So David Ortiz has played his last regular season game and ended said regular season career with a weak ground out to the pitcher.

While his finish was not spectacular let’s consider David Ortiz’s 2016 stats

Ortiz led the league in doubles with 48 (and that’s on two bad legs)
He led he league in RBI’s with 127
He led the league in extra base hits with 87 (finishing 8th all time btw)
He led the league with a .620 Slugging percentage (Ironically the only time he has led in this category in his career
He led the league with a 1.021 OPS (on base plus slugging)
He Led the league with 15 intentional walks

He finished 6th in Batting with a .315 avg
He finished 3rd in On Base percentage with .401
He finished 7th in total bases with 333
He finished 8th in Home runs with 38
He finished 8th in walks with 80
He finished 5th in runs created with 130
He finished 2nd in offensive win percentage at .756
He finished 5th in sacrifice flies with 7

and in more esoteric stats

He finished 2nd in adjusted OPS
He finished 2nd in adjusted batting runs
He finished 2nd in adjusted batting wins
He finished 5th in at bats per HR ratio
He finished 2nd in base outs runs added
He finished 3rd in win probability added
He finished 4th in situational wins added

And on the minus side was 4th in hitting into double plays with 22

For any normal player such a season would be considered spectacular.

For a 40 year old player with bad legs an feet in his final major league season that is spectacular.

No major league player in a career not ended by suspension (Joe Jackson) sudden death (Roberto Clemente) or Serious injury / disease (Sandy Koufax) has ever had a year like this to finish a career and of course there is still the playoffs to come.

I have no idea how the Red Sox or Ortiz will do in the playoffs, but even if the Tribe sweeps us in 3 and Ortiz goes 0-12 consier this.

While Curt Schilling deserves a fair share of the 2004 credit David Ortiz is the man who converted the Red Sox franchise and fans from a group of people waiting to see what would go wrong, to a franchise that believes it can win in any given year. He is a player that transformed fandom in this region.

I don’t expect to see another like him in my lifetime.

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT – I simply cannot talk politics this week; of course as I say this, I will of course gloss over politics because while I have read Gail Collins’s most recent column in the New York Times, I truly hate to draw attention to it by addressing it, but I can’t let it go.

Disclaimer: I loathe both candidates.  I’m voting for Trump because I can’t stand to vote for Hillary.  I believe the Clinton machine is dangerous and I believe she is inept (see Benghazi). My personal belief is that she has no soul.

Both candidates are terrible.

I think what bothers me about the Gail Collins column, and so many other liberals, is that so many have a devoted commitment to convincing not just me, but also themselves, that Hillary is a competent and deserving candidate.  There are others who truly believe in her; I’m related to some of those people and we simply don’t discuss politics. I know there are readers of this blog who will be Clinton voters and that is, of course, your right.  I personally think she is a terrible candidate and unqualified for office.

(I know, Trump isn’t a good candidate either.  Acknowledged.)

Collins writes:

Hillary Clinton is an imperfect candidate who is, nevertheless, extremely well qualified to lead the country. Every day, dozens of prominent Republicans say they’re going to suck it up and vote for her because they think she can, if nothing else, at least keep the country safe.

That is stunning to me, given Benghazi and given the Clinton body count.  (If you Google “Clinton Body Count” you get 9,750,000 results.  Of course most of it is hokum and wild conspiracy theory by tin foil hat people, but in some of those cases, where there is smoke…).

And as far as Ms. Collins’s reference to “prominent Republicans” who are voting for Hillary – I’m sick of them, too.  “Prominent Republicans” are primarily to blame for the fact that Trump is now our nominee.

Ms. Collins also suggests that a vote for Trump means you are just like Ted Cruz and only interested in the repeal of Obamacare.  I’m no fan of Obamacare or socialized medicine but that is so far down my list right now that it is insignificant to me, and for Ms. Collins to dismiss my position so flippantly is borderline offensive.

