Readability

Impressions

[cap­tion id=“attachment_87718” align=“aligncenter” width=“300”] Yes, I quit doing this again.[/caption]

by baldilocks

I’m hav­ing a bit of trou­ble con­cen­trat­ing today. Not an unusual state of affairs, but, today, it’s really bad due to the fact that I’m in the process of incor­po­rat­ing new habits into my life. So I leave you with a review of my already-​published novel while I work on the new one. Dis­claimer: the review was writ­ten by my old co-​blogger. As with my own re-​posts, it’s slightly edited.


Tale of The Tigers is a story of two col­lege kids who fall in love. It’s about race and racism. It’s a time cap­sule of the early 90s. It looks at the dynam­ics of fam­ily rela­tion­ships. It exam­ines sex and sex­u­al­ity. It reassesses sacred cows of the cult of the polit­i­cally cor­rect. It makes impor­tant state­ments about friend­ship, loy­alty and trust.

Like her blog writ­ing, Ms. Ochieng’s novel is chock full of sub­tleties. Her char­ac­ters could’ve turned into card­board cut-​outs. Instead, the folks that inhabit Tale are flesh and blood peo­ple, full of admirable traits and painful weak­nesses. The out­line of the plot never devolves into a cliché romance. Thank­fully, Baldilocks takes the story in unex­pected direc­tions. Tale stu­diously avoids telegraph­ing its punches, which makes for an excit­ing read.

Beyond these great things, for me the best part of the book is the fact that the story stays with you long after you’ve fin­ished it. You’ll find your­self replay­ing sequences from the book in your mind. More­over, you’ll catch your­self pon­der­ing the book’s themes long after you’ve put it down.

In short, Tale of The Tigers is a damn fine piece of work from a writer with a pow­er­ful voice.

(Thanks to James Del Rey)

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Jour­nal­ism — -»»>baldilocks

Yes, I quit doing this again.

by baldilocks

I’m having a bit of trouble concentrating today. Not an unusual state of affairs, but, today, it’s really bad due to the fact that I’m in the process of incorporating new habits into my life. So I leave you with a review of my already-published novel while I work on the new one. Disclaimer: the review was written by my old co-blogger.  As with my own re-posts, it’s slightly edited.


Tale of The Tigers is a story of two college kids who fall in love.  It’s about race and racism.  It’s a time capsule of the early 90s.  It looks at the dynamics of family relationships.  It examines sex and sexuality.  It reassesses sacred cows of the cult of the politically correct.  It makes important statements about friendship, loyalty and trust.

Like her blog writing, Ms. Ochieng’s novel is chock full of subtleties.  Her characters could’ve turned into cardboard cut-outs.  Instead, the folks that inhabit Tale are flesh and blood people, full of admirable traits and painful weaknesses.  The outline of the plot never devolves into a cliché romance.  Thankfully, Baldilocks takes the story in unexpected directions.  Tale studiously avoids telegraphing its punches, which makes for an exciting read.

Beyond these great things, for me the best part of the book is the fact that the story stays with you long after you’ve finished it.  You’ll find yourself replaying sequences from the book in your mind.  Moreover, you’ll catch yourself pondering the book’s themes long after you’ve put it down.

In short, Tale of The Tigers is a damn fine piece of work from a writer with a powerful voice.

(Thanks to James Del Rey)

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>>baldilocks