­tary means to develop, pur­chase, deliver — and, for the con­sumer — buy the car.

Cars speak of free­dom: free­dom of move­ment, free­dom of choice, free­dom to hit the road when you best feel like it, free­dom to buy, lease, keep, sell, or trade up your car.

Cars speak of indi­vid­u­al­ism: You can per­son­al­ize your car, or not, as you best see fit.

No won­der Com­mu­nists hate hav­ing the hoi-​polloi own cars.

Real Com­mu­nists want to be the only ones in the cars, not the great unwashed tying up traf­fic and pol­lut­ing the air. For decades we’ve been sub­jected to hog­wash about “Cuba’s clas­sic, beau­ti­ful cars,” i.e., the remain­ing 1950s jalop­ies the Cuban pop­u­lace must make do with since, a. the Com­mu­nists keep peo­ple poor, and b. the country’s broke. The use­ful idiots prais­ing the jalop­ies can admire clas­sic vin­tage cars any time they want from the com­fort of their pros­per­ous soci­eties (since none of them actu­ally have to scrounge in Havana for parts with which they may keep their own jalop­ies run­ning), while simul­ta­ne­ously ignor­ing that Fidel Cas­tro owned dozens of limos, some of which are now being used as taxis in Havana. To add insult to injury, one of the arti­cles talk­ing about Fidel’s old limos says,

The new fleet will give tourists a quirky and light­hearted look at Cuba’s history.

I leave it to you, gen­tle reader to decide whether half a cen­tury of mis­ery in the island-​prison deserves “a quirky and light­hearted look.”

Venezuela’s Cuba-​appointed dic­ta­tor, Nico­las Maduro, is hell-​bent on fol­low­ing Fidel’s foot­steps, so, of course, the coun­try is a wreck as chav­ismo con­tin­ues to rip off the pri­vate econ­omy for well over a decade.

While the rul­ing chav­is­tas enrich them­selves, the coun­try went beg­ging to the Chi­nese for a bailout. Like the rest of the coun­try, the auto indus­try — in a coun­try where gaso­line is six cents per gal­lon — is brought to a stand­still:
Venezuela’s Car Cul­ture Fades
Pro­duc­tion is dry­ing up as big auto mak­ers can’t obtain dol­lars to pay parts sup­pli­ers and sky-​high infla­tion turns older cars into invest­ment vehicles.

The car indus­try this year began on a par­tic­u­larly dire note, with only Toy­ota and Volvo AB’s Mack de Venezuela pow­er­ing up their assem­bly lines. By March, Toy­ota halted pro­duc­tion for three months, fol­lowed by Ital­ian truck maker Iveco SpA in April. Ford, GM and Chrysler rolled back pro­duc­tion amid big losses due to cur­rency deval­u­a­tions as Pres­i­dent Nicolás Maduro’s gov­ern­ment tried to address a short­age of dol­lars by weak­en­ing the value of the bolívar.

Behold, the assem­bly line:

But fear not: chav­is­tas ride on, in bullet-​proof cars.

LINKED TO by Babalu Blog. Thank you!

LINKED TO by The Lonely Con­ser­v­a­tive. Thank you!

faustaFausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s Blog.

by Fausta Rodriguez Wertz

Communism is all about control. Nothing the individual does can be allowed;  everything is done for the purpose of consolidating power around the ruling elite and no one else.

Of course, things like guns and automobiles are anathema to the Communist. Both grant the individual a degree of independence and self-reliance that can actively be used against the whims of the powerful.

I’ll leave the discussion on guns for another time. Let’s talk about cars now.

Cars would not have been possible without capitalism: Competition, creativity, invention, technology, artistry, craftsmanship, all are brought together from free enterprise creating the monetary means to develop, purchase, deliver – and, for the consumer – buy the car.

Cars speak of freedom: freedom of movement, freedom of choice, freedom to hit the road when you best feel like it, freedom to buy, lease, keep, sell, or trade up your car.

Cars speak of individualism: You can personalize your car, or not, as you best see fit.

No wonder Communists hate having the hoi-polloi own cars.

Real Communists want to be the only ones in the cars, not the great unwashed tying up traffic and polluting the air. For decades we’ve been subjected to hogwash about “Cuba’s classic, beautiful cars,” i.e., the remaining 1950s jalopies the Cuban populace must make do with since, a. the Communists keep people poor, and b. the country’s broke. The useful idiots praising the jalopies can admire classic vintage cars any time they want from the comfort of their prosperous societies (since none of them actually have to scrounge in Havana for parts with which they may keep their own jalopies running), while simultaneously ignoring that Fidel Castro owned dozens of limos, some of which are now being used as taxis in Havana. To add insult to injury, one of the articles talking about Fidel’s old limos says,

The new fleet will give tourists a quirky and lighthearted look at Cuba’s history.

I leave it to you, gentle reader to decide whether half a century of misery in the island-prison deserves “a quirky and lighthearted look.”

Venezuela’s Cuba-appointed dictator, Nicolas Maduro, is hell-bent on following Fidel’s footsteps, so, of course, the country is a wreck as chavismo continues to rip off the private economy for well over a decade.

While the ruling chavistas enrich themselves, the country went begging to the Chinese for a bailout. Like the rest of the country, the auto industry – in a country where gasoline is six cents per gallon – is brought to a standstill:
Venezuela’s Car Culture Fades
Production is drying up as big auto makers can’t obtain dollars to pay parts suppliers and sky-high inflation turns older cars into investment vehicles.

The car industry this year began on a particularly dire note, with only Toyota and Volvo AB’s Mack de Venezuela powering up their assembly lines. By March, Toyota halted production for three months, followed by Italian truck maker Iveco SpA in April. Ford, GM and Chrysler rolled back production amid big losses due to currency devaluations as President Nicolás Maduro’s government tried to address a shortage of dollars by weakening the value of the bolívar.

Behold, the assembly line:

But fear not: chavistas ride on, in bullet-proof cars.

LINKED TO by Babalu Blog. Thank you!

LINKED TO by The Lonely Conservative. Thank you!

faustaFausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.