Is the entire country suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?…

by Adrienne | October 18th, 2015

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Is the entire country suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?...

it’s entirely pos­si­ble. At least for those of us who are pay­ing attention.

I apol­o­gize for my long absence. I attribute it to PTSD.

The Mayo Clinic describes PTSD as:

Post-​traumatic stress dis­or­der symp­toms may start within three months of a trau­matic event, but some­times symp­toms may not appear until years after the event. These symp­toms cause sig­nif­i­cant prob­lems in social or work sit­u­a­tions and in relationships.

PTSD symp­toms are gen­er­ally grouped into four types: intru­sive mem­o­ries, avoid­ance, neg­a­tive changes in think­ing and mood, or changes in emo­tional reac­tions. source

A trau­matic event doesn’t have to orig­i­nate on the bat­tle­field. I would cat­e­go­rize the re-​election of Obama as a trau­matic event. Re-​read the symp­toms, and tell me they don’t apply to what’s going on in this coun­try. I’m going to stick to national rather than inter­na­tional events so we’re not too overwhelmed.

We are daily bom­barded by bad news and intru­sive gov­ern­ment. The mil­lions of peo­ple who are out of work with no impend­ing prospects for a job are most cer­tainly suf­fer­ing a trau­matic event. House fore­closed? I’d call that pretty trau­matic. How about los­ing your health insur­ance or hav­ing your rates skyrocket?

Peo­ple are becom­ing more reluc­tant to express an opin­ion for fear of the polit­i­cally cor­rect social jus­tice war­riors ruin­ing their lives — both eco­nom­i­cally and socially.

Schools no longer teach chil­dren, but instead try to indoc­tri­nate them into a pro­gres­sive world view. When they’re not com­pli­ant enough, the par­ents are threat­ened and coerced into giv­ing them dan­ger­ous drugs. In every case of the recent mass shoot­ings, the per­pe­tra­tors had been tak­ing psy­chotropic drugs.

The reli­gious free­doms of Chris­tians are being stomped on by a cabal of athe­is­tic pro­gres­sives. Less than a week ago, Obama had this to say:

How do you rec­on­cile the idea of faith being really impor­tant to you and you car­ing a lot about tak­ing faith seri­ously with the fact that, at least in our democ­racy and our civic dis­course, it seems as if folks who take reli­gion the most seri­ously some­times are also those who are sus­pi­cious of those not like them?”

You’ve strug­gled with the fact that here in the United States, some­times Chris­t­ian inter­pre­ta­tion seems to posit an ‘us ver­sus them,’ and those are some­times the loud­est voices.” source

Get it? If you’re a Chris­t­ian and con­cerned about the direc­tion the coun­try is tak­ing, you are now labeled “suspicious.”

Every day, we are lied to by the polit­i­cal class with the help of the MSM. Only the most secluded peo­ple are not aware the econ­omy is in the toi­let. A trip to the gro­cery store can be trau­matic due to infla­tion. I’d call ground beef priced at well over $4.00 per pound traumatic.

Some of us are react­ing to what is going on using avoidance:

  • Try­ing to avoid think­ing or talk­ing about the trau­matic event.
  • Avoid­ing places, activ­i­ties or peo­ple that remind you of the trau­matic event.

Or these other symp­toms from the Mayo clinic:

Neg­a­tive changes in think­ing and mood

Symp­toms of neg­a­tive changes in think­ing and mood may include:

  • Neg­a­tive feel­ings about your­self or other people.
  • Inabil­ity to expe­ri­ence pos­i­tive emotions.
  • Feel­ing emo­tion­ally numb.
  • Lack of inter­est in activ­i­ties you once enjoyed.
  • Hope­less­ness about the future.

Changes in emo­tional reactions

Symp­toms of changes in emo­tional reac­tions (also called arousal symp­toms) may include:

  • Irri­tabil­ity, angry out­bursts or aggres­sive behavior.
  • Always being on guard for danger.
  • Self-​destructive behav­ior, such as drink­ing too much or dri­ving too fast.
  • Trou­ble concentrating.
  • Trou­ble sleeping.

Now that I’ve con­tributed to your PTSD with all this gloom and doom, allow me to make some suggestions.

