Two questions concerning the 2014 Occidental “Let’s Elect Democrats” program

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Two questions concerning the 2014 Occidental "Let's Elect Democrats" program

After see­ing this arti­cle con­cern­ing Occi­den­tal College’s involve­ment in the polit­i­cal process for school credit

The results were the first for Occidental’s bian­nual pro­gram, in which stu­dents spend the begin­ning of a semes­ter work­ing in the field and then return to cam­pus, study­ing cam­paign tac­tics and polit­i­cal the­ory, dis­cussing their expe­ri­ences and the results of the election.

In addi­tion to talk­ing about the finer points of voter engage­ment and cam­paign dona­tions, the stu­dents also talk about the more unsa­vory aspects of democ­racy: neg­a­tive ads, doors slammed in your face and what it’s like to live on pizza for weeks at a time. And, for this group, what it’s like to feel depressed and cry after your can­di­date loses.

Which included this line:

All of the stu­dents worked for Demo­c­ra­tic candidates;

and this one:

The two pro­fes­sors teach­ing the course — Peter Dreier and Regina Freer — were con­cerned enough that they asked the reli­gious coun­selor to visit the class.

My ques­tions are these:

1. If a col­lege is giv­ing full time credit for work­ing for these cam­paigns is this not an “in-​kind” dona­tion to the can­di­dates and par­ties by the school that much be reported as such?

2. How is this col­lege prepar­ing folks for the real world when you have peo­ple who are so freaked out by los­ing a cam­paign that you have to sum­mon “reli­gious coun­selor” visit the class after an elec­toral defeat?

I’m glad nether of my kids went there.

After seeing this article concerning Occidental College’s involvement in the political process for school credit

The results were the first for Occidental’s biannual program, in which students spend the beginning of a semester working in the field and then return to campus, studying campaign tactics and political theory, discussing their experiences and the results of the election.

In addition to talking about the finer points of voter engagement and campaign donations, the students also talk about the more unsavory aspects of democracy: negative ads, doors slammed in your face and what it’s like to live on pizza for weeks at a time. And, for this group, what it’s like to feel depressed and cry after your candidate loses.

Which included this line:

All of the students worked for Democratic candidates;

and this one:

The two professors teaching the course — Peter Dreier and Regina Freer — were concerned enough that they asked the religious counselor to visit the class.

 

My questions are these:

1.  If a college is giving full time credit for working for these campaigns is this not an “in-kind” donation to the candidates and parties by the school that much be reported as such?

2.  How is this college preparing folks for the real world when you have people who are so freaked out by losing a campaign that you have to summon “religious counselor” visit the class after an electoral defeat?

I’m glad nether of my kids went there.