The latest battle in the long leftist war: The anti-police protests

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The latest battle in the long leftist war: The anti-police protests

[cap­tion id=“attachment_60541” align=“alignright” width=“242”]Bill Ayers at at 2012 Occupy Chicago rally Bill Ayers at a 2012
Occupy Chicago rally[/caption]

By John Ruberry

In David Horowitz’ pam­phlet Barack Obama’s Rules for Rev­o­lu­tion, the one­time left­ist remarked, “An SDS rad­i­cal once wrote, ‘the issue is never the issue. The issue is always the rev­o­lu­tion.’ In other words, the cause-​whether inner city blacks or women – is never the real cause, but only an occa­sion to advance the real cause, which is the accu­mu­la­tion of power to make the revolution.”

Now the cause is police killing of blacks, but in real­ity the protests about the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Gar­ner betray the long­time anti-​police sen­ti­ments of the Left since the 1960s. But that is a sub­ject for another blog post. Today I’m going to talk about the issue.

The emer­gence of the New Left, which was kick­started by the afore­men­tioned Stu­dents for a Demo­c­ra­tic Soci­ety, which Bill Ayers was a mem­ber of, was part of the upheaval of the late 1960s. The New Left eschewed the main­stream lib­er­al­ism of Hubert Humphrey and the George Meany-​led labor move­ment and its anti-​communist bent. The Viet­nam War, the Civil Rights move­ment, and Women’s Lib­er­a­tion were the issues then. In the 1970s, the New Left’s call for action were the Water­gate scan­dal and the envi­ron­ment – in the 1980s it was the No Nukes and the Nuclear dis­ar­ma­ment causes, in the ‘90s and the 2000s, the Mid­dle East wars were the issue.

In 2011, the openly left­ist Occupy Wall Street move­ment emerged. Not sur­pris­ingly, it collapsed.

Dur­ing this time span, I’m not sure when, but let’s say it was in 2000, through attri­tion, death mainly, the New Left sup­planted the Old Left. It is they and lib­eral Gen­er­a­tion Xers and Mil­lenials who have fol­lowed them that are the dri­ving force in the con­tem­po­rary Demo­c­ra­tic Party as well as the labor move­ment. Their true views, which I imag­ine they share with at most twenty per­cent of the elec­torate, are masked. But their goal is still the rev­o­lu­tion. Oba­maCare, a private-​public muta­tion that rep­re­sents the worst of both worlds, is noth­ing but a gate­way to what the libs euphemisti­cally call “single-​payer health care,” that is, social­ized medicine.

[cap­tion id=“attachment_54680” align=“alignright” width=“197”]John "Lee" Ruberry John “Lee” Ruberry[/caption]

When twenty per­cent of the econ­omy is under gov­ern­ment con­trol, the rest of it will appear to the Left as low-​hanging fruit.

But for now, the Left is look­ing to bol­ster its ranks by build­ing up anti-​police protests.

Until the next issue that won’t really be the issue comes along.

John Ruberry reg­u­larly blogs at Marathon Pun­dit.

Bill Ayers at at 2012 Occupy Chicago rally
Bill Ayers at a 2012
Occupy Chicago rally

By John Ruberry

In David Horowitz’ pamphlet Barack Obama’s Rules for Revolution, the onetime leftist remarked, “An SDS radical once wrote, ‘the issue is never the issue. The issue is always the revolution.’  In other words, the cause-whether inner city blacks or women–is never the real cause, but only an occasion to advance the real cause, which is the accumulation of power to make the revolution.”

Now the cause is police killing of blacks, but in reality the protests about the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner betray the longtime anti-police sentiments of the Left since the 1960s. But that is a subject for another blog post. Today I’m going to talk about the issue. 

The emergence of the New Left, which was kickstarted by the aforementioned Students for a Democratic Society, which Bill Ayers was a member of,  was part of the upheaval of the late 1960s.  The New Left eschewed the mainstream liberalism of Hubert Humphrey and the George Meany-led labor movement and its anti-communist bent. The Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, and Women’s Liberation were the issues then. In the 1970s, the New Left’s call for action were the Watergate scandal  and the environment–in the 1980s it was the No Nukes and the Nuclear disarmament causes, in the ’90s and the 2000s, the Middle East wars were the issue.

In 2011, the openly leftist Occupy Wall Street movement emerged. Not surprisingly, it collapsed.

During this time span, I’m not sure when, but let’s say it was in 2000, through attrition, death mainly, the New Left supplanted the Old Left. It is they and liberal Generation Xers and Millenials who have followed them that are the driving force in the contemporary Democratic Party as well as the labor movement. Their true views, which I imagine they share with at most twenty percent of the electorate, are masked. But their goal is still the revolution. ObamaCare, a private-public mutation that represents the worst of both worlds, is nothing but a gateway to what the libs euphemistically call “single-payer health care,” that is, socialized medicine.

John "Lee" Ruberry
John “Lee” Ruberry

When twenty percent of the economy is under government control, the rest of it will appear to the Left as low-hanging fruit.

But for now, the Left is looking to bolster its ranks by building up anti-police protests.

Until the next issue that won’t really be the issue comes along.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.