Unexpected, But Cautiously Optimistic

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Unexpected, But Cautiously Optimistic

Wow. Just, Wow.

I have to admit that I was much more anti-​Hillary than pro-​Trump in this elec­tion, but as a Catholic and a Con­sti­tu­tion­al­ist, I was pleased with Don­ald Trump’s vic­tory on sev­eral lev­els. As a Catholic, this was an elec­tion about Life. There was sim­ply no way I could sup­port a rad­i­cally pro-​abortion can­di­date like Clin­ton. Abor­tion is one of the non-​negotiable issues that Catholics can never sup­port for any rea­son. To lis­ten to Hillary in the debate sug­gest that a woman has the right to kill a child in the womb just before birth made my stom­ach churn. I am still not com­pletely con­fi­dent that Trump is a pro-​life as he tried to por­tray him­self dur­ing the cam­paign, but I am sure about Mike Pence and I am con­fi­dent that, with a Repub­li­can in the White House, Con­gress will finally have the back­bone to defund Planned Par­ent­hood, and I fully expect them to hold Trump to his promise of appoint­ing pro-​life Con­sti­tu­tion­al­ist judges to the Supreme Court.

As a Con­sti­tu­tion­al­ist, I agree whole­heart­edly with Charles C. W. Cooke that we finally have a chance to get back to our con­sti­tu­tional sys­tem of sep­a­ra­tion of pow­ers and checks-​and-​balances. I think that Trump’s cam­paign was suf­fi­ciently inde­pen­dent – and adver­sar­ial – that the Repub­li­can Con­gress will have the unique oppor­tu­nity to oppose him if he “goes rogue.” We know the Democ­rats will oppose him out of habit or spite, the same way the reflex­ively sup­ported Obama in what­ever he wanted to do, so Con­gress finally has a chance to reassert itself in our Con­sti­tu­tional sys­tem. It’s been a long time coming.

So sup­pose Pres­i­dent Trump decides to nom­i­nate his sis­ter or some other lib­eral judge not on his announced list of Supreme Court can­di­dates. I fully expect, and would demand, that the Sen­ate would reject the can­di­date both because he/​she is unqual­i­fied but also to show the pres­i­dent that he doesn’t have carte blanche as Obama did. Also, once again, I expect the vice pres­i­dent to have some say in the process as well. See­ing the list of qual­i­fied peo­ple that the president-​elect has cho­sen (Rudy for AG!), I’m less wor­ried than I was a few months ago that he’ll do any­thing stupid.

And finally, I choose to believe that some­one who would go through the last 18 months as Mr. Trump has, must have some idea of the mag­ni­tude of what he’s got­ten him­self into. I may be giv­ing him more credit than he deserves, but I think he’s finally run into some­thing big­ger than he is. I’m sure he’s con­fi­dent to believe he can han­dle it, and I hope he can, but I hope that the first time he steps into the Oval Office, he expe­ri­ences a sense of humil­ity befit­ting the job. And I’ll con­tinue to pray for him and for our coun­try. I ask you to do the same.

Wow. Just, Wow.

I have to admit that I was much more anti-Hillary than pro-Trump in this election, but as a Catholic and a Constitutionalist, I was pleased with Donald Trump’s victory on several levels. As a Catholic, this was an election about Life. There was simply no way I could support a radically pro-abortion candidate like Clinton. Abortion is one of the non-negotiable issues that Catholics can never support for any reason. To listen to Hillary in the debate suggest that a woman has the right to kill a child in the womb just before birth made my stomach churn. I am still not completely confident that Trump is a pro-life as he tried to portray himself during the campaign, but I am sure about Mike Pence and I am confident that, with a Republican in the White House, Congress will finally have the backbone to defund Planned Parenthood, and I fully expect them to hold Trump to his promise of appointing pro-life Constitutionalist judges to the Supreme Court.

As a Constitutionalist, I agree wholeheartedly with Charles C. W. Cooke that we finally have a chance to get back to our constitutional system of separation of powers and checks-and-balances. I think that Trump’s campaign was sufficiently independent – and adversarial – that the Republican Congress will have the unique opportunity to oppose him if he “goes rogue.” We know the Democrats will oppose him out of habit or spite, the same way the reflexively supported Obama in whatever he wanted to do, so Congress finally has a chance to reassert itself in our Constitutional system. It’s been a long time coming.

So suppose President Trump decides to nominate his sister or some other liberal judge not on his announced list of Supreme Court candidates. I fully expect, and would demand, that the Senate would reject the candidate both because he/she is unqualified but also to show the president that he doesn’t have carte blanche as Obama did. Also, once again, I expect the vice president to have some say in the process as well. Seeing the list of qualified people that the president-elect has chosen (Rudy for AG!), I’m less worried than I was a few months ago that he’ll do anything stupid.

And finally, I choose to believe that someone who would go through the last 18 months as Mr. Trump has, must have some idea of the magnitude of what he’s gotten himself into. I may be giving him more credit than he deserves, but I think he’s finally run into something bigger than he is. I’m sure he’s confident to believe he can handle it, and I hope he can, but I hope that the first time he steps into the Oval Office, he experiences a sense of humility befitting the job. And I’ll continue to pray for him and for our country. I ask you to do the same.