The Mis-Education of the American Christian Negro

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The Mis-Education of the American Christian Negro

With apolo­gies to Carter G. Wood­son. This essay was orig­i­nally posted as a Face­book note on June 24, 2010. SinceBaldilocks mini it’s get­ting some recent atten­tion over there, I fig­ured that it could use some atten­tion here.

by baldilocks

Read­ing as a pair of acquain­tances had a back-​and-​forth about Amer­i­can and Russ­ian lit­er­a­ture got me to think­ing about how we Amer­i­cans — espe­cially those of us who attended urban inner-​city pub­lic schools – have been short-​changed with respect to our for­mal pri­mary and sec­ondary edu­ca­tion. From that train of thought, I began to muse on how many of us black Protes­tant Chris­tians have been cheated in the same manner.

When God the Father drew me to Jesus Christ and indi­cated to me that the lat­ter had died for all of my sins and for those of all mankind, it was the end result of read­ing the Liv­ing Bible cover-​to-​cover. And , in turn, it was a begin­ning: the start of a learn­ing process.

Some peo­ple remem­ber the day on which they were saved, but I do not. There was no light­ning bolt of rev­e­la­tion. All I know is that, after being drawn to read the Bible, I began to believe what it said — what God had done and what he promised. But, of course, I didn’t under­stand every­thing or even most things. How­ever, it seems to me in hind­sight that believ­ing — that hav­ing Faith — was the start­ing point. It’s a point that many never get to because of bad child­hood expe­ri­ences both in church and out of it — expe­ri­ences which are the fruit of igno­rance, usually.

Most of us who are black and Amer­i­can were dragged to church as chil­dren — if not by our par­ents, then by an older female rel­a­tive, usu­ally our grand­mother. And, at best, it was an embar­rass­ing expe­ri­ence. Peo­ple would be scream­ing, sweat­ing and pass­ing out. And when you asked your grand­mother or your great-​aunt what their prob­lem was, she’d say that they were hav­ing a “Holy Ghost expe­ri­ence.” (Well, my great-​aunt [2014: RIP] would say that; some of my friends’ older female rel­a­tives were less patient with ques­tions from children.)

I never stopped to ask my great-​aunt what the scrip­tural basis was for hav­ing a “Holy Ghost” expe­ri­ence or whether that basis actu­ally existed (it does), obvi­ously because I didn’t know enough to ask such a ques­tion. All I knew is that I couldn’t wait to get away from those crazy people.

Now I won­der whether the pas­tor of that church or any oth­ers of that day — or even this day — knew what a “Holy Ghost expe­ri­ence” really was or what it sig­ni­fied. Did they know what the pre­cepts and prin­ci­ples were which under­girded their faith? Maybe. Maybe not. But if they did, they cer­tainly weren’t impart­ing that knowl­edge to their flocks. Some may have tried and been told “hey, Preacher, if we want some of that book learn­ing, we’ll go to school.” All I know is that, for me per­son­ally, the scream­ing, hol­ler­ing and falling out was off-​putting. And let’s not even get started about the singing.

Many years later, after my grad­ual con­ver­sion, I went look­ing for a place to reg­u­larly attend church ser­vices, found the same types of envi­ron­ments, and found myself feel­ing the same way as I did when I was a child. But I kept plug­ging for­ward and try­ing to stay with it. One church– lead by a nationally-​known “bishop” here in LA — fea­tured on aver­age one hour and ten min­utes of floor-showing…er, praise and wor­ship and about fif­teen min­utes of hollering…er, ser­mon on aver­age. (Yes, I timed them.) After about five or six vis­its, I began to loath the place. My spir­i­tual side asked, “what part of this is for our souls?” My car­nal side asked, “why am I get­ting up on Sun­day morn­ings, putting on a dress, panty-​hose and make-​up for this?”

Finally, I prayed about it and decided to stay home and make more deci­sions. From the day of that prayer, I was lead to a local pas­tor who turned out to be steeped in bib­li­cal his­tory. In addi­tion, one par­tic­u­lar part of the pastor’s knowl­edge base pulled me in and that leads me to ask a rhetor­i­cal ques­tion: before the last decade or so, how many aver­age, every­day Amer­i­can Protes­tant pas­tors men­tioned, even in pass­ing, that the Bible was orig­i­nally writ­ten in three sep­a­rate lan­guages, none of them being English?

Not only did this pas­tor men­tion it, he was flu­ent in them — Ancient Hebrew and Ara­maic for the Old Tes­ta­ment and Com­mon (Koine) Greek for the New — along with sev­eral oth­ers. Hav­ing been a Ger­man and Russ­ian lin­guist in the Air Force, I felt like an idiot for never actively think­ing about this before. How­ever, the rea­son this pastor’s abil­i­ties piqued my inter­est is obvious.

