Philadelphia: Democrat Corruption At A Glance

The tomb of the unknown soldier who fought for liberty in the Revolutionary War.
In Philadelphia stands the tomb of the unknown soldier who fought for liberty in the Revolutionary War.

Philadelphia is becoming one of the most corrupt cities in the nation, owing mainly to Democrat control.

Just before the city hosted this year’s Democrat National Convention, longtime congressman Chaka Fattah and his son were convicted of corruption.

Just after the convention, a slew of Democrat officials faced a variety of state and federal investigations.

John Dougherty, the most powerful Democrat operative in the city, has been at the center of a federal investigation into possible racketeering. The head of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in Philadelphia, Dougherty has been a kingmaker for decades, including his critical support for the current mayor, Jim Kenney. His brother serves on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Anyone who wants to win an election campaign in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania kisses Dougherty’s ring.

City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson is reportedly under federal investigation over no-bid real estate deals in the city. Johnson allegedly approved the sale of city properties without a bidding process to several buyers who contributed to his campaign.

Seth Williams, Philadelphia’s district attorney, didn’t report five years’ worth of gifts he should have acknowledged under state and local codes until recently. These gifts included a $45,000 roof repairs, and airfare and lodging to places like Key West, Las Vegas and the Dominican Republic. Williams’ lawyer said: “The true answer is, he should have reported it. He failed to do so. And he accepts responsibility.”

Former Mayor Michael Nutter and his entourage reportedly improperly used funds for a trip to Rome, among other irregularities. The funds came from the Philadelphia marathon and should not have been used for such expenses. Nutter has denied any impropriety.

At the state level, Attorney General Kathleen was convicted of perjury and obstruction of justice, and she resigned. She faces nearly two years in jail. With Kane out, top deputy Bruce Castor took over as acting attorney general. Castor, the former Montgomery County district attorney, declined to press charges against Bill Cosby in 2005 became the No. 1 enforcer of Pennsylvania law.

Two State Supreme Court justices were forced out of office for their involvement in sending pornographic materials via state email. Okay, one was a Republican. And, three top Penn State employees are scheduled to go on trial for covering up the pedophile ring of former football coach Gerry Sandusky.

Despite all of this mishegoss, a huge majority of Philadelphians will pull the Democrat lever in November.

I guess we Philadelphians will get what we deserve—a continuation of the corrupt practices at the local, state and national levels.


Christopher Harper, a recovering journalist with The Associated Press, Newsweek, ABC News and The Washington Times, teaches media law.