South Carolina (R)/Nevada (D) Instant Aftermath

by Steve Eggleston | February 21st, 2016

Readability

South Carolina (R)/Nevada (D) Instant Aftermath

By Steve Eggleston

Game over man, game over”

- Hud­son, “Aliens”

I could just as eas­ily titled this “The Death of Con­ser­vatism”, because that’s what the results out of South Car­olina mean. Don­ald Trump, who returned to his lib­eral roots in the last debate, won the South Car­olina pri­mary by 10 per­cent­age points. By “returned”, I mean “went deep into the Net­roots fever swamp”, as even 1990s Don­ald Trump wouldn’t have par­roted the Code Pink tripe regard­ing the Iraq War (note; Trump sup­ported the Iraq War at the time and said in 2000 he believed Iraq had weapons of mass destruc­tion) and 911 (this a few weeks removed from Trump wrap­ping him­self in 9/11’s #NewYork­Val­ues). Thanks to how South Car­olina allo­cates its del­e­gates, Trump won all 50.

Stick­ing with the debate for just a moment, those are just two of the most recent expi­ra­tions of prior Don­ald J. Trump state­ments. If that sounds famil­iar, it should.

Mean­while, Marco Rubio, and even more strongly, his sup­port­ers, have taken the nearly-​two-​decade-​long push by the GOP to get a new non-​conservative base to heart, using relent­less attacks on Ted Cruz (and only Cruz, despite weath­er­ing a sec­ond state’s worth of attacks from the Jeb Bush cam­paign) to wrest second.

That Cruz took third in the “con­ser­v­a­tive” party’s pri­mary in a state that was seen as one of the most con­ser­v­a­tive in the coun­try is dis­turb­ing. Indeed, the fact that full-​throated con­ser­vatism gar­ners less than 25% ver­sus the “slow drift left” of Rubio and the “say any­thing because state­ments are made to expire” of Trump means more than Cruz’s upset win in Iowa.

I sup­pose the good news is that, with Bush’s depar­ture, the GOP’s Next In Line prin­ci­ple, first noted by The Wall Street Journal’s James Taranto and in effect between 1960 and 2012, appears to be finally dead. That leads me to Nevada, where the Democ­rats, despite a lot of noise from the Bernie Sanders cam­paign, appear set to finally break their own equally-​longstanding Not Next In Line prinici­ple. While Hillary Clin­ton didn’t need to con­tinue her incred­i­ble string of “luck” of win­ning every game-​of-​chance tiebreaker to win the Nevada cau­cuses like she did in Iowa (and before that, in hog futures), she did.

Spy vs Spy vs Spy is alive and (un)well.

By Steve Eggleston

“Game over man, game over”

– Hudson, “Aliens”

I could just as easily titled this “The Death of Conservatism”, because that’s what the results out of South Carolina mean. Donald Trump, who returned to his liberal roots in the last debate, won the South Carolina primary by 10 percentage points. By “returned”, I mean “went deep into the Netroots fever swamp”, as even 1990s Donald Trump wouldn’t have parroted the Code Pink tripe regarding the Iraq War (note; Trump supported the Iraq War at the time and said in 2000 he believed Iraq had weapons of mass destruction) and 9/11 (this a few weeks removed from Trump wrapping himself in 9/11’s #NewYorkValues). Thanks to how South Carolina allocates its delegates, Trump won all 50.

Sticking with the debate for just a moment, those are just two of the most recent expirations of prior Donald J. Trump statements. If that sounds familiar, it should.

Meanwhile, Marco Rubio, and even more strongly, his supporters, have taken the nearly-two-decade-long push by the GOP to get a new non-conservative base to heart, using relentless attacks on Ted Cruz (and only Cruz, despite weathering a second state’s worth of attacks from the Jeb Bush campaign) to wrest second.

That Cruz took third in the “conservative” party’s primary in a state that was seen as one of the most conservative in the country is disturbing. Indeed, the fact that full-throated conservatism garners less than 25% versus the “slow drift left” of Rubio and the “say anything because statements are made to expire” of Trump means more than Cruz’s upset win in Iowa.

I suppose the good news is that, with Bush’s departure, the GOP’s Next In Line principle, first noted by The Wall Street Journal’s James Taranto and in effect between 1960 and 2012, appears to be finally dead. That leads me to Nevada, where the Democrats, despite a lot of noise from the Bernie Sanders campaign, appear set to finally break their own equally-longstanding Not Next In Line priniciple. While Hillary Clinton didn’t need to continue her incredible string of “luck” of winning every game-of-chance tiebreaker to win the Nevada caucuses like she did in Iowa (and before that, in hog futures), she did.

Spy vs Spy vs Spy is alive and (un)well.

Buy My Book!

Buy My Book!

Hit DaTipJar and Support Conservative Journalism & Opinion




Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,146 other subscribers

DH Gate Dot Com, Online Shopping

Cheap ecigarette from China - DHgate

Best Grassroots Blogs

Winner - 2014 Fabulous 50 Blog Awards

Catholic CD of the Month

Know your Catholic Faith

Da Pages

Winner - 2014 Fabulous 50 Blog Awards

Donald Trump Calls on DaTechGuy Worcester MA

 
%d bloggers like this: