Some interesting News Concerning Egypt vs ISIS

As you might have heard Egypt has decided to hit ISIS over the public murder of a bunch of its Christian citizens in addition to that strike there have been several developments:

On Monday, el-Sissi visited the main Coptic Cathedral of St. Mark in Cairo to offer his condolences on the Egyptians killed in Libya, according to state TV.

Combined with the his previous  visit with the Coptic pope which amazed Egyptian Christians and his blunt pronouncement that Islam must reform itself the government that overthrew the Muslim Brotherhood is taking unprecedented steps to recognize Egypt Christians as full members of the Egyptian community while pushing back against radical Islam.

That apparently hasn’t gone over well with some in the area:

Qatar recalled its ambassador to Egypt Thursday “for consultation” following a row over Cairo’s air strikes on jihadist targets in Libya, Qatari state media said.

A foreign ministry official said Doha was recalling its envoy over a statement made by Egypt’s delegate to the Arab League Tariq Adel, according to the QNA state news agency.

While there are attempts to minimize this Qatar relations are warming  with another key middle east nation

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman held talks in Riyadh Tuesday with Qatar’s emir, in what an analyst sees as part of a regional effort to strengthen ties against the Islamic State (IS) group.

Qatar’s Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani is the latest Gulf leader to visit Riyadh this week, after Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohamed bin Zayed al-Nahyan and Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah, the emir of Kuwait.

He and the Saudi monarch discussed the enhancement of their relations, as well as international developments, the official Saudi Press Agency said.

And it seems to be delighting some interesting folks:

The accession of King Salman in Saudi Arabia has caused glimmers of hope among Muslim Brotherhood exiles in Qatar that the Middle East’s political winds have started to shift in their favour, potentially giving the Islamist group more space to act.

King Salman is more sympathetic to religious conservatives than his predecessor Abdullah and is seen as less hostile to the group, but analysts and diplomats in Riyadh say any adjustment to Saudi policy towards the Brotherhood is likely to be minimal.

If we are seeing an actual divide among Arab nations between Islamists and non Islamists that could be huge for the region.

It will be interesting to see which side our administration decides to take.