Cause and Effect: Louisiana’s Flooding MSM Coverage Edition

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Cause and Effect: Louisiana's Flooding MSM Coverage Edition

Lost in all the talk about the Cajun Navy and the job that they are doing are a fact that every­one out­side of Louisiana seems to have missed that is per­fectly illus­trated by Pat Austin of DaTechGuy’s Mag­nif­i­cent Seven

A week after the cat­a­clysmic event, the national media is slowly begin­ning to notice that Louisiana is flooding.

The scale of the dis­as­ter is huge:

In Liv­ingston Parish, 87% of the homes there flooded. In Baton Rouge, at least 40,000 homes are believed to have flooded. Most of these peo­ple don’t have flood insur­ance. The num­bers are staggering.

Liv­ingston Parish’s web site is here Accord­ing to Wikipedia: Liv­ingston Parish Louisiana is 703 square miles just under 58% of the size of the state of Rhode Island, with over 100,000 peo­ple liv­ing there, and that’s just one parish in Louisiana.

Rod Dreher wrote about it at the time with a head­line: What the Hell is Wrong with the National Media:

The sher­iff of Liv­ingston Parish is say­ing that over 100,000 peo­ple in his parish alone lost every­thing they own. But hey, on CNN, Adele’s not Bey­oncé, a sports­caster is on TV in his draw­ers, and Don­ald Trump is hear­ing things. Haw haw!

It’s not just them. On the CBS News web­page as I type this, the lead story is the arrest of a sus­pect in the mur­der of Mus­lims in Queens. If you want to find out the lat­est in what is shap­ing up to be one of the nation’s worst-​ever nat­ural dis­as­ters, you have to scroll way down, past sev­eral Olympics sto­ries (includ­ing an explainer of why the water in Rio pools turned green), a piece on Hillary’s promise to love Scran­ton, a piece about a Cal­i­for­nia fire that destroyed 175 struc­tures and left “dozens of fam­i­lies home­less,” and a piece about a New York woman who says her head felt like it was going to explode when she was struck by lightning.

Look, noth­ing against the lighting-​strike lady or those dozens of Cal­i­for­nia fam­i­lies who are with­out homes tonight. But guess what, CBS? In Ascen­sion Parish, just south of Baton Rouge, 15,000 homes and busi­ness are under­wa­ter!

and he fol­lowed up a week later not­ing that even when they both­ered to get around to it now that Trump and Obama has vis­ited it still doesn’t reflect how bad things are

I watched a report on NBC News last night about what we’re going through here, and was struck by the enor­mous dis­tance between what they showed on that short clip, and the real­ity that peo­ple here see every day. It is much, much worse than most Amer­i­cans know (see this for one glimpse, and imag­ine this mul­ti­plied by tens of thou­sands). The need is so great that there is no way this or any gov­ern­ment could respond effec­tively to it on their own.

There is a sim­ple rea­son for this and Ed Driscoll nailed it a bit ago

there’s no polit­i­cal angle to beat up Repub­li­cans, when the state’s gov­er­nor is a Demo­c­rat, and so is the president.

Or as Jim Ger­aghty put it

If you view the national news media, based in New York, Wash­ing­ton, Los Ange­les and a hand­ful of other cities, as way too mono­lithic in its polit­i­cal views and dri­ven by con­scious and sub­con­scious agen­das, the half-​hearted-​at-​best inter­est in these sto­ries isn’t that hard to explain. These sto­ries aren’t eas­ily used to advance the nar­ra­tive that Repub­li­cans are bad and Democ­rats are good.

This is cause and effect at its finest, the flood­ing and destruc­tion in Louisiana is not help­ful to the media’s cause, thus the effects of said dis­as­ter, the suf­fer­ing, the home­less­ness, even among poor blacks who might be expected to vote demo­c­rat sim­ply doesn’t count.

This is what our media cul­ture has become and at National Review a com­men­ta­tor asks the obvi­ous question:

It’s great that we all real­ize this. But what does one actu­ally do?

That’s on each one of us.


If you like what you see here please con­sider hit­ting DaTipJar




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Lost in all the talk about the Cajun Navy and the job that they are doing are a fact that everyone outside of Louisiana seems to have missed that is perfectly illustrated by Pat Austin of DaTechGuy’s Magnificent Seven

A week after the cataclysmic event, the national media is slowly beginning to notice that Louisiana is flooding.

The scale of the disaster is huge:

In Livingston Parish, 87% of the homes there flooded.  In Baton Rouge, at least 40,000 homes are believed to have flooded.  Most of these people don’t have flood insurance.  The numbers are staggering.

Livingston Parish’s web site is here According to Wikipedia:  Livingston Parish Louisiana is 703 square miles just under 58% of the size of the state of Rhode Island, with over 100,000 people living there, and that’s just one parish in Louisiana.

Rod Dreher wrote about it at the time with a headline:  What the Hell is Wrong with the National Media:

The sheriff of Livingston Parish is saying that over 100,000 people in his parish alone lost everything they own. But hey, on CNN, Adele’s not Beyoncé, a sportscaster is on TV in his drawers, and Donald Trump is hearing things. Haw haw!

It’s not just them. On the CBS News webpage as I type this, the lead story is the arrest of a suspect in the murder of Muslims in Queens. If you want to find out the latest in what is shaping up to be one of the nation’s worst-ever natural disasters, you have to scroll way down, past several Olympics stories (including an explainer of why the water in Rio pools turned green), a piece on Hillary’s promise to love Scranton, a piece about a California fire that destroyed 175 structures and left “dozens of families homeless,” and a piece about a New York woman who says her head felt like it was going to explode when she was struck by lightning.

Look, nothing against the lighting-strike lady or those dozens of California families who are without homes tonight. But guess what, CBS? In Ascension Parish, just south of Baton Rouge, 15,000 homes and business are underwater!  

and he followed up a week later noting that even when they bothered to get around to it now that Trump and Obama has visited it still doesn’t reflect how bad things are

 

I watched a report on NBC News last night about what we’re going through here, and was struck by the enormous distance between what they showed on that short clip, and the reality that people here see every day. It is much, much worse than most Americans know (see this for one glimpse, and imagine this multiplied by tens of thousands). The need is so great that there is no way this or any government could respond effectively to it on their own.

There is a simple reason for this and Ed Driscoll nailed it a bit ago

there’s no political angle to beat up Republicans, when the state’s governor is a Democrat, and so is the president.

Or as Jim Geraghty put it 

If you view the national news media, based in New York, Washington, Los Angeles and a handful of other cities, as way too monolithic in its political views and driven by conscious and subconscious agendas, the half-hearted-at-best interest in these stories isn’t that hard to explain. These stories aren’t easily used to advance the narrative that Republicans are bad and Democrats are good.

This is cause and effect at its finest, the flooding and destruction in Louisiana is not helpful to the media’s cause, thus the effects of said disaster, the suffering, the homelessness, even among poor blacks who might be expected to vote democrat simply doesn’t count.

This is what our media culture has become and at National Review a commentator asks the obvious question:

It’s great that we all realize this. But what does one actually do?

That’s on each one of us.


If you like what you see here please consider hitting DaTipJar




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Please consider Subscribing. If less than 1/3 of 1% of our readers subscribed at $10 a month we’d have the 114.5 subscribers needed to our annual goal all year without solicitation.

Plus of course all subscribers get my weekly podcast emailed directly to you before it goes up anywhere else.


Choose a Subscription level