I spoke to Fr. Mitch Pacwa after sitting in on his live show during my Trip to EWTN with the WQPH pilgrimage group.

The most important line? “If you don’t have time to pray they’ll be nothing” Now that’s a priest

I also interviewed his guest that day Author Peter Williamson who is writing commentaries of scripture:

The Show is here you might recognize the fellow in the scarf asking a question on air in at 35:50

Incidentally you also might recognize the room where I interviewed Fr Pacwa as Mother Angelica’s old office at EWTN where she was miraculously a couple of decades ago

If Mother Angelica is ever canonized that room would be full of 1st class relics (Things that were in physical contact with a saint). If that happens I guess I would technically become a 3rd class relic (Something that has been in contact with a 1st class relic).

As a business owner, I rely on people to enter into a covenant of sorts. I need them to be there for me and I need to be there for them. As such, it has always been important for me to know them, to have a clear understanding of their capabilities and dedication to the job. The hiring process has always been more than just an interview and a resume; I want to know certain things about people.

Even entry-level positions have certain basic requirements, but when we’re looking for executives, we have to take it up a notch. Three years ago, when I was searching for a partner who could be the chief executive in my current company, it was important to know as much as possible ahead of time. The person I finally chose to partner with went through dozens of meetings. It had to be mutual; we learned more about each other over several months than I would ever share with a close relative. Success is easiest when there are no surprises and after three years, nothing has popped up that I didn’t know about before we started.

The application for President of the United States seems to require much less vetting than my search for the CEO of my business. It shouldn’t be that way. We as a nation are going to enter into a covenant with this person. We have to know them intimately. The way things are today, we are only allowed to know what we’re granted in privilege and we must make this extremely important decision based upon information that others often provide. It shouldn’t be like that. Would we even know that Hillary Clinton had an illness if she hadn’t been caught on camera? No.

Requirements to be President are intentionally vague in the Constitution and I wouldn’t recommend trying to change anything through an amendment, but it would certainly be nice if we could had three basic requirements, even if they were informal but accepted and fulfilled by those seeking the grandest job in the world.

  1. Full Medical Background and Independent Exam: For the sake of keyholder-status, I know more about my partner’s health than I know about my best friend. The likelihood that we are being fed lies by at least one major candidate pertaining to her health is utterly ridiculous. It would be nice if a complete medical history and independent medical examination were required and either made public or given to a Congressional committee for review.
  2. Confidential Background Check, Including Financial Ties: The argument from most Trump supporters who do not call to see his tax returns is that it’s not a requirement and none of our business. Both are true. However, I would certainly feel a lot more comfortable if a Congressional committee or, better yet, a selected group of governors were granted access to a complete background check. That includes tax returns. We don’t need everything spilled onto the table for the world to see, but I’d like to know if there are concerns. A confidential financial and historical investigation of candidates is not too much to ask.
  3. Constitutional Scorecard: The President is sworn to defend the Constitution. There should be no doubt in the minds of the people that the person most responsible for defending the Constitution actually knows the Constitution. They should be required to take a test to at least let us know they have a working knowledge. How can they defend what they don’t understand?

It’s obviously too late this election year to make any changes like these, but we should learn the lessons that have come from it. Are we about to elect a President with major pre-existing medical conditions? Are we about to elect a President who is financially beholden to foreign interests? Are we about to elect a President who doesn’t know the difference between Article II and Article XII of the Constitution? It’s sad that we have to ask these questions.

As a general rule Robert Stacy McCain should be read at all times but this paragraph is so good and so true that it should be shared with every single person in the United States today who complains about a “microaggression“:

All talk about “equality” between men and women, especially in the context of history, should bring immediately to mind the fact that the vast majority of people who have ever lived were quite poor. Especially if you are judging from the standpoint of someone living in a 21st-century industrialized Western democratic society, you are applying to men and women a measurement of “equality” that is absurd. Go back scarcely 100 years, and my own ancestors in rural Alabama were plowing their farms with mules. They had neither electricity nor indoor plumbing. They drew their water from a well and cooked over a wood-burning stove. Do you think my grandfather and grandmother circa 1916 had time and leisure to worry about whether they were “equal”? They were both working from sunup to sundown, and when I say “working,” I mean hard, physical labor, not sitting in front of a computer in an air-conditioned office building.

My grandparents came here from Sicily. They did not read or write English and I’m not aware if they read or wrote Italian or not. My father worked like a dog when he was young, fought in World War 2 and came home to run a business where he and my mother worked 60 hour weeks at minimum while raising five kids. While things have been tough for me relative to how they once were I have never in my life worked as hard as my parents and grandparents have and the only reason why that is true is BECAUSE:

1. They were willing to work like dogs so I wouldn’t have to

2. The United States as the ultimate expression of western civilization made it possible for
their hard work to be a means to an end rather than the norm for their lifetime.

It is only by my grandparents willingness to come legally to this country and work hard and my parents willingness to emulate this example that my life is as good as it is. Moreover no matter how they worked they they never for a moment neglected to recognize their blessing nor fail thank God for them.

I am profoundly grateful for their example and will close with this warning from Stacy McCain that is only slightly less profound than the paragraph I’ve already quoted:

It may be easy to take for granted the peace and prosperity we enjoy as Americans, but it is not wise to take it for granted.

That is good advice that the young of today should take to heart.