When Dealing with Cowards, make them more afraid of You than your foes

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When Dealing with Cowards, make them more afraid of You than your foes

Yes­ter­day there was a story about a cow­ardly town that was spooked into remov­ing a dis­play hon­or­ing dead vets by a sin­gle phone call.

A Memo­r­ial Day dis­play fea­tur­ing dozens of white crosses to honor fallen sol­diers was removed from pub­lic prop­erty in Geor­gia after some­one complained.

The 79 hand­made crosses in Hiram were meant to rep­re­sent the 79 Pauld­ing County res­i­dents who died in America’s wars, offi­cials told Fox News.

Hours after the crosses were posted along High­way 92, an unnamed res­i­dent called the office of City Man­ager Barry Atkin­son and asked whether a Chris­t­ian dis­play was appropriate.

They asked were all those fallen sol­diers Chris­t­ian, and the answer to that was not, they obvi­ously weren’t,” Mr. Atkin­son said, a local ABC News affil­i­ate reported. “It opened our eyes that we missed some­thing here, and we imme­di­ately took cor­rec­tive action.”

It’s always sad when you dis­cover city offi­cials who are eas­ily intim­i­dated but if there is one bright side, it’s that if a per­son is cow­ardly enough to be afraid of a sin­gle com­plaint, you can eas­ily use that same cow­ardice in your favor with a larger crowd:

A Memo­r­ial Day cross dis­play hon­or­ing fallen sol­diers is back up Wednes­day along a state high­way in Geor­gia, after it was taken down last week amid controversy.

and noth­ing gen­er­ates a larger crowd like social media

The cross memo­r­ial ignited fierce debate on social media — with many peo­ple say­ing its removal is polit­i­cal cor­rect­ness run amok, while oth­ers argued all faiths should be represented.

At the city coun­cil meet­ing Tues­day night, many spoke in favor of the memo­r­ial and pushed for it to be restored. Tommy Din­gler, whose son Joshua was killed in Iraq, held up a photo of the 19-​year-​old as he addressed the coun­cil, Fox affil­i­ate WAGA-​TV reported.

A cross has been used for fallen sol­diers from the time of the Red Coats, Patri­ots, Yan­kees, Rebels — they all used it,” Din­gler said.

Other atten­dees accused the coun­cil of cow­er­ing to one com­plaint, while fail­ing to honor the fam­i­lies who want their loved ones remem­bered. The city coun­cil even­tu­ally agreed, vot­ing unan­i­mously to put the crosses back up.

If you can’t make them see the light, make them feel the heat.

Yesterday there was a story about a cowardly town that was spooked into removing a display honoring dead vets by a single phone call.

A Memorial Day display featuring dozens of white crosses to honor fallen soldiers was removed from public property in Georgia after someone complained.

The 79 handmade crosses in Hiram were meant to represent the 79 Paulding County residents who died in America’s wars, officials told Fox News.

Hours after the crosses were posted along Highway 92, an unnamed resident called the office of City Manager Barry Atkinson and asked whether a Christian display was appropriate.

“They asked were all those fallen soldiers Christian, and the answer to that was not, they obviously weren’t,” Mr. Atkinson said, a local ABC News affiliate reported. “It opened our eyes that we missed something here, and we immediately took corrective action.”

It’s always sad when you discover city officials who are easily intimidated but if there is one bright side, it’s that if a person is cowardly enough to be afraid of a single complaint, you can easily use that same cowardice in your favor with a larger crowd:

A Memorial Day cross display honoring fallen soldiers is back up Wednesday along a state highway in Georgia, after it was taken down last week amid controversy.

and nothing generates a larger crowd like social media

The cross memorial ignited fierce debate on social media — with many people saying its removal is political correctness run amok, while others argued all faiths should be represented.

At the city council meeting Tuesday night, many spoke in favor of the memorial and pushed for it to be restored. Tommy Dingler, whose son Joshua was killed in Iraq, held up a photo of the 19-year-old as he addressed the council, Fox affiliate WAGA-TV reported.

“A cross has been used for fallen soldiers from the time of the Red Coats, Patriots, Yankees, Rebels — they all used it,” Dingler said.

Other attendees accused the council of cowering to one complaint, while failing to honor the families who want their loved ones remembered. The city council eventually agreed, voting unanimously to put the crosses back up.

If you can’t make them see the light, make them feel the heat.