I’ve been attend­ing this par­tic­u­lar church for six years now [2014: now ten] and, while the orig­i­nal pas­tor has moved on to his reward, the new pas­tor has car­ried on in the same vein. Word stud­ies, trans­la­tion cor­rec­tions and con­cep­tual cor­rec­tions, debunk­ing the need for mod­ern, unbib­li­cal tra­di­tions like pub­lic tes­ti­monies and altar calls, illu­mi­nat­ing the con­cept of what Paul said about women in the pul­pit — they’re all a part of the ser­vices of this church. There I have relearned what I found out while learn­ing for­eign lan­guages on my own — that some­times ideas get lost in the trans­la­tion and, in this case, ideas that can make or break one’s Faith.

In addi­tion, the his­tory of the Church, its strug­gles and its foun­da­tion in Judaism sit at the fore­front of the ser­mons. It’s more like being a stu­dent of the church — a stu­dent of Faith in God.

The fol­low­ing is a cur­sory list of some per­son­al­i­ties, top­ics and source mate­ri­als that the two pas­tors have used and dis­cussed. It cer­tainly is only the beginning:

  • Proto Indo-​European lan­guage patterns
  • Pen­ta­teuch (aka the first five books of the Torah/​Old Testament)
  • The Taber­na­cle
  • Jew­ish Feasts
  • Day of the Pentecost
  • Ori­gen Adamantius
  • Sep­tu­agint (trans­la­tion of the Torah from Hebrew to Greek; 2nd-​3rd Cen­turies B.C.)
  • Nicene Creed (4th cen­tury A.D.)
  • Augus­tine (354430)i
  • Pelag­ius (ca. AD 354 – ca. AD 420440)
  • St. Jerome (4th-​5th cen­turies A.D) and the Latin Vulgate
  • Cru­sades
  • Thomas Aquinas (12251274)
  • John Wycliffe (c.13241384)
  • About how the pub­li­ca­tion of the Guten­berg Bible changed the path of Chris­tian­ity (1450s).
  • The impor­tance of the Protes­tant Ref­or­ma­tion and, thereby, about Mar­tin Luther (14831546)
  • and his Ninety-​five Theses.
  • William Tyn­dale (14941563).
  • John Calvin (15091564)
  • Coun­cil of Trent (15451563)
  • About John Locke, Nat­ural Law and how the idea of such is reflected in the Amer­i­can Dec­la­ra­tion of Inde­pen­dence and the Bill of Rights of the U.S. Con­sti­tu­tion. (1600s)
  • Walton’s Poly­glot
  • John Wes­ley (17031781)
  • E.M. Bounds (18351913)
  • G.K. Chester­ton (18741936)
  • My beloved C.S. Lewis (18981963), who went from hard­core athe­ist to ardent Chris­t­ian believer and one of its most con­vinc­ing apologists.
  • Rein­hold Niebuhr (18921971)
  • Har­vey Cox

And, of course, how all of these peo­ple, these coun­cils, these con­cepts and these doc­u­ments relate to the Word of God as orig­i­nally handed down by him to his prophets and recorded by the them and how these relate to our being saved through faith in Jesus Christ.

Yes, I learned all of these top­ics in church. Do you think that this is a lot for Sun­day church ser­vices?ii Well, appar­ently, many Chris­t­ian min­is­ters do as well and are con­tent to feed their flocks the reli­gious and intel­lec­tual equiv­a­lent of candy. No won­der so many who still say they are Chris­tians and who really do believe in the sav­ing power of Jesus Christ aren’t will­ing to get up on Sun­day morn­ings and go to church. Why should they for a lit­tle singing, a lit­tle danc­ing and lit­tle hollering?

My point: it seems that, while Amer­i­can sec­u­lar edu­ca­tion has been dumbed-​down for the masses, it is cer­tain that the same has hap­pened to reli­gious edu­ca­tion. I, for one, hadn’t even known that the Jew­ish Torah and the Old Tes­ta­ment were one and the same.

We as adults spend time and money mas­ter­ing the con­cepts and use of the tools needed in order to make a liv­ing. Why is it that too many of us Chris­tians can’t be both­ered or don’t know enough to be both­ered to learn about the his­tory — good and bad – of our faith? If we say that we are Chris­tians and we believe in an after­life,iii then our faith is of the utmost importance.

Remem­ber what eter­nity means? It means ‘never end­ing.’ When we learn about our faith, we are gain­ing knowl­edge about our for­ever. And while there’s noth­ing wrong with get­ting emo­tional about one faith, Chris­tian­ity is not emo­tional at all and is, in fact, very log­i­cal. But don’t take my word for it; check it out for yourself.

