I was at Lucianne.com looking for ideas for a post when I noticed these two pieces within five posts of each other that were interesting. One pushing a Reuters story from the 19th:

trump 1

The other posting a mediate story saying the exact opposite:

trump 2

I thought they would make an interesting contrast so I tried to pull up both stories, the Mediaite story dated today came up easy.

However when I tried to click on the Reuters link I kept getting “page not found”.

I tried a search for the title and found multiple results such as this one at Forbes:

Trump Visits Baton Rouge, Despite Governor’s Request Not To

We welcome him to Louisiana…but not for a photo-op,’ the Democratic governor said.


U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his running mate toured the flood-damaged city of Baton Rouge on Friday, despite the Democratic Louisiana governor’s urging not to make political stops in areas affected by recent deadly rains.

Trump’s motorcade drove past piles of possessions and building materials that had been ripped out of flooded homes en route to Greenwell Springs Baptist Church in a flood-ravaged portion of East Baton Rouge Parish.

“You’re all going to be fine, you’re going to be fine,” Trump told several dozen supporters gathered outside, many asking for autographs and selfies.

But for the life of me I couldn’t find the story at Reuters.  So I went to the Reuters site and looked for the story.  There was no sign of it, but I DID find this story, with a time stamp a few hours later with this title:

Trump tours flooded Louisiana, Obama to visit next week

And when I looked at the body of the story it seemed awfully…familiar (emphasis mine)

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump toured flood-battered Louisiana on Friday, shrugging off the Democratic state governor’s plea for politicians not to stop in areas affected by deadly rains.

President Barack Obama said he was also eager for a firsthand look at the damage done by floods that damaged more than 40,000 homes and killed at least 13 people, announcing plans to visit Baton Rouge on Tuesday.

Obama’s travel requires a massive retinue of Secret Service agents and assistance from local and state law enforcement officials, so the White House usually waits to visit disaster zones to avoid tying up police and emergency resources needed elsewhere.

On Friday, Trump’s motorcade drove past piles of possessions and building materials that had been ripped out of flooded homes en route to Greenwell Springs Baptist Church in a hard-hit portion of East Baton Rouge Parish.

“You’re going to be fine,” Trump told several dozen supporters gathered outside, many asking for autographs and selfies.

LA governor John Bel Edwards found his original statement had not gone over well and decided to revise it, apparently Reuters found that their old story noting the president would not be visiting for a while wasn’t playing well either so they decided to :

Delete the original story

Rewrite the headline to emphasize that president Obama was visiting Louisiana

Insert new copy into the old story suggesting president was ALWAYS going to visit while making an excuse for his failure to do so before the Trump visit.

Or put simply, the attempt to advance the narrative of Trump as an opportunist for visiting Louisiana  and Obama as responsible by not visiting had not only failed but proved inconvenient.  So Reuters decided, rather than write a new story to show the president’s change of heart and showing him forced to visit in reaction to Donald Trump’s move, decided to rewrite history to push the narrative of the president planning to visit this week all along.

There are many words to describe this, I choose “dishonest” and “dishonorable”.

As  Michael Goodwin quoted by Ed Driscoll at Instapundit put it American journalism is collapsing before our eyes,

Personally I disagree, I suspect American journalism was always like this, it’s just that thanks to the net it’s not possible to hide these trick anymore.

Unexpectedly.


Today starts the last two weeks of our 6 week tryouts for Da Magnificent Prospects You can check out their work Monday evening, Tuesday at Noon, All Day Thursday and Saturday at noon. If you like what you see from them consider hitting DaTipjar in support of them (and please mention their name when you do) as both internet hits and tipjar hits will be part of scoring who stays & who goes.

(If you can’t see DaTipJar button below on their posts use the one on the 2nd column on the right)




Olimometer 2.52

Please consider Subscribing. If less than 1/3 of 1% of our readers subscribed at $10 a month we’d have the 114.5 subscribers needed to our annual goal all year without solicitation.

Plus of course all subscribers get my weekly podcast emailed directly to you before it goes up anywhere else.


Choose a Subscription level



Ruberry Black Sox
Ruberry in June with man in 1919 White Sox uniform

By John Ruberry

As this decade winds down you can look for many 100th anniversary articles. They’ll be a huge uptick of them next year to mark the centennial of America’s entry into World War I, followed by more on the armistice that concluded “the war to end all wars” in 1918. The execution of the czar and his family, as well as the fall of the Houses of Hohenzollern and Habsburg also occurred that year, events all directly related to World War I.

In 2019 baseball fans will mark 100 years since the Black Sox Scandal, when eight Chicago White Sox players conspired with gamblers to throw, that is, purposely lose the 1919 World Series.

“It never occurred to me that one man could start to play with the faith of fifty million people — with the single-mindedness of a burglar blowing a safe,” F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Nick Carraway remarked about the scandal in The Great Gatsby.

That one man, although given a fictionalized name in Gatbsy, was Arnold Rothstein, the mastermind of the scandal, although one of the few things that historians agree upon is that its genesis came from Charles “Chick” Gandil, the first baseman for the 1919 South Siders.

