Mexico: What happened to the 43 students?

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Mexico: What happened to the 43 students?

43 stu­dent teach­ers dis­ap­peared four months ago in Iguala, in the Mex­i­can state of Guer­rero. Now Mexico’s Attor­ney Gen­eral Jesus Murillo Karam says there is “legal cer­tainty” they were mur­dered,

As to why they were killed, Tomás Zerón de Lucio, the head of Mexico’s Crim­i­nal Inves­ti­ga­tions Agency, said it was a case of mis­taken iden­tity. In other words, the crim­i­nal group accused of exe­cut­ing the stu­dents thought they belonged to a rival gang, also oper­at­ing around the town of Iguala where the stu­dents were last seen.

So far, one one has been iden­ti­fied, which the head of the Crim­i­nal Inves­ti­ga­tions Agency blames on how the remains were disposed,

The den­tal remains found in what was the mid­dle of the fire show that the tem­per­a­ture reached 1,600 degrees Cel­sius (2,912 degrees Fahren­heit), which dehy­drated, decom­posed, inter­vened and fused the remains. This makes it impos­si­ble to extract DNA sam­ples, even with the most advanced technology,”

Con­sid­er­ing how cre­ma­tion of a dead body is car­ried out at a tem­per­a­ture rang­ing between 1400 to 1800 degrees Fahren­heit in a con­trolled cham­ber that is not sub­ject to humid­ity, wind, and other exte­rior or envi­ron­men­tal fac­tors, this raises more questions.

Indeed, the stu­dents’ par­ents reject the government’s the­ory, and are accus­ing the gov­ern­ment of try­ing to close the investigation.

The case has gen­er­ated a great deal of con­tro­versy, as there are con­tra­dic­tory state­ments from wit­nesses, but lack of defin­i­tive foren­sic evidence.

Mexico’s pres­i­dent, Enrique Peña Nieto declared yesterday,

I’m con­vinced that we should not remain trapped in this instant, this moment in Mexico’s his­tory, of sor­row, of tragedy and pain. We just can’t dwell here,”

which of course is very con­ve­nient for him.

For peo­ple like myself, the Iguala case shows Mex­ico as a failed state when it comes to jus­tice and the rule of law — not a coun­try one wants to main­tain an open bor­der with.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s Blog.

43 student teachers disappeared four months ago in Iguala, in the Mexican state of Guerrero. Now Mexico’s Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam says there is “legal certainty” they were murdered,

As to why they were killed, Tomás Zerón de Lucio, the head of Mexico’s Criminal Investigations Agency, said it was a case of mistaken identity. In other words, the criminal group accused of executing the students thought they belonged to a rival gang, also operating around the town of Iguala where the students were last seen.

So far, one one has been identified, which the head of the Criminal Investigations Agency blames on how the remains were disposed,

“The dental remains found in what was the middle of the fire show that the temperature reached 1,600 degrees Celsius (2,912 degrees Fahrenheit), which dehydrated, decomposed, intervened and fused the remains. This makes it impossible to extract DNA samples, even with the most advanced technology,”

Considering how cremation of a dead body is carried out at a temperature ranging between 1400 to 1800 degrees Fahrenheit in a controlled chamber that is not subject to humidity, wind, and other exterior or environmental factors, this raises more questions.

Indeed, the students’ parents reject the government’s theory, and are accusing the government of trying to close the investigation.

The case has generated a great deal of controversy, as there are contradictory statements from witnesses, but lack of definitive forensic evidence.

Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto declared yesterday,

“I’m convinced that we should not remain trapped in this instant, this moment in Mexico’s history, of sorrow, of tragedy and pain. We just can’t dwell here,”

which of course is very convenient for him.

For people like myself, the Iguala case shows Mexico as a failed state when it comes to justice and the rule of law – not a country one wants to maintain an open border with.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.