Like I said – I hate politics right now.  I loathe both candidates, I am disgusted with the ill-informed, apathetic people who got us to this point, I am sick of party leaders who manipulate primaries, sick of Republican leaders who don’t endorse conservative candidates, and disgusted with a leadership that has led to a near indistinguishable difference between our two parties, and now, perhaps for the first time in my life, I understand why people stick their heads in the sand and dream of England.

 

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.

Last night before hitting work I stopped at Happy Jack’s restaurant to see Howie Carr address a group of about 30-40 folk in support of Frank Ardinger’s run for state rep in the 4th Worcester district that you might have heard mention of if you saw my post and interview with the head of the Leominster republican committee at the Johnny Appleseed festival or the group of Fitchburg & Leominster residents at the Trump event in Bedford NH

Here is an excerpt of his speech

Frank spoke briefly afterwards

Before things began Howie consented to a brief interview as well

The process of changing the culture of Massachusetts begins one seat and election at a time, let’s see if Leominster is willing to do its part.


If you want to support conservative writers please consider hitting DaTipJar




Olimometer 2.52

Please consider Subscribing. Right now our subscribers consist of 1/50 of 1% of our total unique visitors based on last years numbers.

If we can get another 150 subscribers at $10 a month (another 1/10 of 1% of those who have visited this year) We can meet our annual goals with no trouble, with the same number of subscribers at $20 a month I could afford to cover the presidential campaign outside of New England firsthand.

And of course at that price you get the Da Magnificent Seven plus those we hope to add on and all subscribers get my weekly podcast emailed directly to you before it goes up anywhere else.


Choose a Subscription level



There’s a voting block that has received nearly zero attention this election year from the Presidential candidates. Hillary Clinton doesn’t have to say much because her progressive perspectives are natural and assumed. Donald Trump has mentioned it one time in a single sentence in 16 months. Gary Johnson has oddly avoided it altogether. Homeschooling families, who often vote specifically based upon a candidate’s position on the issue, have been left in the dark with innuendo and assumptions as the only ways for them to formulate an opinion. Even the Home School Legal Defense Association, which almost always endorses someone in elections at every level, is going into the final month unsure of where anybody stands. They haven’t endorsed.

It’s an issue that doesn’t directly affect many Americans because such a small percentage in this country take advantage of this crucial educational option. What people need to realize is that it’s a core issue that indirectly affects all Americans, conservatives in particular. It’s one of the last bastions of defense for those of us who believe that the government should watch our backs and essentially leave us alone otherwise. When the government tells us how we’re allowed to educate our children, the dominoes start falling.

This year marks the first in nearly twenty that my family isn’t homeschooling one of our children. Our youngest is ready to make the transition to a Christian middle school just as her siblings did before her. It’s important to know this because it means I no longer have skin in the game. Unless God grants us another child (we’re not young, but we’re younger than Abraham and Sarah), our homeschooling days are behind us. I no longer have a personal reason to fight for school choice, homeschooling rights, or any other K-12 initiatives. However, I’m a conservative who sees the big picture. Parental rights are right up there with religious liberties and gun ownership as core issues that act as a foundation for everything else.

Is Donald Trump for homeschooling rights? Probably, though his lack of attention has made many homeschoolers wonder if he is even aware of the issue. Is Gary Johnson? Possibly, though his progressive brand of libertarianism as it pertains to religious liberties should make us wonder where he really stands on education. Is Hillary Clinton? Certainly not, though as with everyone else she hasn’t discussed the issue. This is an issue for which every candidate must make their perspectives clear. Nothing implicit; we need an explicit stance that definitively declares where each candidate stands. Why? Because anyone -Republican, Democrat, Libertarian, or Independent – who will fail at protecting our Constitutional rights will first fail to protect homeschooling. It’s a harbinger issue. If they let this fall, they can’t be trusted with bigger problems.

It’s a small issue near the bottom of most conservatives’ checklist, but with such things it’s important to remember the words of Luke 16:10. He that is faithful in that which is least is faithful also in much: and he that is unjust in the least is unjust also in much.