What does the First World War have to do with Major League Baseball’s most notorious scandal. Plenty. In his book The Betrayal: The 1919 World Series and the Birth of Modern Baseball, Charles Fountain looks back at “the war to end all wars” and goes back much further.

Comiskey statue, US Cellular Field
Comiskey statue, US
Cellular Field

The most famous member of the Black Sox of course was the illiterate–but, as Fountain explains, in no way dumb, left fielder Shoeless Joe Jackson. During the Great War Jackson was one of the baseball players who avoided military service by joining a defense industry factory baseball team where he made perhaps the same, if not more money than he did playing for owner Charles Comiskey’s White Sox. In recreating the setting of early 20th-century baseball, Fountain, a Northeastern University journalism professor, shows that there was plenty of money “out there” for players, as a third circuit, the Federal League, proved in 1914 and 1915 by luring players from the established National and American leagues with more lucrative contracts.

Another way to collect extra cash was to throw games, and Fountain spends an entire chapter on the now largely forgotten Hal Chase, a talented first baseman who was the first homegrown star of the New York Yankees, whom he dubs “the Prince of Fixers.”

There was more gambling cash involved in baseball than ever during World War I, as President Woodrow Wilson’s “work or fight” labor policy inadvertently led to the closing of most horse racing tracks for the duration of the conflict. Money for wagering wasn’t just going to idly sit in gamblers’ wallets until the war ended. While some minor baseball leagues suspended play during the war, the big leagues, despite shortened seasons in 1918 and 1919, were still in business. And so were the gamblers. The war, and Wilson, upset the economic balance of the underworld.

After the Cincinnati Reds won the World Series, or after the South Siders lost it, and despite an investigation by Comiskey that seemed to suggest some White Sox players weren’t playing, as how it was said back then, on-the-square, it would take an unrelated gambling incident for the scandal to break wide open in the final week of the 1920 season, as the White Sox were in a heated pennant race that they would lose to the Cleveland Indians. The fixers almost got away with it. As the eight Black Sox players were exposed, Fountain details the playing out of a longstanding feud between Comiskey and American League president Ban Johnson, one that nearly put the junior circuit out of business with the creation of a new 12-team National League. Of course the two-league majors survived, ruled by a man seemingly removed from the Old Testament, federal Judge Kennesaw Mountain Landis.

John "Lee" Ruberry of the Magnificent Seven
John “Lee” Ruberry of the Magnificent Seven

As White Sox left the ranks of baseball’s elite in 1920, modern baseball, the post-dead ball era, began. No one knew it at the time, but the Golden Age of Sports, led by the New York Yankees’ Babe Ruth, had also arrived. Comiskey, who died in 1931, never put another contending team on the field, and the White Sox wouldn’t return to the Fall Classic until 1959–and the South Siders wouldn’t win it all until 2005. But the owner nicknamed “the Old Roman” was still able to cash in on the rollicking Roaring Twenties party; Comiskey Park was expanded in 1927, largely because of Ruth’s transformation of baseball.

Comiskey is treated somewhat sympathetically here, as someone who is more frugal than stingy.

Fountain’s effort succeeds not only as a baseball book but as an historical work. Which means you don’t have to be a fan of the national pastime to enjoy it.

John Ruberry, a lifelong White Sox fan, regularly blogs at Marathon Pundit.

I got to Redstate a tad late on the final day as I had crashed the night before quickly and needed to pack. The Hotel agreed to hold our bags as checkout time was noon and our flight wasn’t until 6:50 pacific. As soon as I was done I headed over to Redstate and the interviews began

I talked to Kevin Boyd who had also attended Amplify choice

And then managed to speak to Katie Pavlich

It was interesting to note the fame she had gained over the last few years didn’t keep her from manning the registration table greeting people as they came

Followed swiftly by Ed Morrissey who also talked a little Pope Francis with me

But the interviews were not confined to TV personalities and bloggers I talked to attendees such as Todd

and Joan

who had offered me & dawife a ride to the airport which would have been our backup emergency plan

In between interviews I also saw the presentation of Senator Cory Gardner

Sen Cory Gardner
Sen Cory Gardner

And Carly Fiorina, whose speech I was tweeting out as it happened

It’s my opinion that other things not withstanding the highlight of redstate was when Leon Wolf opened things up to the crowd, I wrote about that here.

And later interviewed Leon about it.

One of the most interesting interviews of the trip was with Kelly Maher who not only talked policy but carries a Wallaby in her purse

For those of you who skip the interview I wasn’t kidding

Welby the Wallaby at Redstate
Welby the Wallaby at Redstate

But in the end my flight time ruled the roost so I had to head out but I managed to catch Pundit Pete who had attended both Amplify choice and redstate on the way

I caught the springhill suite shuttle back to the hotel and after gathering our stuff waited a bit while they made one more run before taking us to union station. As Valery & I waited Amelia Hamilton showed up with Kimberlee Kaye and together they were my final interview of the trip

From there came the shuttle, the train the airport and the flight. Denver was behind us and the storms that had been hitting New England ahead but our oldest and his friend were there to pick us up and get us home and by 3:30 AM on Sunday I was able to put my head to pillow and sleep in my own bed.

As good as the week was, that was a real pleasure.