Last-minute shopping: The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels

Readability

Last-minute shopping: The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels

It’s Christ­mas eve, you hate, hate, going to the mall, and you have read­ers on your list who don’t like fic­tion. I strongly rec­om­mend you buy them The Moral Case for Fos­sil Fuels on Kin­dle edi­tion, which they can also read on line and in their tablets and cell phone apps.

Epstein cre­ated the Cen­ter for Indus­trial Progress (empha­sis added),

Cen­ter for Indus­trial Progress (CIP) is a for-​profit think-​tank seek­ing to bring about a new indus­trial rev­o­lu­tion. We believe that human beings have the untapped poten­tial to rad­i­cally improve our lives by using tech­nol­ogy to improve the planet across a mul­ti­tude of indus­tries: min­ing, man­u­fac­tur­ing, agri­cul­ture, chem­istry, and energy. Every indi­vid­ual has the poten­tial for a longer, hap­pier, health­ier, safer, more com­fort­able, more mean­ing­ful, more opportunity-​filled life.

The keys to a new indus­trial rev­o­lu­tion are a new indus­trial phi­los­o­phy, a new indus­trial pol­icy, and a new approach to communication.

The empha­sis on using tech­nol­ogy for an anti-​pollution but pro-​development approach to improve our lives is key to The Moral Case for Fos­sil Fuels.

Epstein con­vinc­ingly makes the case that “fos­sil fuel power [is] cheap, plen­ti­ful, reli­able, scaleable — indis­pens­able.” He dis­cusses the green­house effect and the fer­til­izer effect (and global green­ing), the energy effect, and cli­mate mastery.

Cli­mate mas­tery, you ask? Yes,

There are two ele­ments to mas­ter­ing cli­mate. One is con­trol over the cli­mate you’re in. Two is the abil­ity to make the most of the cli­mate you’re in. [page 122]

Epstein goes on to dis­cuss how fos­sil fuel energy con­tributes to cli­mate liv­abil­ity and cli­mate justice.

This is only one exam­ple of the top­ics he dis­cusses through­out the book. He makes a con­vinc­ing case that fos­sil fuels are the only way to develop cheap, reli­able, plen­ti­ful energy for seven bil­lion peo­ple, and that it’s immoral to deny it to the devel­op­ing world.

When I was asked if I would review the book I said yes but clar­i­fied that I could not promise you favor­able review. Now that I read it, I highly rec­om­mend it.

And you’re on time for Christmas!

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s Blog.

It’s Christmas eve, you hate, hate, going to the mall, and you have readers on your list who don’t like fiction. I strongly recommend you buy them The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels on Kindle edition, which they can also read on line and in their tablets and cell phone apps.

Epstein created the Center for Industrial Progress (emphasis added),

Center for Industrial Progress (CIP) is a for-profit think-tank seeking to bring about a new industrial revolution. We believe that human beings have the untapped potential to radically improve our lives by using technology to improve the planet across a multitude of industries: mining, manufacturing, agriculture, chemistry, and energy. Every individual has the potential for a longer, happier, healthier, safer, more comfortable, more meaningful, more opportunity-filled life.

The keys to a new industrial revolution are a new industrial philosophy, a new industrial policy, and a new approach to communication.

The emphasis on using technology for an anti-pollution but pro-development approach to improve our lives is key to The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels.

Epstein convincingly makes the case that “fossil fuel power [is] cheap, plentiful, reliable, scaleable – indispensable.” He discusses the greenhouse effect and the fertilizer effect (and global greening), the energy effect, and climate mastery.

Climate mastery, you ask? Yes,

There are two elements to mastering climate. One is control over the climate you’re in. Two is the ability to make the most of the climate you’re in. [page 122]

Epstein goes on to discuss how fossil fuel energy contributes to climate livability and climate justice.

This is only one example of the topics he discusses throughout the book. He makes a convincing case that fossil fuels are the only way to develop cheap, reliable, plentiful energy for seven billion people, and that it’s immoral to deny it to the developing world.

When I was asked if I would review the book I said yes but clarified that I could not promise you favorable review. Now that I read it, I highly recommend it.

And you’re on time for Christmas!

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.