Report from Louisiana: Mass Shooting in New Orleans while Landrieu Fiddles

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Report from Louisiana: Mass Shooting in New Orleans while Landrieu Fiddles

By: Pat Austin

SHREVE­PORT – “It will be back to busi­ness as nor­mal. Nobody cares.” That state­ment from a woman who has worked in the French Quar­ter for six years is sim­ply tragic.

Nobody cares.”

Early Sun­day morn­ing, around 1:40 a.m., ten peo­ple were shot near the inter­sec­tion of Bour­bon and Iberville in the his­toric French Quar­ter. The gun­fire sent tourists and locals run­ning in panic. Some of the clubs closed their doors to keep out the vio­lence. One of the reported shoot­ers is dead and there are sev­eral arrests. It’s a tragedy all around but the sad thing is that this hap­pens in NOLA more often than not – it’s only when it gets close to the tourist areas that you hear about it.

New Orleans is a beau­ti­ful, cul­tur­ally diverse, fas­ci­nat­ing city. Under the guid­ance of mayor Mitch Lan­drieu it has degen­er­ated into a vio­lent, law­less dis­as­ter. I hate to say it because I love New Orleans. It’s a city that gets in your blood and lures you back. The food, the music, the eclec­tic street ven­dors, and the peo­ple above all, are for the most part intoxicating.

Sadly, the poli­cies of Mayor Lan­drieu are going to kill the tourist trade if some­thing isn’t done. Lan­drieu is more focused on things of lesser impor­tance than the blood in the streets, things like remov­ing mon­u­ments, for exam­ple. Lan­drieu spent much of 2015 fight­ing against the four major Con­fed­er­ate mon­u­ments in the city. I’ve writ­ten about that issue here, here, and here on this blog. Once that issue was safely nes­tled into the lengthy court dock­ets and appeals process, Lan­drieu moved on to gun con­trol laws. A deci­sion on the mon­u­ments is immi­nent from the U.S. Court of Appeals and ten­sions are already high.

In April 2016, Lan­drieu pro­posed a new series of gun con­trol laws which was passed and signed into law in Sep­tem­ber. Most of the ordi­nances are already on the books so it was an exer­cise in redun­dancy at best. New Orleans had 165 mur­ders in 2015, up from 150 in 2014. As of Octo­ber 17, 2016, NOLA is on pace to meet or exceed that num­ber with 134 mur­ders. Note that num­ber does not include shoot­ings that don’t end up as mur­der sta­tis­tics, such as those nine non-​fatal vic­tims in this most recent shooting.

Last week a com­man­der of the police depart­ment issued a warn­ing to women not to travel alone after dark in the city due to a ris­ing num­ber of rob­beries and car jackings:

I would sug­gest to any female, if they can pre­vent it, do not travel alone overnight,” said Sec­ond Dis­trict Com­man­der Shaun Fer­gu­son. “If you absolutely have to, stay on the phone with some­one and let them know where you’re going. Keep them abreast of your whereabouts.”

A female col­lege stu­dent from Tulane was car­jacked early Tues­day when another car struck hers from the rear. As she got out of the car, three men from the other vehi­cle got out and one of them pushed her to the ground. That man got into her car, while the other two jumped into their vehi­cle and fled.

The Con­fed­er­ate mon­u­ments are clearly not the prob­lem; the prob­lem lies in Landrieu’s fail­ure to address the vio­lence in the streets in any mean­ing­ful fash­ion. In recent protests at Lee Cir­cle after Trump’s elec­tion, van­dals were tag­ging the mon­u­ment and other promi­nent build­ings with paint, set­ting fires on the lawn at the cir­cle, block­ing traf­fic, and run­ning ram­pant through the streets. Uncon­firmed reports were that Lan­drieu told police to stand down and let them “peace­fully protest.”

There is a small group of cit­i­zens who watch over the mon­u­ments in New Orleans. They patrol nightly to ensure that no van­dal­ism is occur­ring and should some­one tag one of the mon­u­ments, the group removes it quickly. Cit­i­zens are polic­ing their own city because the mayor has ginned up such hate and divi­sive­ness that it’s the only way to pro­tect the his­tory and cul­ture of the city.

