What makes the Market Basket Protest Unique?

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What makes the Market Basket Protest Unique?

If you want to under­stand how unique the Mar­ket Bas­ket protest is lis­ten to this WBUR inter­view with one of the pro­test­ers who has been fired after 41 years at the store

You might note the entire argu­ment of the fired worker con­cern­ing the good of the busi­ness & the old CEO who made it a suc­cess. business.

Then there is this quote from the story empha­sis mine:

Some Mass­a­chu­setts law­mak­ers have called for a boy­cott of the com­pany, led by state Sen. Barry Fine­gold, D-​Andover, whose dis­trict includes the company’s head­quar­ters in Tewks­bury. As of Mon­day, 37 state law­mak­ers and may­ors had agreed to encour­age con­stituents to stop shop­ping at Mar­ket Bas­ket until Arthur T. Demoulas is rein­stated, said Fine­gold, who attended Monday’s rally.

“I’ve never seen a rally where work­ers are not ask­ing for more wages or ben­e­fits. All they are ask­ing for is the rein­state­ment of the per­son that’s been run­ning this com­pany,” Fine­gold said. “It’s about keep­ing the cul­ture of this com­pany they’ve built that’s ben­e­fited so many all these years. So many peo­ple are pay­check to pay­check. If you can save 10 per­cent of your food bill, it’s a big deal.”

That’s likely why only 37 law­mak­ers have come out for the work­ers in a state where democ­rats have over 175 mem­bers in the house and sen­ate. Why are the rest hold­ing back? Here is a clue.

Fired Mar­ket Bas­ket employ­ees yes­ter­day rebuffed offers of legal advice from the Team­sters, say­ing the sol­i­dar­ity of the Tewks­bury gro­cery chain’s work­ers — from top exec­u­tives to store bag­gers — is stronger than any union.

It’s not our way of doing things,” said for­mer facil­i­ties and oper­a­tions super­vi­sor Steve Paulenka, among eight senior work­ers canned this past week­end for their allegedly dis­rup­tive roles in orga­niz­ing an employee push for for­mer CEO Arthur T. Demoulas’ rehir­ing. “We really take care of our­selves. We don’t need a union.”

I’ve heard this sen­ti­ment from every Mar­ket Bas­ket per­son I’ve talked to from man­agers to bag­gers they don’t want a union and it was made plain dur­ing the protest

When word got out at a Fri­day rally at Mar­ket Bas­ket head­quar­ters that rep­re­sen­ta­tives of an uniden­ti­fied union were pass­ing out cards to protest­ing employ­ees, it was Trainor who responded: “Really, do you think we need a union?” The crowd responded with a resound­ing “no.”

There is no union in this coun­try that’s stronger than this crowd right here,” Trainor said. “So take your cards and go home.”

So basi­cally you have a work­force not com­plain­ing about wages, not com­plain­ing about work­ing con­di­tions, not call­ing for a union but instead protest­ing against busi­ness deci­sions that they believe will hurt long term profitability.

There is one way to describe a protest like that: Pro Cap­i­tal­ist.

That’s why it will never get the approval of the National MSM. If that kind of idea spreads, watch out.

If you want to understand how unique the Market Basket protest is listen to this WBUR interview with one of the protesters who has been fired after 41 years at the store

You might note the entire argument of the fired worker concerning the good of the business & the old CEO who made it a success. business.

Then there is this quote from the story emphasis mine:

Some Massachusetts lawmakers have called for a boycott of the company, led by state Sen. Barry Finegold, D-Andover, whose district includes the company’s headquarters in Tewksbury. As of Monday, 37 state lawmakers and mayors had agreed to encourage constituents to stop shopping at Market Basket until Arthur T. Demoulas is reinstated, said Finegold, who attended Monday’s rally.

“I’ve never seen a rally where workers are not asking for more wages or benefits. All they are asking for is the reinstatement of the person that’s been running this company,” Finegold said. “It’s about keeping the culture of this company they’ve built that’s benefited so many all these years. So many people are paycheck to paycheck. If you can save 10 percent of your food bill, it’s a big deal.”

That’s likely why only 37 lawmakers have come out for the workers in a state where democrats have over 175 members in the house and senate. Why are the rest holding back? Here is a clue.

Fired Market Basket employees yesterday rebuffed offers of legal advice from the Teamsters, saying the solidarity of the Tewksbury grocery chain’s workers — from top executives to store baggers — is stronger than any union.

“It’s not our way of doing things,” said former facilities and operations supervisor Steve Paulenka, among eight senior workers canned this past weekend for their allegedly disruptive roles in organizing an employee push for former CEO Arthur T. Demoulas’ rehiring. “We really take care of ourselves. We don’t need a union.”

I’ve heard this sentiment from every Market Basket person I’ve talked to from managers to baggers they don’t want a union and it was made plain during the protest

When word got out at a Friday rally at Market Basket headquarters that representatives of an unidentified union were passing out cards to protesting employees, it was Trainor who responded: “Really, do you think we need a union?” The crowd responded with a resounding “no.”

“There is no union in this country that’s stronger than this crowd right here,” Trainor said. “So take your cards and go home.”

So basically you have a workforce not complaining about wages, not complaining about working conditions, not calling for a union but instead protesting against business decisions that they believe will hurt long term profitability.

There is one way to describe a protest like that: Pro Capitalist.

That’s why it will never get the approval of the National MSM. If that kind of idea spreads, watch out.