What’s next, the Trump/Jenner ticket?

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What's next, the Trump/Jenner ticket?

The fol­low­ing is a rant. Pro­ceed accordingly.

Life is full of sur­prises, most of them unpleasant.

Yes, there are won­der­ful sur­prises — a reunion of friends and loved ones for your birth­day, an unex­pected thought­ful ges­ture, great weather on a spe­cial day, for instance — but for the most part, a major­ity of life’s sur­prises come in vary­ing degrees of unpleasantness.

Two years ago, in 2014, when I was sell­ing my house in New Jer­sey to move to Florida, one (very minor) advan­tage — so I thought — would be that the Florida media would not cackle news about Don­ald Trump on a weekly basis.

I had lived in the North East for nearly forty years, and for forty years the local media (NY Post, Daily News, Howard Stern, evening news) allowed itself to be manip­u­lated daily by the thin-​skinned tough guy, the thor­oughly dis­rep­utable liar, cheat and fraud — who was a Demo­c­rat. To refer to him as an unprin­ci­pled dem­a­gogue is to com­pli­ment him. Let me spell it out for you: I find Don­ald Trump repulsive.

If back in 2014 you would have told me that exactly two years later Trump would be the pre­sump­tive nom­i­nee for the Repub­li­can Party, I would have rec­om­mended therapy.

More elo­quent com­menters than I will undoubt­edly point to Trump’s ascent as a sign of our country’s moral cor­ro­sion and blame the edu­ca­tional sys­tem, the media, and myr­iad other rea­sons for it.

Oth­ers are look­ing at pos­si­ble VP options. Ed Mor­ris­sey even has a sur­vey up at Hot Air.

I have learned a num­ber of things from this pri­mary sea­son (aside from acquir­ing some insight on my own resilience):

  1. Nobody really knows any­thing - at least not enough to make acu­rate predictions.
  2. Trump is much bet­ter at manip­u­lat­ing than Hillary, the other pre­sump­tive candidate.
  3. Trump fol­low­ers will believe any­thing — includ­ing absurd con­spir­acy the­o­ries. The more absurd, the bet­ter, espe­cially on the day of a cru­cial elec­tion.
  4. There’s no such thing as bad pub­lic­ity for Trump. All that mat­ters is the news cycle.

At this point, I would not put it past Trump, the “real­ity” TV star, to get another “real­ity” TV star, Cait­lyn Jen­ner, as run­ning mate.

It would dis­tract from the upcom­ing Trump Uni­ver­sity fraud case hear­ings sched­uled for the first day of the GOP con­ven­tion. It would offer mul­ti­ple oppor­tu­ni­ties for photo-​ops, fundrais­ers, lifestyle reports on clothes and make-​up, and tie-​ins with the Kar­dashi­ans. It would make Lib­eral heads explode. It would monop­o­lize the news cycle.

It would be yuu­uge.

At least Jenner’s a Repub­li­can — and uses Trump Tower’s facil­i­ties.

And yes, you may count that as yet another one of life’s unpleas­ant surprises.

(OTOH, it would serve Kasich right.)

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S, and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s Blog.

The following is a rant. Proceed accordingly.

Life is full of surprises, most of them unpleasant.

Yes, there are wonderful surprises – a reunion of friends and loved ones for your birthday, an unexpected thoughtful gesture, great weather on a special day, for instance – but for the most part, a majority of life’s surprises come in varying degrees of unpleasantness.

Two years ago, in 2014, when I was selling my house in New Jersey to move to Florida, one (very minor) advantage – so I thought – would be that the Florida media would not cackle news about Donald Trump on a weekly basis.

I had lived in the North East for nearly forty years, and for forty years the local media (NY Post, Daily News, Howard Stern, evening news) allowed itself to be manipulated daily by the thin-skinned tough guy, the thoroughly disreputable liarcheat and fraud – who was a Democrat. To refer to him as an unprincipled demagogue is to compliment him. Let me spell it out for you: I find Donald Trump repulsive.

If back in 2014 you would have told me that exactly two years later Trump would be the presumptive nominee for the Republican Party, I would have recommended therapy.

More eloquent commenters than I will undoubtedly point to Trump’s ascent as a sign of our country’s moral corrosion and blame the educational system, the media, and myriad other reasons for it.

Others are looking at possible VP options. Ed Morrissey even has a survey up at Hot Air.

I have learned a number of things from this primary season (aside from acquiring some insight on my own resilience):

  1. Nobody really knows anything – at least not enough to make acurate predictions.
  2. Trump is much better at manipulating than Hillary, the other presumptive candidate.
  3. Trump followers will believe anything – including absurd conspiracy theories. The more absurd, the better, especially on the day of a crucial election.
  4. There’s no such thing as bad publicity for Trump. All that matters is the news cycle.

At this point, I would not put it past Trump, the “reality” TV star, to get another “reality” TV star, Caitlyn Jenner, as running mate.

It would distract from the upcoming Trump University fraud case hearings scheduled for the first day of the GOP convention. It would offer multiple opportunities for photo-ops, fundraisers, lifestyle reports on clothes and make-up, and tie-ins with the Kardashians. It would make Liberal heads explode. It would monopolize the news cycle.

It would be yuuuge.

At least Jenner’s a Republican – and uses Trump Tower’s facilities.

And yes, you may count that as yet another one of life’s unpleasant surprises.

(OTOH, it would serve Kasich right.)

Fausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S, and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.