And the locals are wor­ried: with Mardi Gras sea­son just around the cor­ner, how will the increased vio­lence affect tourism? Will it be safe to go into mas­sive crowds to attend parades? The com­ments on news reports of the most recent shoot­ing indi­cate people’s anxiety:

“And this is why we no longer stay in NOLA.….Mayor Mitch Lan­drieu and his city coun­cil need to con­cen­trate on crime and not on tear­ing down history.…We will be stay­ing in Biloxi next week­end for the Saints game! So sad.…..”

“New Orleans is out of con­trol. Our Mardi Gras is going to be a blood bath if things don’t change and I don’t see a change coming.”

New Orleans is stuck with Mitch Lan­drieu until 2018.

That’s almost 200 more lives in the balance.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT –  “It will be back to business as normal. Nobody cares.”  That statement from a woman who has worked in the French Quarter for six years is simply tragic.

“Nobody cares.”

Early Sunday morning, around 1:40 a.m., ten people were shot near the intersection of Bourbon and Iberville in the historic French Quarter. The gunfire sent tourists and locals running in panic. Some of the clubs closed their doors to keep out the violence. One of the reported shooters is dead and there are several arrests. It’s a tragedy all around but the sad thing is that this happens in NOLA more often than not – it’s only when it gets close to the tourist areas that you hear about it.

New Orleans is a beautiful, culturally diverse, fascinating city. Under the guidance of mayor Mitch Landrieu it has degenerated into a violent, lawless disaster. I hate to say it because I love New Orleans. It’s a city that gets in your blood and lures you back. The food, the music, the eclectic street vendors, and the people above all, are for the most part intoxicating.

Sadly, the policies of Mayor Landrieu are going to kill the tourist trade if something isn’t done. Landrieu is more focused on things of lesser importance than the blood in the streets, things like removing monuments, for example. Landrieu spent much of 2015 fighting against the four major Confederate monuments in the city. I’ve written about that issue here, here, and here on this blog. Once that issue was safely nestled into the lengthy court dockets and appeals process, Landrieu moved on to gun control laws.  A decision on the monuments is imminent from the U.S. Court of Appeals and tensions are already high.

In April 2016, Landrieu proposed a new series of gun control laws which was passed and signed into law in September. Most of the ordinances are already on the books so it was an exercise in redundancy at best. New Orleans had 165 murders in 2015, up from 150 in 2014. As of October 17, 2016, NOLA is on pace to meet or exceed that number with 134 murders.  Note that number does not include shootings that don’t end up as murder statistics, such as those nine non-fatal victims in this most recent shooting.

Last week a commander of the police department issued a warning to women not to travel alone after dark in the city due to a rising number of robberies and car jackings:

“I would suggest to any female, if they can prevent it, do not travel alone overnight,” said Second District Commander Shaun Ferguson. “If you absolutely have to, stay on the phone with someone and let them know where you’re going. Keep them abreast of your whereabouts.”

A female college student from Tulane was carjacked early Tuesday when another car struck hers from the rear. As she got out of the car, three men from the other vehicle got out and one of them pushed her to the ground. That man got into her car, while the other two jumped into their vehicle and fled.

The Confederate monuments are clearly not the problem; the problem lies in Landrieu’s failure to address the violence in the streets in any meaningful fashion. In recent protests at Lee Circle after Trump’s election, vandals were tagging the monument and other prominent buildings with paint, setting fires on the lawn at the circle, blocking traffic, and running rampant through the streets. Unconfirmed reports were that Landrieu told police to stand down and let them “peacefully protest.”

There is a small group of citizens who watch over the monuments in New Orleans. They patrol nightly to ensure that no vandalism is occurring and should someone tag one of the monuments, the group removes it quickly. Citizens are policing their own city because the mayor has ginned up such hate and divisiveness that it’s the only way to protect the history and culture of the city.

And the locals are worried: with Mardi Gras season just around the corner, how will the increased violence affect tourism? Will it be safe to go into massive crowds to attend parades?  The comments on news reports of the most recent shooting indicate people’s anxiety:

“And this is why we no longer stay in NOLA…..Mayor Mitch Landrieu and his city council need to concentrate on crime and not on tearing down history….We will be staying in Biloxi next weekend for the Saints game! So sad……”

“New Orleans is out of control. Our Mardi Gras is going to be a blood bath if things don’t change and I don’t see a change coming.”

New Orleans is stuck with Mitch Landrieu until 2018.

That’s almost 200 more lives in the balance.

 

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.