August jobs report – Can’t hide the decline

Readability

August jobs report - Can't hide the decline

By Steve Eggleston

Yes­ter­day, the Bureau of Labor Sta­tis­tics released the August jobs report, and the news was not good. The seasonally-​adjusted 144,000 non-​farm jobs added, with 134,000 in the pri­vate sec­tor, broke the 8-​month streak of at least 200,000 jobs added per month, and was unex­pect­edly worse than the expert con­sen­sus of 220,000230,000 jobs added. The prior two months’ worth of jobs gains were revised down by a net 28,000.

Mean­while, even though the unem­ploy­ment rate fell by 0.1 per­cent­age points to 6.1%, that was due almost exclu­sively to more peo­ple depart­ing the work­force. Only 16,000 more peo­ple were employed on a seasonally-​adjusted basis in August, while the labor force declined by 64,000. That drove the seasonally-​adjusted labor force par­tic­i­pa­tion rate back down to its multi-​generational low of 62.8%, a level that, prior to Octo­ber 2013 (and again in Decem­ber 2013, April 2014, May 2014 and June 2014), was last seen in March 1978. The seasonally-​adjusted employment-​population ratio remained stuck at 59.0% for the third con­sec­u­tive month, a level not seen between Feb­ru­ary 1984 and August 2009.

As usual, the deeper one digs into the num­bers, the worse the news gets. Once again, there is a dis­con­nect between the esta­bil­sh­ment sur­vey, from which the jobs num­bers come and the house­hold sur­vey, from which the unem­ploy­ment num­bers come. On a seasonally-​adjusted basis, while there were 354,000 non-​farm jobs added since June per the estab­lish­ment sur­vey, there were 168,000 fewer peo­ple work­ing in non-​farm jobs in August than in June per the house­hold sur­vey. That con­tin­ues a multi-​year trend — while there were 2,512,000 non-​farm jobs added on a not-​seasonally-​adjusted basis since August 2013, there were only 2,064,000 more peo­ple employed in non-​farm jobs on a not-​seasonally-​adjusted.

Stay­ing with the non-​seasonally-​adjusted num­bers, the 63.0% labor-​force par­tic­i­pa­tion rate is the weak­est August since August 1977’s 62.7%. The 59.1% employment-​population ratio is, other than August 1982’s 58.7%, the weak­est August between August 1977’s 59.0% and August 2010’s 58.8%. In fact, a larger per­cent­age of the pop­u­la­tion was employed in August 1969 (59.2%) than was employed last month.

One more item — had each 5-​year age group par­tic­i­pated in the labor force at the same per­cent­age as that group did in August 2008 (with the youth par­tic­i­pat­ing even more to cover the fact that the employed por­tion of the 6064, 6569 and 75+ year old pop­u­la­tion is larger than the entire pop­u­la­tion of those age groups back in 2008), the unem­ploy­ment rate would have been 8.8%, not 6.1%.

Revisions/​extensions — Related to this, the Los Ange­les Times has a story on the boom­ing street ven­dor phe­nom­e­non that has grown well beyond its tra­di­tional recent immi­grant base to include, among oth­ers, laid-​off pro­fes­sion­als. While the Times has a short mem­ory and didn’t make the con­nec­tion, those with a sense of his­tory might note the sim­i­lar­i­ties to the last “Great” eco­nomic down­turn, the Great Depression.

By Steve Eggleston

Yesterday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the August jobs report, and the news was not good. The seasonally-adjusted 144,000 non-farm jobs added, with 134,000 in the private sector, broke the 8-month streak of at least 200,000 jobs added per month, and was unexpectedly worse than the expert consensus of 220,000-230,000 jobs added. The prior two months’ worth of jobs gains were revised down by a net 28,000.

Meanwhile, even though the unemployment rate fell by 0.1 percentage points to 6.1%, that was due almost exclusively to more people departing the workforce. Only 16,000 more people were employed on a seasonally-adjusted basis in August, while the labor force declined by 64,000. That drove the seasonally-adjusted labor force participation rate back down to its multi-generational low of 62.8%, a level that, prior to October 2013 (and again in December 2013, April 2014, May 2014 and June 2014), was last seen in March 1978. The seasonally-adjusted employment-population ratio remained stuck at 59.0% for the third consecutive month, a level not seen between February 1984 and August 2009.

As usual, the deeper one digs into the numbers, the worse the news gets. Once again, there is a disconnect between the estabilshment survey, from which the jobs numbers come and the household survey, from which the unemployment numbers come. On a seasonally-adjusted basis, while there were 354,000 non-farm jobs added since June per the establishment survey, there were 168,000 fewer people working in non-farm jobs in August than in June per the household survey. That continues a multi-year trend – while there were 2,512,000 non-farm jobs added on a not-seasonally-adjusted basis since August 2013, there were only 2,064,000 more people employed in non-farm jobs on a not-seasonally-adjusted.

Staying with the non-seasonally-adjusted numbers, the 63.0% labor-force participation rate is the weakest August since August 1977’s 62.7%. The 59.1% employment-population ratio is, other than August 1982’s 58.7%, the weakest August between August 1977’s 59.0% and August 2010’s 58.8%. In fact, a larger percentage of the population was employed in August 1969 (59.2%) than was employed last month.

One more item – had each 5-year age group participated in the labor force at the same percentage as that group did in August 2008 (with the youth participating even more to cover the fact that the employed portion of the 60-64, 65-69 and 75+ year old population is larger than the entire population of those age groups back in 2008), the unemployment rate would have been 8.8%, not 6.1%.

Revisions/extensions – Related to this, the Los Angeles Times has a story on the booming street vendor phenomenon that has grown well beyond its traditional recent immigrant base to include, among others, laid-off professionals. While the Times has a short memory and didn’t make the connection, those with a sense of history might note the similarities to the last “Great” economic downturn, the Great Depression.