Readability

Pieces of the Dream

by baldilocksbaldilocks

I’m guilty of many things, but one is talk­ing about race and Things Black too much.

The rep­u­ta­tional demise of pub­lic astro­physi­cist Neil Degrasse Tyson elicited a great deal of Schaden­freude, but it depressed me for one rea­son: I liked see­ing a black per­son talk about some­thing other than race, being black, or crime – the last of which is all too often a byprod­uct of race. Find­ing out that Mr. Tyson is a bit of a char­la­tan made me sad.

That said, in this post, I will be again guilty of dis­cussing race, but only to point to three pock­ets of hope on the subject.

The mindterm elec­tion this past week saw the turn­ing of the U.S. Sen­ate to the GOP and GOP gains for the House. Among these are Sen­a­tor Tim Scott (SC), Representative-​Elects Mia Love (UT-​4), and the much-​less her­alded, but no less sig­nif­i­cant Will Hurd (TX-​23). That these three peo­ple are black and Repub­li­can is remark­able in itself, but some might also find it equally remark­able that the major­ity of each con­stituency is non-​black. (Mr. Hurd’s dis­trict con­sists of mostly of Amer­i­cans of Mex­i­can ances­try.) How­ever, this shouldn’t be sur­pris­ing at all.

Most (all?) U.S. con­gres­sional dis­tricts rep­re­sented by black Democ­rats – Con­gres­sional Black Cau­cus mem­bers – have long been carved out for them. I con­tend that each one of them has been planted by the Demo­c­rat Party and the party heav­ily funds all of their campaigns.

It is a method of keep­ing each of these dis­tricts vot­ing Demo­c­ra­tic, keep­ing the vot­ers quiet about eco­nomic progress, and it feeds on the indoc­tri­nated notion that hav­ing a rep­re­sen­ta­tive who looks like you some­how ele­vates you. That same notion explains why vir­tu­ally all black Amer­i­can vot­ers voted for Barack Obama, espe­cially in 2012. And I need to repeat: it keeps each of these dis­tricts vot­ing Demo­c­ra­tic. This is how the fal­lacy of black=Democrat was born.

An inverse anec­do­tal exam­ple: I live in a dis­trict with a majority-​black vot­ing base – for­merly rep­re­sented by Max­ine Waters and recently re-​carved in order for Karen Bass to retain her place at the table – and have watched, cycle after cycle, as Repub­li­cans – usu­ally black, but not always – have hap­lessly run, includ­ing the locally famous home­less activist Ted Hayes in 2008. These brave peo­ple get no pub­lic­ity and, usu­ally, lit­tle fund­ing, though Mr. Hayes got a great deal of the latter.

Also related: the National Asso­ci­a­tion for the Advance­ment of Com­mu­nist Prin­ci­ples (NAACP) ignored the elec­tions of Scott, Love and Hurd while nat­ter­ing on about vot­ing rights in its Novem­ber 4 elec­tion state­ment. This omis­sion is the very embod­i­ment of the afore­men­tioned indoc­tri­na­tion. Take a bow, LBJ!

Back to the newly elected black Repub­li­cans, the demo­graph­ics of these pock­ets of post-​racialism is the real progress: that three peo­ple who do not look like the major­ity of their con­stituents can be elected by them and that three black politi­cians can base their cam­paigns on issues other than race.

And, please, save it about the elec­tion of Barack Obama. We all know that his elec­tion and his sub­se­quent two terms have not rep­re­sented the onset of post-​racialism. Remem­ber, being black equals being a Demo­c­rat, accord­ing to the brainwashing.

How­ever, I think that the ascent of these three leg­is­la­tors will make a dif­fer­ence. Maybe.

After all, wasn’t that what the Civil Rights Move­ment was really about, con­flat­ing pub­lic and pri­vate prop­erty notwithstanding?

(Thanks to Instapun­dit and to Twitchy)

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2009; the sec­ond edi­tion in 2012. Her sec­ond novel, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2015.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or con­tribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism — -»»

by baldilocksbaldilocks

I’m guilty of many things, but one is talking about race and Things Black too much.

The reputational demise of public astrophysicist Neil Degrasse Tyson elicited a great deal of Schadenfreude, but it depressed me for one reason: I liked seeing a black person talk about something other than race, being black, or crime–the last of which is all too often a byproduct of race. Finding out that Mr. Tyson is a bit of a charlatan made me sad.

That said, in this post, I will be again guilty of discussing race, but only to point to three pockets of hope on the subject.

The mindterm election this past week saw the turning of the U.S. Senate to the GOP and GOP gains for the House. Among these are Senator Tim Scott (SC), Representative-Elects Mia Love (UT-4), and the much-less heralded, but no less significant Will Hurd (TX-23). That these three people are black and Republican is remarkable in itself, but some might also find it equally remarkable that the majority of each constituency is non-black. (Mr. Hurd’s district consists of mostly of Americans of Mexican ancestry.) However, this shouldn’t be surprising at all.

Most (all?) U.S. congressional districts represented by black Democrats–Congressional Black Caucus members–have long been carved out for them. I contend that each one of them has been planted by the Democrat Party and the party heavily funds all of their campaigns.

It is a method of keeping each of these districts voting Democratic, keeping the voters quiet about economic progress, and it feeds on the indoctrinated notion that having a representative who looks like you somehow elevates you. That same notion explains why virtually all black American voters voted for Barack Obama, especially in 2012. And I need to repeat: it keeps each of these districts voting Democratic. This is how the fallacy of black=Democrat was born.

An inverse anecdotal example: I live in a district with a majority-black voting base–formerly represented by Maxine Waters and recently re-carved in order for Karen Bass to retain her place at the table–and have watched, cycle after cycle, as Republicans–usually black, but not always–have haplessly run, including the locally famous homeless activist Ted Hayes in 2008. These brave people get no publicity and, usually, little funding, though Mr. Hayes got a great deal of the latter.

Also related: the National Association for the Advancement of Communist Principles (NAACP) ignored the elections of Scott, Love and Hurd while nattering on about voting rights in its November 4 election statement. This omission is the very embodiment of the aforementioned indoctrination. Take a bow, LBJ!

Back to the newly elected black Republicans, the demographics of these pockets of post-racialism is the real progress: that three people who do not look like the majority of their constituents can be elected by them and that three black politicians can base their campaigns on issues other than race.

And, please, save it about the election of Barack Obama. We all know that his election and his subsequent two terms have not represented the onset of post-racialism. Remember, being black equals being a Democrat, according to the brainwashing.

However, I think that the ascent of these three legislators will make a difference. Maybe.

After all, wasn’t that what the Civil Rights Movement was really about, conflating public and private property notwithstanding?

(Thanks to Instapundit and to Twitchy)

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2009; the second edition in 2012. Her second novel, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2015.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects: Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or contribute to Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>