Netflix in Cuba, yeah, right

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Netflix in Cuba, yeah, right

Net­flix CEO Reed Hast­ings announced on Monday

We are delighted to finally be able to offer Net­flix to the peo­ple of Cuba, con­nect­ing them with sto­ries they will love from all over the world,” said Net­flix co-​founder and CEO Reed Hast­ings. “Cuba has great film­mak­ers and a robust arts cul­ture and one day we hope to be able to bring their work to our global audi­ence of over 57 mil­lion members.”

Sounds great, doesn’t it?

Now imag­ine if you, gen­tle reader, had to pay 40% of your gross salary for the priv­i­lege. How great does that sound to you?

The aver­age Cuban max­i­mum salary, accord­ing to law, is the equiv­a­lent of US$20. Twenty dol­lars. And, accord­ing to Net­flix, Cubans Will Gain Access to A Broad Range of Orig­i­nal Series, Movies, Doc­u­men­taries, Stand-​up Com­edy Spe­cials and TV Shows Start­ing At $7.99 “as Inter­net access improves and credit and debit cards become more widely available.”

Sounds opti­mistic, doesn’t it?

About five per­cent of res­i­dents have inter­net access, and the aver­age monthly wage was just $20 in 2013. Addi­tion­ally, Cuba’s inter­net infra­struc­ture is grow­ing, but it’s still a lux­ury for many res­i­dents. In Jan­u­ary, the country’s state-​owned tele­com, ETECSA, launched the first pub­lic WiFi facil­ity in San­ti­ago de Cuba, charg­ing $4.50 an hour — and that’s for those who already own WiFi-​capable devices.

In prac­ti­cal terms, for any­one to access Net­flix, they need

  • some­thing to watch it on
  • inter­net connection
  • dis­cre­tionary income
  • (inter­na­tional) pay­ment method that can be billed on a sub­scrip­tion basis

Who, in Cuba, has all four of those require­ments? The rul­ing elite. The aver­age Cuban on the other hand, has this:

Car­los Éire asks,

So, if 98% of Cubans can’t afford Net­flix or gain access to its ser­vices, why is this deal tak­ing place and why are news ser­vices pay­ing so much atten­tion to it, even declar­ing it a “sig­nif­i­cant” move?

Because it “proves” that the “his­toric” thaw in U.S. –Cuba rela­tions is real and that the for­eign pol­icy of the cur­rent occu­pant of the White House is a great success!

Smoke and mir­rors. Illu­sion. This is how the Big Lie becomes The Truth.

Next stop, North Korea?

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings announced on Monday

“We are delighted to finally be able to offer Netflix to the people of Cuba, connecting them with stories they will love from all over the world,” said Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings. “Cuba has great filmmakers and a robust arts culture and one day we hope to be able to bring their work to our global audience of over 57 million members.”

Sounds great, doesn’t it?

Now imagine if you, gentle reader, had to pay 40% of your gross salary for the privilege. How great does that sound to you?

The average Cuban maximum salary, according to law, is the equivalent of US$20. Twenty dollars. And, according to Netflix, Cubans Will Gain Access to A Broad Range of Original Series, Movies, Documentaries, Stand-up Comedy Specials and TV Shows Starting At $7.99 “as Internet access improves and credit and debit cards become more widely available.”

Sounds optimistic, doesn’t it?

About five percent of residents have internet access, and the average monthly wage was just $20 in 2013. Additionally, Cuba’s internet infrastructure is growing, but it’s still a luxury for many residents. In January, the country’s state-owned telecom, ETECSA, launched the first public WiFi facility in Santiago de Cuba, charging $4.50 an hour — and that’s for those who already own WiFi-capable devices.

In practical terms, for anyone to access Netflix, they need

  • something to watch it on
  • internet connection
  • discretionary income
  • (international) payment method that can be billed on a subscription basis

Who, in Cuba, has all four of those requirements? The ruling elite. The average Cuban on the other hand, has this:

Carlos Eire asks,

So, if 98% of Cubans can’t afford Netflix or gain access to its services, why is this deal taking place and why are news services paying so much attention to it, even declaring it a “significant” move?

Because it “proves” that the “historic” thaw in U.S. -Cuba relations is real and that the foreign policy of the current occupant of the White House is a great success!

Smoke and mirrors. Illusion. This is how the Big Lie becomes The Truth.

Next stop, North Korea?