21st century way: Unhappy with a business? Harass them online

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21st century way: Unhappy with a business? Harass them online

IndianaBy John Ruberry

Twenty years ago if you were unhappy with a busi­ness, let’s say a check out clerk was rude to you or you were served a rot­ten meal, you had some effec­tive ways of get­ting back. Of course these meth­ods still exist. You can never patron­ize that busi­ness again and tell your friends not to do so as well.

Last week a South Bend, Indi­ana tele­vi­sion reporter ven­tured out­side of her city and trav­eled to tiny Walk­er­ton, a place she prob­a­bly never heard of before, where she inter­viewed one of the own­ers of Mem­o­ries Pizza, a fam­ily busi­ness, who told the reporter that because of their Chris­t­ian beliefs they would not cater a gay wed­ding – if they were was asked. The reporter found the “gotcha” story in the sticks that she was seek­ing in regards to Indiana’s new Reli­gious Restora­tion Free­dom Act.

Then the mil­i­tant left went on the attack. The own­ers went into hid­ing after receiv­ing a death threat.

And then the online attacks poured in Actu­ally they’re still com­ing. Mem­o­ries’ Yelp page has been inun­dated with “reviews” from peo­ple who lives almost every­where but north­ern Indi­ana. On the other hand, a high school coach from nearby Goshen took to Twit­ter to sug­gest that Mem­o­ries be burned down. She has since been sus­pended. As I men­tioned in my post here last week, Yelp’s CEO con­demned Indiana’s RFRA, although just last month his firm opened an office in Illi­nois–which has a sim­i­lar law.

Years ago I was at a con­cert where Elvis Costello answered a heck­ler who was shout­ing that he should play “Club­land,” by reply­ing with some­thing blues singer Lit­tle Willie John once said. “I remem­ber the good old days,” Costello quipped, “they’re gone now. ”

True, very true.

But there is some good news. Sup­port­ers of Mem­o­ries Pizza and reli­gious free­dom started a GoFundMe​.com drive for the own­ers of the restau­rant – and it has received $800,000.

The inter­net is a two-​edged sword.

John Ruberry reg­u­larly blogs at Marathon Pun­dit.

IndianaBy John Ruberry

Twenty years ago if you were unhappy with a business, let’s say a check out clerk was rude to you or you were served a rotten meal, you had some effective ways of getting back. Of course these methods still exist. You can never patronize that business again and tell your friends not to do so as well.

Last week a South Bend, Indiana television reporter ventured outside of her city and traveled to tiny Walkerton, a place she probably never heard of before, where she interviewed one of the owners of Memories Pizza, a family business, who told the reporter that because of their Christian beliefs they would not cater a gay wedding–if they were was asked. The reporter found the “gotcha” story in the sticks that she was seeking in regards to Indiana’s new Religious Restoration Freedom Act.

Then the militant left went on the attack. The owners went into hiding after receiving a death threat.

And then the online attacks poured in Actually they’re still coming. Memories’ Yelp page has been inundated with “reviews” from people who lives almost everywhere but northern Indiana. On the other hand, a high school coach from nearby Goshen took to Twitter to suggest that Memories be burned down. She has since been suspended.  As I mentioned in my post here last week, Yelp’s CEO condemned Indiana’s RFRA, although just last month his firm opened an office in Illinois–which has a similar law.

Years ago I was at a concert where Elvis Costello answered a heckler who was shouting that he should play “Clubland,” by replying with something blues singer Little Willie John once said. “I remember the good old days,” Costello quipped, “they’re gone now. ”

True, very true.

But there is some good news. Supporters of Memories Pizza and religious freedom started a GoFundMe.com drive for the owners of the restaurant–and it has received $800,000.

The internet is a two-edged sword.

John Ruberry regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.