My pas­tor asserts that a per­son need not leave his/​her brain at the door when pass­ing through the thresh­old of the church entrance. Well, thank God for that.

_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​_​

i The great thing about doing what God wants you to do is that some­times he has pro­vided the tools for you to do it before you even ask. Twenty-​five years ago, when I was a young USAF NCO/​student at the Defense Lan­guage Insti­tute learn­ing the Ger­man lan­guage, an ency­clo­pe­dia sales­man was allowed to mar­ket to the troops and I bought his wares. These included: the ency­clo­pe­dia set, a huge three-​volume dic­tio­nary (whose print has become smaller, strangely enough), a humon­gous Bible and the crown jewel…a fifty-​four vol­ume set of the Great Thinkers, to include the works of St. Augus­tine and Thomas Aquinas!

ii About half of the names, etc. came off the top of my head from what I remem­ber from ser­mons at my church. The rest came from a review of notes taken dur­ing the ser­mons just from the past two years.

iii A very per­cep­tive Chris­t­ian pointed out to me that the after­life is this life — just not in this type of body. It’s rem­i­nis­cent of a C.S. Lewis quote: “You don’t have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.”

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2009; the sec­ond edi­tion in 2012. Her new novel, Arlen’s Harem, is due in 2014. Help her fund it and help keep her blog alive!

With apologies to Carter G. Woodson. This essay was originally posted as a Facebook note on June 24, 2010. SinceBaldilocks mini it’s getting some recent attention over there, I figured that it could use some attention here.

by baldilocks

Reading as a pair of acquaintances had a back-and-forth about American and Russian literature got me to thinking about how we Americans—especially those of us who attended urban inner-city public schools–have been short-changed with respect to our formal primary and secondary education. From that train of thought, I began to muse on how many of us black Protestant Christians have been cheated in the same manner.

When God the Father drew me to Jesus Christ and indicated to me that the latter had died for all of my sins and for those of all mankind, it was the end result of reading the Living Bible cover-to-cover. And , in turn, it was a beginning: the start of a learning process.

Some people remember the day on which they were saved, but I do not. There was no lightning bolt of revelation. All I know is that, after being drawn to read the Bible, I began to believe what it said—what God had done and what he promised. But, of course, I didn’t understand everything or even most things. However, it seems to me in hindsight that believing—that having Faith—was the starting point. It’s a point that many never get to because of bad childhood experiences both in church and out of it—experiences which are the fruit of ignorance, usually.

Most of us who are black and American were dragged to church as children—if not by our parents, then by an older female relative, usually our grandmother. And, at best, it was an embarrassing experience. People would be screaming, sweating and passing out. And when you asked your grandmother or your great-aunt what their problem was, she’d say that they were having a “Holy Ghost experience.” (Well, my great-aunt [2014: RIP] would say that; some of my friends’ older female relatives were less patient with questions from children.)

I never stopped to ask my great-aunt what the scriptural basis was for having a “Holy Ghost” experience or whether that basis actually existed (it does), obviously because I didn’t know enough to ask such a question. All I knew is that I couldn’t wait to get away from those crazy people.

Now I wonder whether the pastor of that church or any others of that day—or even this day—knew what a “Holy Ghost experience” really was or what it signified. Did they know what the precepts and principles were which undergirded their faith? Maybe. Maybe not. But if they did, they certainly weren’t imparting that knowledge to their flocks. Some may have tried and been told “hey, Preacher, if we want some of that book learning, we’ll go to school.” All I know is that, for me personally, the screaming, hollering and falling out was off-putting. And let’s not even get started about the singing.

Many years later, after my gradual conversion, I went looking for a place to regularly attend church services, found the same types of environments, and found myself feeling the same way as I did when I was a child. But I kept plugging forward and trying to stay with it. One church– lead by a nationally-known “bishop” here in LA—featured on average one hour and ten minutes of floor-showing…er, praise and worship and about fifteen minutes of hollering…er, sermon on average. (Yes, I timed them.) After about five or six visits, I began to loath the place. My spiritual side asked, “what part of this is for our souls?” My carnal side asked, “why am I getting up on Sunday mornings, putting on a dress, panty-hose and make-up for this?”

Finally, I prayed about it and decided to stay home and make more decisions. From the day of that prayer, I was lead to a local pastor who turned out to be steeped in biblical history. In addition, one particular part of the pastor’s knowledge base pulled me in and that leads me to ask a rhetorical question: before the last decade or so, how many average, everyday American Protestant pastors mentioned, even in passing, that the Bible was originally written in three separate languages, none of them being English?

