I spoke to Skip Murphy of Granite Grok about Election night in New Hampshire and what happens next

and briefly with Mike Rogers as well

I think interviews with significant bloggers from swing states would be quite interesting and informative, perhaps I should Try to raise $1500 to go to CPAC this year ($1000 for CPAC & $500 to make up for losing a week’s pay) and get that done.


I haven’t been in a couple of years, I think it would be worth a trip this year.

I have greatly enjoyed over the years Andrew Klavan’s columns and videos, first at PJMedia and now at the Daily Wire. He podcasts Monday-through-Thursday at the Daily Wire, leaving us with “Klavanless weekends,” as he calls them.

Klavan is witty, smart, quick and funny, and great to listen to. I knew he also wrote books, but never got around to reading one.

It is a distinct pleasure, then, to discover Andrew Klavan’s excellent memoir, The Great Good Thing: A Secular Jew Comes to Faith in Christ, which I decided to read after watching his interview with Ben Shapiro during one of their podcasts.

The book blurb tells you,

Edgar Award-winner and internationally bestselling novelist tells of his improbable conversion from agnostic Jewish-intellectual to baptized Christian and of the books that led him there.

“Had I stumbled on the hallelujah truth, or just gone mad—or, that is, had I gone mad again?”

No one was more surprised than Andrew Klavan when, at the age of fifty, he found himself about to be baptized. Best known for his hard-boiled, white-knuckle thrillers and for the movies made from them—among them True Crime (directed by Clint Eastwood) and Don’t Say a Word (starring Michael Douglas)—Klavan was born in a suburban Jewish enclave outside New York City. He left the faith of his childhood behind to live most of his life as an agnostic in the secular, sophisticated atmosphere of New York, London, and Los Angeles. But his lifelong quest for truth—in his life and in his work—was leading him to a place he never expected.Edgar Award-winner and internationally bestselling novelist tells of his improbable conversion from agnostic Jewish-intellectual to baptized Christian and of the books that led him there. “Had I stumbled on the hallelujah truth, or just gone mad—or, that is, had I gone mad again?” No one was more surprised than Andrew Klavan when, at the age of fifty, he found himself about to be baptized. Best known for his hard-boiled, white-knuckle thrillers and for the movies made from them—among them True Crime (directed by Clint Eastwood) and Don’t Say a Word (starring Michael Douglas)—Klavan was born in a suburban Jewish enclave outside New York City. He left the faith of his childhood behind to live most of his life as an agnostic in the secular, sophisticated atmosphere of New York, London, and Los Angeles. But his lifelong quest for truth—in his life and in his work—was leading him to a place he never expected.

That’s well and good, and interesting, of course, but what it doesn’t tell you is how good a writer Klavan is. Compulsive readers like myself come across dozens of blurbs about well-known good authors every day, only to be disappointed when we pick up the latest book from a writer we have enjoyed before, or a writer who is new to us but highly touted.

This is one of the best written books I have read in years.

The second chapter, Addicted to Dreams, especially stands out. It is insightful, stirring, and every sentence is perfect, conveying a time and a state of mind from the past while making both immediate and present. It achieves that effect as beautifully as John Galsworthy’s masterful Indian Summer of a Forsyte. (The highest praise I can make, since I have re-read the entire Forsyte Saga once every ten years for the last four decades.)

This is one of the few books, out of the thousands I have read in my entire life, that I recommend for the quality of the writing. The fact that his writing evolved along with the spiritual journey makes the book even more fascinating.

A few years ago David Eggers’s immodestly-titled A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius came out, and yes, it is a fine book. But Klavan’s Great Good Thing is not only great and good, it is heartbreaking, and truly a work of staggering genius.

Read it, and your weekend will not be Klavanless.

faustaFausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.

One of the most important things that drive decision making is the risk/reward factor. Is the reward for an action worth the risk being taken by doing it?

This is also true for crime. Unless you are talking a crime of passion or a person high out of their min a smart criminal will look at the risk of being caught, the risk of a particular punishment and weigh it against the reward of success

And that brings us to an important election post mortem that nobody wants to talk about.

There was plenty of talk about a “rigged” system before the election and one of the biggest signs of it was certain big city Democrat counties holding back reporting in key states.

The basic idea which has been part of the equation as long as machine politics has existed, is pretty simple and involves this little algorythm

If (Number of votes you can get away stealing) > (Number of votes you might lose by) Then

Go For it!

Else

Release you vote totals as is

Endif

I submit and suggest that this more than anything else drove the calling of certain formally blue states.  Once it was determined they just plain couldn’t steal enough to overcome the Trump wave there they allowed the numbers to go out.

But while the Democrat machines were ready in places like Florida and North Carolina, places Hillary knew would be close, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and to a lesser extent Pennsylvania were not so prepared.  Pennsylvania for example had been considered fools gold for the GOP for so long that last minute moves by the Democrats were almost pro-forma, but it didn’t stop scenes like this:

So provisional ballots are the reason that MSNBC isn’t calling Pennsylvania. This is why I found being forced to fill out a provisional ballot today so suspect. Reiterating: I had to fill one out because, according to the story told to me by the poll workers, I had been sent a vote by mail ballot, which I had never requested. Votes that are counted after election night are the Devil’s Playground for fraud. All kinds of things can happen, and they are almost never good for the Republican candidate.

I’ll wager there were a lot of Trump votes in those provisional ballots that cancelled out one mailed in for tem.

Meanwhile Democrat Bosses in Wisconsin Michigan and Minnesota had no inkling that the election was close, that being the case there was no reason why, in an age where proof of a federal offense is a cell phone video away, Dem bosses in Detroit or elsewhere felt the need to take any risk.  They figured those states were won (and they were right about Minnesota) and by election night it was too late to change it.

However that won’t be the case in 2020,  I’ll wager that in 2020 the bosses in Milwaukee, Detroit, Madison and elsewhere will be ready, we’ll see plenty of mail in ballots and absentee ballots that we didn’t see before in those states and plenty of voters looking to go for the GOP will be in the same spot that Steven Kruiser was on election night.

We have four years to prepare for this so we’d better get ready because as our friends on the left have demonstrated in the past, they play for keeps.

After all you don’t think Soros has been quietly sinking millions into AG races, you know the people who would be protesting election fraud on a local level, just because it’s fun?

You have all been warned