How to deal with PTSD of this type:

I’m not a doc­tor, and don’t even play one on TV, but I do have cop­ing skills for you to use.

  1. Prayer can change your life. Find some time every day to con­nect with God.
  2. Take care of your­self. Eat a bal­anced diet, go for a walk every day, and get plenty of sleep. If pos­si­ble, take a short nap in the after­noon. Get dressed every­day, even if you’re not going anywhere.
  3. Incor­po­rate rou­tine into your day. Try to go to bed at the same time, and arise at the same time. Have a daily and weekly sched­ule, but don’t worry if unfore­seen events upset your routine.
  4. If you’re job hunt­ing, make a list of all the places you’d like to work, get dressed in your best inter­view clothes, and show up. Ask to speak to the per­son in charge of the depart­ment in which you’d like to work, or the owner of the busi­ness if it is a smaller one. I never, ever got a job by sub­mit­ting an online appli­ca­tion. One time I showed up at a place that required on-​line appli­ca­tions. The man­ager liked me and took me into the back room to fill out the appli­ca­tion on their com­puter, and the next day I started work. Remem­ber, the very worst thing that could hap­pen is they say no. Go to the next place on the list.
  5. If you’re a stay-​at-​home mom (the best kind in my opin­ion), learn how to save money by shop­ping smart. There’s a gazil­lion places on the web to help you.
  6. Find a spe­cial friend to share your wor­ries with. It’s the cheap ver­sion of expen­sive talk ther­apy. Don’t for­get to help them with their wor­ries. Help­ing other peo­ple is very therapeutic.
  7. I’m not a big believer in med­ica­tion for anx­i­ety and stress, and think it should be avoided when pos­si­ble. Try some nat­ural reme­dies. If things are really spi­ral­ing out of con­trol, talk to your doc­tor before going the drug route. In some cases it is a nec­es­sary path to follow.

And lastly, have faith and hope. Not the false “hope” that Obama ped­dled to an unsus­pect­ing pub­lic. Real hope.

Hope is the the­o­log­i­cal virtue by which we desire the king­dom of heaven and eter­nal life as our hap­pi­ness, plac­ing our trust in Christ’s promises and rely­ing not on our own strength, but on the help of the grace of the Holy Spirit.

The virtue of hope responds to the aspi­ra­tion to hap­pi­ness which God has placed in the heart of every man; it takes up the hopes that inspire men’s activ­i­ties and puri­fies them so as to order them to the King­dom of heaven; it keeps man from dis­cour­age­ment; it sus­tains him dur­ing times of aban­don­ment; it opens up his heart in expec­ta­tion of eter­nal beat­i­tude. Buoyed up by hope, he is pre­served from self­ish­ness and led to the hap­pi­ness that flows from charity.

Have a won­der­ful and holy Sunday.

Adri­enne blogs at Adrienne’s Cor­ner com­bin­ing pol­i­tics, reli­gion, food, and cats. Some­times she even makes sense.

it’s entirely possible.  At least for those of us who are paying attention.

I apologize for my long absence.  I attribute it to PTSD.

The Mayo Clinic describes PTSD as:

Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms may start within three months of a traumatic event, but sometimes symptoms may not appear until years after the event. These symptoms cause significant problems in social or work situations and in relationships.

PTSD symptoms are generally grouped into four types: intrusive memories, avoidance, negative changes in thinking and mood, or changes in emotional reactions. source

A traumatic event doesn’t have to originate on the battlefield. I would categorize the re-election of Obama as a traumatic event.  Re-read the symptoms, and tell me they don’t apply to what’s going on in this country.  I’m going to stick to national rather than international events so we’re not too overwhelmed.

We are daily bombarded by bad news and intrusive government.  The millions of people who are out of work with no impending prospects for a job are most certainly suffering a traumatic event.  House foreclosed?  I’d call that pretty traumatic.  How about losing your health insurance or having your rates skyrocket?

People are becoming more reluctant to express an opinion for fear of the politically correct social justice warriors ruining their lives – both economically and socially.

Schools no longer teach children, but instead try to indoctrinate them into a progressive world view.  When they’re not compliant enough, the parents are threatened and coerced into giving them dangerous drugs.  In every case of the recent mass shootings, the perpetrators had been taking psychotropic drugs.