Not only did this pastor mention it, he was fluent in them—Ancient Hebrew and Aramaic for the Old Testament and Common (Koine) Greek for the New—along with several others. Having been a German and Russian linguist in the Air Force, I felt like an idiot for never actively thinking about this before. However, the reason this pastor’s abilities piqued my interest is obvious.

I’ve been attending this particular church for six years now [2014: now ten] and, while the original pastor has moved on to his reward, the new pastor has carried on in the same vein. Word studies, translation corrections and conceptual corrections, debunking the need for modern, unbiblical traditions like public testimonies and altar calls, illuminating the concept of what Paul said about women in the pulpit—they’re all a part of the services of this church. There I have relearned what I found out while learning foreign languages on my own—that sometimes ideas get lost in the translation and, in this case, ideas that can make or break one’s Faith.

In addition, the history of the Church, its struggles and its foundation in Judaism sit at the forefront of the sermons. It’s more like being a student of the church—a student of Faith in God.

The following is a cursory list of some personalities, topics and source materials that the two pastors have used and discussed. It certainly is only the beginning:

  • Proto Indo-European language patterns
  • Pentateuch (aka the first five books of the Torah/Old Testament)
  • The Tabernacle
  • Jewish Feasts
  • Day of the Pentecost
  • Origen Adamantius
  • Septuagint (translation of the Torah from Hebrew to Greek; 2nd-3rd Centuries B.C.)
  • Nicene Creed (4th century A.D.)
  • Augustine (354- 430)i
  • Pelagius (ca. AD 354 – ca. AD 420/440)
  • St. Jerome (4th-5th centuries A.D) and the Latin Vulgate
  • Crusades
  • Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)
  • John Wycliffe (c.1324-1384)
  • About how the publication of the Gutenberg Bible changed the path of Christianity (1450s).
  • The importance of the Protestant Reformation and, thereby, about Martin Luther (1483-1546)
  • and his Ninety-five Theses.
  • William Tyndale (1494-1563).
  • John Calvin (1509-1564)
  • Council of Trent (1545-1563)
  • About John Locke, Natural Law and how the idea of such is reflected in the American Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights of the U.S. Constitution. (1600s)
  • Walton’s Polyglot
  • John Wesley (1703-1781)
  • E.M. Bounds (1835-1913)
  • G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936)
  • My beloved C.S. Lewis (1898-1963), who went from hardcore atheist to ardent Christian believer and one of its most convincing apologists.
  • Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971)
  • Harvey Cox

And, of course, how all of these people, these councils, these concepts and these documents relate to the Word of God as originally handed down by him to his prophets and recorded by the them and how these relate to our being saved through faith in Jesus Christ.

Yes, I learned all of these topics in church. Do you think that this is a lot for Sunday church services?ii Well, apparently, many Christian ministers do as well and are content to feed their flocks the religious and intellectual equivalent of candy. No wonder so many who still say they are Christians and who really do believe in the saving power of Jesus Christ aren’t willing to get up on Sunday mornings and go to church. Why should they for a little singing, a little dancing and little hollering?

My point: it seems that, while American secular education has been dumbed-down for the masses, it is certain that the same has happened to religious education. I, for one, hadn’t even known that the Jewish Torah and the Old Testament were one and the same.

We as adults spend time and money mastering the concepts and use of the tools needed in order to make a living. Why is it that too many of us Christians can’t be bothered or don’t know enough to be bothered to learn about the history—good and bad–of our faith? If we say that we are Christians and we believe in an afterlife,iii then our faith is of the utmost importance.

Remember what eternity means? It means ‘never ending.’ When we learn about our faith, we are gaining knowledge about our forever. And while there’s nothing wrong with getting emotional about one faith, Christianity is not emotional at all and is, in fact, very logical. But don’t take my word for it; check it out for yourself.

My pastor asserts that a person need not leave his/her brain at the door when passing through the threshold of the church entrance. Well, thank God for that.

________________________________________

i The great thing about doing what God wants you to do is that sometimes he has provided the tools for you to do it before you even ask. Twenty-five years ago, when I was a young USAF NCO/student at the Defense Language Institute learning the German language, an encyclopedia salesman was allowed to market to the troops and I bought his wares. These included: the encyclopedia set, a huge three-volume dictionary (whose print has become smaller, strangely enough), a humongous Bible and the crown jewel…a fifty-four volume set of the Great Thinkers, to include the works of St. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas!

ii About half of the names, etc. came off the top of my head from what I remember from sermons at my church. The rest came from a review of notes taken during the sermons just from the past two years.

iii A very perceptive Christian pointed out to me that the afterlife is this life—just not in this type of body. It’s reminiscent of a C.S. Lewis quote: “You don’t have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.”

 Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her new novel, Arlen’s Harem, is due in 2014. Help her fund it and help keep her blog alive!