Readability

A Dose of Old-School Education

mathishardby baldilocks

It was dif­fi­cult to believe at first; that there were func­tion­ing adults who didn’t under­stand the dif­fer­ence between raw num­bers and rate.

How­ever, since I found out that chil­dren aren’t taught any­more to do things like write in cur­sive and since I found out that there are young Amer­i­cans who can­not iden­tify the United States on a map, I’ve pretty much fig­ured out that K-​12 schools are, for a sig­nif­i­cant part, just glo­ri­fied day-​care – and from what we’re seen in the last few weeks, that day-​care can last well into higher education.

So you pay the gov­ern­ment to edu­cate your kid and it doesn’t. Then you pay thou­sands to hun­dreds of thou­sands of dol­lars to some college/​university, and all your off­spring learn how to do is to refine their whin­ing skills.

But you come here to Da Tech Guy blog and I’ll give you and your kid some­thing useful.

Here’s your mini-​tutorial on how to cal­cu­late the rate of a group and how to com­pare two sep­a­rate rates.

  • Say you have a pop­u­la­tion of 1100: 1000 Chi­nese and 100 Russians.
  • 200 of the Chi­nese are mur­der­ers and 50 of the Rus­sians are murderers.
  • There­for, in our sam­ple, there are more mur­der­ers who are Chi­nese than there are mur­der­ers who are Rus­sians in raw num­bers.
  • How­ever, the rate of Russ­ian mur­der­ers is higher than that of Chi­nese mur­der­ers. How is that calculated?
  • Chi­nese: 200 divided by 1000 = 0.20=20%
  • Rus­sians: 50 divided by 100 = 0.50=50%
That means that there is a higher rate of mur­ders among the Russ­ian part of this fic­tional pop­u­la­tion than there is among the Chi­nese part.

Lots of peo­ple don’t get this, even a few who were edu­cated before my time. How­ever, some of us were pay­ing baldilocksatten­tion dur­ing eighth grade math.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel, ten­ta­tively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism — -»»

mathishardby baldilocks

It was difficult to believe at first; that there were functioning adults who didn’t understand the difference between raw numbers and rate.

However, since I found out that children aren’t taught anymore to do things like write in cursive and since I found out that there are young Americans who cannot identify the United States on a map, I’ve pretty much figured out that K-12 schools are, for a significant part, just glorified day-care–and from what we’re seen in the last few weeks, that day-care can last well into higher education.

So you pay the government to educate your kid and it doesn’t. Then you pay thousands to hundreds of thousands of dollars to some college/university, and all your offspring learn how to do is to refine their whining skills.

But you come here to Da Tech Guy blog and I’ll give you and your kid something useful.

Here’s your mini-tutorial on how to calculate the rate of a group and how to compare two separate rates.

  • Say you have a population of 1100: 1000 Chinese and 100 Russians.
  • 200 of the Chinese are murderers and 50 of the Russians are murderers.
  • Therefor, in our sample, there are more murderers who are Chinese than there are murderers who are Russians in raw numbers.
  • However, the rate of Russian murderers is higher than that of Chinese murderers. How is that calculated?
  • Chinese: 200 divided by 1000 = 0.20=20%
  • Russians: 50 divided by 100 = 0.50=50%
That means that there is a higher rate of murders among the Russian part of this fictional population than there is among the Chinese part.

Lots of people don’t get this, even a few who were educated before my time. However, some of us were paying baldilocksattention during eighth grade math.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>