Readability

Discovering New Things

by baldilocks

Cer­tainly, we all know that this blog was picked as one of the 2015 Fab­u­lous 50 Blogs in the cat­e­gory of Best Grass Roots Blogs by a vot­ing panel assem­bled by Doug Ross. And I think that I can speak for those of us who are of the Mag­nif­i­cent Seven when I say that it is a priv­i­lege to be a part of Peter’s brain­child; it is its own award and reward.

One of the things I like about these end-​of-​the-​year lists and con­tests is the dis­cov­ery of new-​to-​me voices that are out there. Most of the other 50 blogs/​news sites/​news aggregators/​columnists are famil­iar to me, but sev­eral are not, and one—The Z Man—I’ve had to tear myself away from in order to get any work done…like write this post.

Here is an excerpt from post called the End of Things:

From the Civil War for­ward, pol­i­tics in Amer­ica was largely a domes­tic dis­pute between the fac­tions within the vic­to­ri­ous coali­tion. You see this in the choice of pres­i­dents. The First “south­erner” to win on his own after the Civil War was Wil­son in 1912 and he remains the great­est of out­liers in Amer­i­can pol­i­tics. Both John­son and Tru­man got there by virtue of death. The next true south­erner to win was Carter and again we see very strange conditions.

You can prob­a­bly argue that the post-​Civil War arrange­ments would have col­lapsed in the 20th cen­tury except for the great wars of Europe and then the Cold War. The cri­sis in global cap­i­tal­ism lead­ing up to The Great War and then the war itself, placed enor­mous power in the hands of the fed­eral gov­ern­ment. The rise of Amer­ica as global hege­mon after the Sec­ond War made Wash­ing­ton DC the cap­i­tal of the world through­out the Cold War.

Then some­thing hap­pened, some­thing no one seems to dis­cuss much these days. That is, the col­lapse of the Soviet Union and along with it the end of ide­o­log­i­cal social­ism. Up until the 1990, the world was defined as cap­i­tal­ism on one side and Marx­ism on the other. Sud­denly, one end of the scale col­lapsed, at least in terms of eco­nom­ics and moral­ity. In the blink of an eye, being a Marx­ist went from avant-​garde to ridiculous.

Or so it seemed back then. Of course, he goes on.

This gen­tle­man does some­thing here which I love doing — lay­ing out events, detect­ing and point­ing to the pattern(s), in order to make rea­son­able pre­dic­tions about the future. For me, how­ever, it’s hard going​.So I like it when some­one with more knowl­edge and greater abil­ity shows how it’s done. Word­smiths make me happy!

Go read.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel, ten­ta­tively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism — -»»

by baldilocks

Certainly, we all know that this blog was picked as one of the 2015 Fabulous 50 Blogs in the category of Best Grass Roots Blogs by a voting panel assembled by Doug Ross. And I think that I can speak for those of us who are of the Magnificent Seven when I say that it is a privilege to be a part of Peter’s brainchild; it is its own award and reward.

One of the things I like about these end-of-the-year lists and contests is the discovery of new-to-me voices that are out there. Most of the other 50 blogs/news sites/news aggregators/columnists are familiar to me, but several are not, and one—The Z Man—I’ve had to tear myself away from in order to get any work done…like write this post.

Here is an excerpt from post called the End of Things:

From the Civil War forward, politics in America was largely a domestic dispute between the factions within the victorious coalition. You see this in the choice of presidents. The First “southerner” to win on his own after the Civil War was Wilson in 1912 and he remains the greatest of outliers in American politics. Both Johnson and Truman got there by virtue of death. The next true southerner to win was Carter and again we see very strange conditions.

You can probably argue that the post-Civil War arrangements would have collapsed in the 20th century except for the great wars of Europe and then the Cold War. The crisis in global capitalism leading up to The Great War and then the war itself, placed enormous power in the hands of the federal government. The rise of America as global hegemon after the Second War made Washington DC the capital of the world throughout the Cold War.

Then something happened, something no one seems to discuss much these days. That is, the collapse of the Soviet Union and along with it the end of ideological socialism. Up until the 1990, the world was defined as capitalism on one side and Marxism on the other. Suddenly, one end of the scale collapsed, at least in terms of economics and morality. In the blink of an eye, being a Marxist went from avant-garde to ridiculous.

Or so it seemed back then. Of course, he goes on.

This gentleman does something here which I love doing—laying out events, detecting and pointing to the pattern(s), in order to make reasonable predictions about the future. For me, however, it’s hard going.So I like it when someone with more knowledge and greater ability shows how it’s done. Wordsmiths make me happy!

Go read.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel, tentatively titled, Arlen’s Harem, will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: HER TRIP TO KENYA! Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>