Ah the Glories of the Past

Readability

Ah the Glories of the Past

In this age of Google there are many peo­ple alive today who don’t real­ize that there was once a day when the only way to access the sum of Human knowl­edge was to pur­chase a set of Encyclopedias

While you can still buy the printed ver­sion most peo­ple just google infor­ma­tion, but for my money if I want an actual fact, rather than trust­ing open source like Wikipedia, I think I’d stick with the Ency­clo­pe­dia Bri­tan­nica with it’s long his­tory and rep­u­ta­tion

Edi­to­r­ial qual­ity has been Ency­clopæ­dia Britannica’s top pri­or­ity since the com­pany was founded in 1768. Britannica’s meth­ods for ensur­ing qual­ity have changed over time, but their pur­pose has remained con­stant: to gen­er­ate and val­i­date con­tent that rep­re­sents the best, most up-​to-​date knowl­edge avail­able. Read­ers today may find it amus­ing that Britannica’s first edi­tion, pub­lished in 1768, says about Cal­i­for­nia that “[i]t is uncer­tain whether it be a penin­sula or an island.” But for the small group of men in Scot­land who were respon­si­ble for that first edi­tion, this claim was the result of the best research pos­si­ble at that time with the resources acces­si­ble to them. Over the fol­low­ing two cen­turies, Bri­tan­nica estab­lished its rep­u­ta­tion for clar­ity, accu­racy, objec­tiv­ity, and fair­ness by draw­ing on the best author­i­ties of every era, whether the lat­est pub­lished schol­ar­ship or the most respected Nobel Prize winners.

As a rule you get what you pay for. and Bri­tan­nica is infi­nitely more valu­able than Wikipedia.

And yes I admit it, I always love a rea­son to link Monty Python.

In this age of Google there are many people alive today who don’t realize that there was once a day when the only way to access the sum of Human knowledge was to purchase a set of Encyclopedias

While you can still buy the printed version most people just google information, but for my money if I want an actual fact, rather than trusting open source like Wikipedia, I think I’d stick with the Encyclopedia Britannica with it’s long history and reputation

Editorial quality has been Encyclopædia Britannica’s top priority since the company was founded in 1768. Britannica’s methods for ensuring quality have changed over time, but their purpose has remained constant: to generate and validate content that represents the best, most up-to-date knowledge available. Readers today may find it amusing that Britannica’s first edition, published in 1768, says about California that “[i]t is uncertain whether it be a peninsula or an island.” But for the small group of men in Scotland who were responsible for that first edition, this claim was the result of the best research possible at that time with the resources accessible to them. Over the following two centuries, Britannica established its reputation for clarity, accuracy, objectivity, and fairness by drawing on the best authorities of every era, whether the latest published scholarship or the most respected Nobel Prize winners.

As a rule you get what you pay for. and Britannica is infinitely more valuable than Wikipedia.

And yes I admit it, I always love a reason to link Monty Python.