The religious freedoms of Christians are being stomped on by a cabal of atheistic progressives. Less than a week ago, Obama had this to say:

“How do you reconcile the idea of faith being really important to you and you caring a lot about taking faith seriously with the fact that, at least in our democracy and our civic discourse, it seems as if folks who take religion the most seriously sometimes are also those who are suspicious of those not like them?”

“You’ve struggled with the fact that here in the United States, sometimes Christian interpretation seems to posit an ‘us versus them,’ and those are sometimes the loudest voices.” source

Get it?  If you’re a Christian and concerned about the direction the country is taking, you are now labeled “suspicious.”

Every day, we are lied to by the political class with the help of the MSM. Only the most secluded people are not aware the economy is in the toilet.  A trip to the grocery store can be traumatic due to inflation.  I’d call ground beef priced at well over $4.00 per pound traumatic.

Some of us are reacting to what is going on using avoidance:

  • Trying to avoid thinking or talking about the traumatic event.
  • Avoiding places, activities or people that remind you of the traumatic event.

Or these other symptoms from the Mayo clinic:

Negative changes in thinking and mood

Symptoms of negative changes in thinking and mood may include:

  • Negative feelings about yourself or other people.
  • Inability to experience positive emotions.
  • Feeling emotionally numb.
  • Lack of interest in activities you once enjoyed.
  • Hopelessness about the future.

Changes in emotional reactions

Symptoms of changes in emotional reactions (also called arousal symptoms) may include:

  • Irritability, angry outbursts or aggressive behavior.
  • Always being on guard for danger.
  • Self-destructive behavior, such as drinking too much or driving too fast.
  • Trouble concentrating.
  • Trouble sleeping.

Now that I’ve contributed to your PTSD with all this gloom and doom, allow me to make some suggestions.

How to deal with PTSD of this type:

I’m not a doctor, and don’t even play one on TV, but I do have coping skills for you to use.

  1.  Prayer can change your life.  Find some time every day to connect with God.
  2. Take care of yourself.  Eat a balanced diet, go for a walk every day, and get plenty of sleep. If possible, take a short nap in the afternoon.  Get dressed everyday, even if you’re not going anywhere.
  3. Incorporate routine into your day.  Try to go to bed at the same time, and arise at the same time.  Have a daily and weekly schedule, but don’t worry if unforeseen events upset your routine.
  4. If you’re job hunting, make a list of all the places you’d like to work, get dressed in your best interview clothes, and show up.  Ask to speak to the person in charge of the department in which you’d like to work, or the owner of the business if it is a smaller one.  I never, ever got a job by submitting an online application.  One time I showed up at a place that required on-line applications.  The manager liked me and took me into the back room to fill out the application on their computer, and the next day I started work.  Remember, the very worst thing that could happen is they say no.  Go to the next place on the list.
  5. If you’re a stay-at-home mom (the best kind in my opinion), learn how to save money by shopping smart.  There’s a gazillion places on the web to help you.
  6. Find a special friend to share your worries with.  It’s the cheap version of expensive talk therapy.  Don’t forget to help them with their worries.  Helping other people is very therapeutic.
  7. I’m not a big believer in medication for anxiety and stress, and think it should be avoided when possible.  Try some natural remedies.  If things are really spiraling out of control, talk to your doctor before going the drug route.  In some cases it is a necessary path to follow.

And lastly, have faith and hope.  Not the false “hope” that Obama peddled to an unsuspecting public.  Real hope.

Hope is the theological virtue by which we desire the kingdom of heaven and eternal life as our happiness, placing our trust in Christ’s promises and relying not on our own strength, but on the help of the grace of the Holy Spirit.

The virtue of hope responds to the aspiration to happiness which God has placed in the heart of every man; it takes up the hopes that inspire men’s activities and purifies them so as to order them to the Kingdom of heaven; it keeps man from discouragement; it sustains him during times of abandonment; it opens up his heart in expectation of eternal beatitude. Buoyed up by hope, he is preserved from selfishness and led to the happiness that flows from charity.

Have a wonderful and holy Sunday.

Adrienne blogs at Adrienne’s Corner combining politics, religion, food, and cats.  Sometimes she even makes sense.

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