Global Pandemic: Crazy Elections

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Global Pandemic: Crazy Elections

HumanParasiteby baldilocks

It looks like our coun­try isn’t the only one which is expe­ri­enc­ing elec­tion insan­ity. From Philip Ochieng:

An ide­ol­ogy is any sys­tem­atic set of reli­gious or polit­i­cal ideals. Ide­ally, then, every polit­i­cal party should be iden­ti­fi­able by dis­tinct ide­o­log­i­cal thought. But, if so, what is the ide­o­log­i­cal dif­fer­ence between Kenya’s rul­ing and oppo­si­tion par­ties? Every think­ing voter ought to pose that ques­tion con­cern­ing Kenya’s mas­sive switch­ing of par­ties every time the Gen­eral Elec­tion looms.

Because the next such polls are nigh, Kenya’s politi­cians now dash from party to party. The polit­i­cal migra­tion will reach its apogee upon party nom­i­na­tions, when cer­tain can­di­dates have failed to be licensed to vie for civic and par­lia­men­tary seats.

But if a party is a bas­tion of dis­crete ideals, how can pre-​election “party-​hopping” be the chief char­ac­ter­is­tic of Kenya’s alleged “multi-​party democracy”?

The answer is that none of Kenya’s plethora of par­ties ­­­is a truly ide­o­log­i­cal move­ment. All our polit­i­cal asso­ci­a­tions are prac­ti­cally iden­ti­cal by their empti­ness of social thought.

Father attrib­utes this dearth to the idea that his countrymen

have adopted that lan­guage but do not bother to mas­ter its nuances that our moral and intel­lec­tual vacu­ity looks so much more spec­tac­u­lar than the Anglo-​Saxon world’s.

In all for­mer Euro­pean colonies, we do not even know how to pre­tend about it. We vote not for the social beauty of ideas – not for ide­olo­gies – but for some­thing else. To call a spade by its name, Kenya’s big tribes vote only for the pres­i­den­tial can­di­date iden­ti­fi­able with their clus­ter of tribes. It is a deeply embar­rass­ing man­i­fes­ta­tion of our back­ward­ness in social ideals.

Father shouldn’t be embar­rassed. It’s what we’ve become here in this bas­tion of the Anglo-​Saxon ide­al­ism for the last few elec­tions. I imag­ine that things get lost in trans­la­tion in the other for­mer British colonies where Eng­lish is not the first lan­guage spo­ken at home, but Amer­i­cans don’t have that excuse.

Both sets of peo­ple — Kenyans and Amer­i­cans – do have some­thing else in com­mon, how­ever: few mem­bers of either set of cit­i­zens have been for­mally edu­cated into under­stand­ing the impor­tance of ideals — of prin­ci­ples. And I don’t know about the Kenyans, but I’ve been greatly sur­prised to find out that many, even most self-​identified polit­i­cal con­ser­v­a­tives, don’t really know what ideals/​principles are. That isn’t an accident.

And, with­out ideals, what’s left? Trib­al­ism of many vari­eties, but these are almost always of the eth­nic type.

Like my father says, the politi­cians and the con­stituents in his coun­try don’t even try to fake it. I’d say that we’ve come to that point in the USA as well.

Hang on! It’s going to be a bumpy election.

Juli­ette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was pub­lished in 2012. Her sec­ond novel will be done in 2016. Fol­low her on Twit­ter.

Please con­tribute to Juliette’s JOB: Her new novel, her blog, her Inter­net to keep the lat­ter going and COF­FEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Inde­pen­dent Jour­nal­ism — -»»>baldilocks

HumanParasiteby baldilocks

It looks like our country isn’t the only one which is experiencing election insanity. From Philip Ochieng:

An ideology is any systematic set of religious or political ideals. Ideally, then, every political party should be identifiable by distinct ideological thought. But, if so, what is the ideological difference between Kenya’s ruling and opposition parties? Every thinking voter ought to pose that question concerning Kenya’s massive switching of parties every time the General Election looms.

Because the next such polls are nigh, Kenya’s politicians now dash from party to party. The political migration will reach its apogee upon party nominations, when certain candidates have failed to be licensed to vie for civic and parliamentary seats.

But if a party is a bastion of discrete ideals, how can pre-election “party-hopping” be the chief characteristic of Kenya’s alleged “multi-party democracy”?

The answer is that none of Kenya’s plethora of parties ­­­is a truly ideological movement. All our political associations are practically identical by their emptiness of social thought.

Father attributes this dearth to the idea that his countrymen

have adopted that language but do not bother to master its nuances that our moral and intellectual vacuity looks so much more spectacular than the Anglo-Saxon world’s.

In all former European colonies, we do not even know how to pretend about it. We vote not for the social beauty of ideas – not for ideologies – but for something else. To call a spade by its name, Kenya’s big tribes vote only for the presidential candidate identifiable with their cluster of tribes. It is a deeply embarrassing manifestation of our backwardness in social ideals.

Father shouldn’t be embarrassed. It’s what we’ve become here in this bastion of the Anglo-Saxon idealism for the last few elections. I imagine that things get lost in translation in the other former British colonies where English is not the first language spoken at home, but Americans don’t have that excuse.

Both sets of people—Kenyans and Americans–do have something else in common, however: few members of either set of citizens have been formally educated into understanding the importance of ideals—of principles. And I don’t know about the Kenyans, but I’ve been greatly surprised to find out that many, even most self-identified political conservatives, don’t really know what ideals/principles are. That isn’t an accident.

And, without ideals, what’s left? Tribalism of many varieties, but these are almost always of the ethnic type.

Like my father says, the politicians and the constituents in his country don’t even try to fake it. I’d say that we’ve come to that point in the USA as well.

Hang on! It’s going to be a bumpy election.

Juliette Akinyi Ochieng blogs at baldilocks. (Her older blog is located here.) Her first novel, Tale of the Tigers: Love is Not a Game, was published in 2012. Her second novel will be done in 2016. Follow her on Twitter.

Please contribute to Juliette’s JOB:  Her new novel, her blog, her Internet to keep the latter going and COFFEE to keep her going!

Or hit Da Tech Guy’s Tip Jar in the name of Independent Journalism—->>>>>baldilocks