The only people with the right to object to immigration are Native Americans

Ladies and gentlemen, the President of the United States:

“If you look at the history of immigration in this country, each successive wave there have been periods where the folks who were already here have said, ‘Well I don’t want those folks,'” he said. “Even though the only people who have the right to say that are some Native Americans.”

Video here (around 10:05)

Let’s look at this:

The only people who have the right to say that
The Constitution says (emphasis added),

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Indeed, all Americans have the inalienable right to free speech.

inalienable

adjective
1.
not alienable; not transferable to another or capable of being repudiated:

are some Native Americans
“Some”?

And who would be the one determining which Native Americans have the right to?

This is the kind of rhetoric we get from a president whose idea of governing is to bypass Congress.

And I use the word rhetoric advisedly,

(in classical oratory) the art of influencing the thought and conduct of an audience.

While the speech could not be thought of as classical oratory, you could say that the statement “Even though the only people who have the right to say that are some Native Americans,” qualifies as a classic.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics at Fausta’s Blog.