Readability

Why I Hate Them

[cap­tion id=“attachment_82422” align=“alignright” width=“300”]brussels Brus­sels, Bel­gium on March 22, 2016[/caption]

by baldilocks

Orig­i­nally posted on Sep­tem­ber 11, 2006.

Two men [orig­i­nal link unavailable].

Based on the accounts of wit­nesses and loved ones’ knowl­edge of the two men’s char­ac­ters, a dev­as­tat­ing pic­ture emerges of that tragic morn­ing. [SNIP]

When the first plane hit the build­ing, [Abe] Zel­manowitz, 55, and [Edward] Beyea, 42, both sys­tems ana­lysts for Blue Cross Blue Shield, fled the office with their co-​workers. The ele­va­tors were not work­ing, and Beyea, a 300-​pound man in a heavy mech­a­nized wheel­chair, could not get down the stairs, which were choked with streams of pan­icked work­ers. [SNIP]

He couldn’t have left him,” said Zelmanowitz’s sister-​in-​law, Eve­lyn Zel­manowitz of Flat­lands, N.Y. “That’s what made Abe, Abe.” [SNIP]

Both men were lost in the col­lapse of the north tower that morn­ing. [SNIP]

There is some indi­ca­tion that they had made it to the 21st floor when the build­ing col­lapsed. Their bod­ies have not been recovered.

Why are such men hated?

On that very day, I was sad, then furi­ous and then filled with hate. I don’t feel the lat­ter much any more, but, occa­sion­ally, it flares up again; espe­cially when I read about peo­ple like Mis­ters Zel­manowitz and Beyea. Their fam­i­lies have noth­ing to bury; they only live with the mem­ory of loved per­sons. And, mean­while, other men and women are dying for hav­ing breathed in the dust of their bod­ies, along with the dust of their desks, their com­put­ers, the dust of Mr. Beyea’s wheel­chair, the dust of the build­ing in which they worked, and are dying from just plain grief.

Why don’t we hate them?

Do I hate them — the ter­ror­ists who mur­dered Mis­ters Zel­manowitz and Beyea? No, not most of the time. Nor do I hate their liked-​minded liv­ing brethren. Do I fear them? Most cer­tainly not, but that’s merely because I learned to not fear that which can kill the body — also because I knew a long time ago that the goal of any ter­ror­ist is to instill fear. Can’t give them that par­tic­u­lar victory.

But why shouldn’t I hate those who would mur­der such seem­ingly innocu­ous, harm­less and lov­ing men like Zel­manowitz and Beyea? Because it does noth­ing for either me or those two men; I’m here and they’re bod­ies are now an inte­gral part of New York City (along with those of hun­dreds of oth­ers who were never found in the wreck­age of the Twin Towers).

So why does the story of these two for­merly liv­ing men fill me with so much anger?

Because they were sim­ply liv­ing well and they should have been left alone to go on liv­ing the same way. That they died well and hon­or­ably — like so many oth­ers on that day — is uplift­ing in a way, but guess what? I would have pre­ferred that they had gone on liv­ing anony­mously rather than to have become one of the foot­notes in many a 911 post like this one.

And that’s why I hate the ter­ror­ists. Some­times. Okay, often.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism — -»»

baldilocks

brussels
Brussels, Belgium on March 22, 2016

by baldilocks

Originally posted on September 11, 2006.

Two men [original link unavailable].

Based on the accounts of witnesses and loved ones’ knowledge of the two men’s characters, a devastating picture emerges of that tragic morning. [SNIP]

When the first plane hit the building, [Abe] Zelmanowitz, 55, and [Edward] Beyea, 42, both systems analysts for Blue Cross Blue Shield, fled the office with their co-workers. The elevators were not working, and Beyea, a 300-pound man in a heavy mechanized wheelchair, could not get down the stairs, which were choked with streams of panicked workers. [SNIP]

“He couldn’t have left him,” said Zelmanowitz’s sister-in-law, Evelyn Zelmanowitz of Flatlands, N.Y. “That’s what made Abe, Abe.” [SNIP]

Both men were lost in the collapse of the north tower that morning. [SNIP]

There is some indication that they had made it to the 21st floor when the building collapsed. Their bodies have not been recovered.

Why are such men hated?

On that very day, I was sad, then furious and then filled with hate. I don’t feel the latter much any more, but, occasionally, it flares up again; especially when I read about people like Misters Zelmanowitz and Beyea. Their families have nothing to bury; they only live with the memory of loved persons. And, meanwhile, other men and women are dying for having breathed in the dust of their bodies, along with the dust of their desks, their computers, the dust of Mr. Beyea’s wheelchair, the dust of the building in which they worked, and are dying from just plain grief.

Why don’t we hate them?

Do I hate them—the terrorists who murdered Misters Zelmanowitz and Beyea? No, not most of the time. Nor do I hate their liked-minded living brethren. Do I fear them? Most certainly not, but that’s merely because I learned to not fear that which can kill the body—also because I knew a long time ago that the goal of any terrorist is to instill fear. Can’t give them that particular victory.

But why shouldn’t I hate those who would murder such seemingly innocuous, harmless and loving men like Zelmanowitz and Beyea? Because it does nothing for either me or those two men; I’m here and they’re bodies are now an integral part of New York City (along with those of hundreds of others who were never found in the wreckage of the Twin Towers).

So why does the story of these two formerly living men fill me with so much anger?

Because they were simply living well and they should have been left alone to go on living the same way. That they died well and honorably—like so many others on that day—is uplifting in a way, but guess what? I would have preferred that they had gone on living anonymously rather than to have become one of the footnotes in many a 9/11 post like this one.

And that’s why I hate the terrorists. Sometimes. Okay, often.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s Projects JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>

baldilocks