Muhammad, the Mountain, and the Lukewarm

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Muhammad, the Mountain, and the Lukewarm

MuhammadAliby baldilocks

Before the death of the leg­endary Muham­mad Ali — a Mus­lim – I said a prayer for him – that God the Father might draw him to Jesus the Christ — and I said so on Social Media. I expected one of my few Mus­lim friends to take offense to this, but it is many pro­fessed Chris­tians who seem have more of a prob­lem with my prayer.

I won­der what Bible they’re read­ing — a rhetor­i­cal mus­ing because I know that read­ing and com­pre­hend­ing are two sep­a­rate concepts.

Now let’s get this straight; I have no idea whether God answered ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to my prayer and I’m okay with not know­ing. What gets me is how many Chris­tians are say­ing that no deathbed con­ver­sions exist. I mean, how would any­one know one way or the other? And some are ridi­cul­ing the notion that we Chris­tians should pray for the con­ver­sion of Ali’s Mus­lim family!

And then there’s that whole chron­i­cle about the thief on the cross — the one who, through an act of faith, got a last minute get-​out-​of-​Hell free card — a death “bed” con­ver­sion. When I men­tioned it, some­one actu­ally told me that this was a one-​time event — that it would never hap­pen again!

Seri­ously, why believe in a god who can’t see what’s in your heart, who doesn’t know your heart infi­nitely bet­ter than you know it your­self, and who can’t have mercy on even the worst of us in seconds?

Why believe in a God who can’t make a day last longer than the stan­dard 24 hours?

Why believe in a God who can’t take a mur­derer of Chris­tians and turn him into Christ’s most con­vinc­ing earthly apol­o­gist?

I’m unfa­mil­iar with this deity in which many Chris­tians say they believe — this god whose name is not El Shad­dai.

I’m also unfa­mil­iar with a deity who does not want us to pray for liv­ing unbe­liev­ers — like most of Ali’s fam­ily and a few mem­bers of my own.

I’m told that God is not will­ing that any should per­ish and that fol­low­ers of Christ can move moun­tains with faith-​fueled prayer, but some of my naysay­ers seem to be ignor­ing those words.

Who­ever this lim­ited deity is in whom some Chris­tians say they believe, I don’t think he’s worth wor­ship­ing. As for Ali, he knows the truth now, and it’s likely that he’s full of regret. Not cer­tain, but likely.

Don’t let that be your fate, Chris­tians; the God I do know says that we will give an account for every­thing we say and do. I have enough stuff to account for and I’m sure that you do, too. Friendly advice: limit the list.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Journalism — -»»baldilocks

MuhammadAliby baldilocks

Before the death of the legendary Muhammad Ali—a Muslim–I said a prayer for him–that God the Father might draw him to Jesus the Christ—and I said so on Social Media. I expected one of my few Muslim friends to take offense to this, but it is many professed Christians who seem have more of a problem with my prayer.

I wonder what Bible they’re reading—a rhetorical musing because I know that reading and comprehending are two separate concepts.

Now let’s get this straight; I have no idea whether God answered ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to my prayer and I’m okay with not knowing. What gets me is how many Christians are saying that no deathbed conversions exist. I mean, how would anyone know one way or the other? And some are ridiculing the notion that we Christians should pray for the conversion of Ali’s Muslim family!

And then there’s that whole chronicle about the thief on the cross—the one who, through an act of faith, got a last minute get-out-of-Hell free card—a death “bed” conversion. When I mentioned it, someone actually told me that this was a one-time event—that it would never happen again!

Seriously, why believe in a god who can’t see what’s in your heart, who doesn’t know your heart infinitely better than you know it yourself, and who can’t have mercy on even the worst of us in seconds?

Why believe in a God who can’t make a day last longer than the standard 24 hours?

Why believe in a God who can’t take a murderer of Christians and turn him into Christ’s most convincing earthly apologist?

I’m unfamiliar with this deity in which many Christians say they believe—this god whose name is not El Shaddai.

I’m also unfamiliar with a deity who does not want us to pray for living unbelievers—like most of Ali’s family and a few members of my own.

I’m told that God is not willing that any should perish and that followers of Christ can move mountains with faith-fueled prayer, but some of my naysayers seem to be ignoring those words.

Whoever this limited deity is in whom some Christians say they believe, I don’t think he’s worth worshiping. As for Ali, he knows the truth now, and it’s likely that he’s full of regret. Not certain, but likely.

Don’t let that be your fate, Christians; the God I do know says that we will give an account for everything we say and do. I have enough stuff to account for and I’m sure that you do, too. Friendly advice: limit the list.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>baldilocks