Jihad by any other name is still the same

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Jihad by any other name is still the same

What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet

William Shake­speare, Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene II

The bard’s immor­tal words come to mind when one reads about Gitmo alum­nus Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab, (a.k.a. Abu Wael Dihab, a.k.a. Jihad Ahmad Diyab, a.k.a. Abu Ammar, a.k.a. Abu Wail al-​Suri, a.k.a. Abu Wail al-​Falastini, a.k.a. Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Dhiab).

A 2008 Depart­ment of Defense JTF-​GITMO Detainee Assess­ment (h/​t The Tower) shows him as a high value, high risk detainee with affil­i­a­tions to al-​Qaeda, which he served as a recruiter, and who might pro­vide infor­ma­tion on Iran­ian sup­port to al-​Qaeda.

Jihad, who counts doc­u­ment forg­ing among his skills, was a mem­ber of the “Syr­ian Group” of ter­ror­ists who escaped to Afghanistan, and was later sen­tenced to death in absen­tia in Syria. He appar­ently used his forgery skills at the ser­vice of the Global Jihad Sup­port Network.

In short, Jihad lived up to his name.

Born in 1971 in Lebanon of an Argen­tin­ian mother and a Syr­ian father, Jihad was released from Gitmo last Decem­ber 7, and sent to Uruguay, where he is pro­vided free hous­ing, board, and liv­ing expenses at Uruguayan tax­pay­ers’ expense,

They will be able to bring their fam­i­lies here if they want,” Uruguay’s defense min­is­ter, Eleu­terio Fer­nán­dez Huido­bro, told a local news sta­tion. “They will be accom­pa­nied by peo­ple to help them adjust to the lan­guage and other things. They will have to find jobs.”

They will be able to “live in peace, sit in the sta­dium grand­stand and become fans of some soc­cer team,” he added.

Cori Crider, a lawyer at Reprieve, a human-​rights group that was rep­re­sent­ing him, went as far as say­ing that,

Mr. Dhiab once man­aged a restau­rant in Syria and that he pon­dered open­ing a restau­rant in Uruguay.

Once in Uruguay, Jidad under­went a makeover: Old Jihad, new improved Jihad (which vaguely reminds me of Chris­t­ian Bale).

The new improved Jihad headed to Argentina, escorted by Uruguayan jour­nal­ist Nora Fer­nán­dez Espino, who’s cur­rently work­ing with the Fun­dación de Ayuda Human­i­taria (IHH) (which owns the Mavi Mar­mara, one of the Free Gaza flotilla vessels).

No makeover and travel are com­plete with­out a press con­fer­ence, so of course, one was arranged. Jihad declared that he was “ready to fight” for his fel­low Gitmo detainees. Orange is the new black, so he wore orange in sol­i­dar­ity to Gitmo detainees.

Dur­ing his press con­fer­ence with Left­ist media, Jihab claimed he was just a reg­u­lar guy liv­ing with his fam­ily until the Amer­i­cans dragged him out of his home and sent him to Gitmo. While he made these state­ments, the Del­e­gación de Aso­cia­ciones Israeli­tas Argenti­nas, or DAIA (Del­e­ga­tion of Israelite Argen­tin­ian Asso­ci­a­tions) is wor­ried about the pos­si­bil­ity of a new Islamist attack in Argentina, fol­low­ing the theft of a TOW 2 mis­sile and 130 FAL rifles from the armed forces.

Back in Uruguay, Jihad and the other Gitmo alumni released with him are com­plain­ing that “we feel we have left one prison to be put into another.” while they turned down mul­ti­ple job offers and dropped out of Span­ish lan­guage lessons.

They were issued Uruguayan pass­ports and are free to leave the country.

No word from Ms Crider as to whether that restau­rant is still in the works.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s blog.

What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet

William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene II

The bard’s immortal words come to mind when one reads about Gitmo alumnus Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab, (a.k.a. Abu Wael Dihab, a.k.a. Jihad Ahmad Diyab, a.k.a. Abu Ammar, a.k.a. Abu Wail al-Suri, a.k.a. Abu Wail al-Falastini, a.k.a. Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Dhiab).

A 2008 Department of Defense JTF-GITMO Detainee Assessment (h/t The Tower) shows him as a high value, high risk detainee with affiliations to al-Qaeda, which he served as a recruiter, and who might provide information on Iranian support to al-Qaeda.

Jihad, who counts document forging among his skills, was a member of the “Syrian Group” of terrorists who escaped to Afghanistan, and was later sentenced to death in absentia in Syria. He apparently used his forgery skills at the service of the Global Jihad Support Network.

In short, Jihad lived up to his name.

Born in 1971 in Lebanon of an Argentinian mother and a Syrian father, Jihad was released from Gitmo last December 7, and sent to Uruguay, where he is provided free housing, board, and living expenses at Uruguayan taxpayers’ expense,

“They will be able to bring their families here if they want,” Uruguay’s defense minister, Eleuterio Fernández Huidobro, told a local news station. “They will be accompanied by people to help them adjust to the language and other things. They will have to find jobs.”

They will be able to “live in peace, sit in the stadium grandstand and become fans of some soccer team,” he added.

Cori Crider, a lawyer at Reprieve, a human-rights group that was representing him, went as far as saying that,

Mr. Dhiab once managed a restaurant in Syria and that he pondered opening a restaurant in Uruguay.

Once in Uruguay, Jidad underwent a makeover: Old Jihad, new improved Jihad (which vaguely reminds me of Christian Bale).

The new improved Jihad headed to Argentina, escorted by Uruguayan journalist Nora Fernández Espino, who’s currently working with the Fundación de Ayuda Humanitaria (IHH) (which owns the Mavi Marmara, one of the Free Gaza flotilla vessels).

No makeover and travel are complete without a press conference, so of course, one was arranged. Jihad declared that he was “ready to fight” for his fellow Gitmo detainees. Orange is the new black, so he wore orange in solidarity to Gitmo detainees.

During his press conference with Leftist media, Jihab claimed he was just a regular guy living with his family until the Americans dragged him out of his home and sent him to Gitmo. While he made these statements, the Delegación de Asociaciones Israelitas Argentinas, or DAIA (Delegation of Israelite Argentinian Associations) is worried about the possibility of a new Islamist attack in Argentina, following the theft of a TOW 2 missile and 130 FAL rifles from the armed forces.

Back in Uruguay, Jihad and the other Gitmo alumni released with him are complaining that “we feel we have left one prison to be put into another.” while they turned down multiple job offers and dropped out of Spanish language lessons.

They were issued Uruguayan passports and are free to leave the country.

No word from Ms Crider as to whether that restaurant is still in the works.

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s blog.