Cuba: Don’t say “good morning”

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Cuba: Don't say "good morning"

Fidel Cas­tro, slave mas­ter to his fel­low coun­try­men, is finally and offi­cially dead.

The Orga­nized Left’s Idea of a Great Leader has already been cre­mated. Last evening a memo­r­ial ser­vice, fea­tur­ing a B-​list of pres­i­dents and rep­re­sen­ta­tives of gov­ern­ments across sev­eral con­ti­nents, eulo­gized the tyrant, and

From Wednes­day, Mr. Castro’s ashes will be slowly taken east, trac­ing in reverse the route he and his bearded guer­ril­las took in late 1958 as they closed in on Havana and the seizure of power. On Sun­day, his remains will be laid to rest in San­ti­ago de Cuba, where Mr. Castro’s rev­o­lu­tion began.

The inhab­i­tants of the hell below are now com­pelled to show care­fully orches­trated dis­plays of pub­lic sorrow.

Castro’s ashes are at Granma Room of the Armed Forces Min­istry build­ing, where the pub­lic is not allowed. Instead, the crowds are directed to the José Martí Memo­r­ial, where they are to pay their respects to a por­trait of Cas­tro and a dis­play of medals that may or may not have been his. (link in Span­ish)

The Com­mu­nist régime issued guide­lines for the offi­cial mourn­ing period:
1. Cubans are for­bid­den from say­ing “Good morn­ing” (“Buenos días”) to each other.
2. No alco­hol is allowed.
3. Nightlife, the lifeblood of tourism, is shut down.
4. No loud music.
5. The neigh­bor­hood watch­men, Comités de la Rev­olu­ción, are keep­ing track of any vio­la­tions to the above rules. They also keep track who shows up (or doesn’t) to sign the book of con­do­lences at the 1,000 des­ig­nated loca­tions across the island prison after stand­ing in line for hours under the hot sun.
6. Mourn­ers are also com­pelled to sign a state­ment of com­mit­ment to the Rev­olu­ción.

Not being allowed to dis­play the most basic civil­ity — “good morn­ing” — to your fel­low man is emblem­atic of Communism’s goal: crush­ing the human spirit.

But what else can you expect from a régime whose leader exsan­guinated peo­ple to sell their blood before their execution?

faustaFausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, news, and cul­ture at Fausta’s Blog.

Fidel Castro, slave master to his fellow countrymen, is finally and officially dead.

The Organized Left’s Idea of a Great Leader has already been cremated. Last evening a memorial service, featuring a B-list of presidents and representatives of governments across several continents, eulogized the tyrant, and

From Wednesday, Mr. Castro’s ashes will be slowly taken east, tracing in reverse the route he and his bearded guerrillas took in late 1958 as they closed in on Havana and the seizure of power. On Sunday, his remains will be laid to rest in Santiago de Cuba, where Mr. Castro’s revolution began.

The inhabitants of the hell below are now compelled to show carefully orchestrated displays of public sorrow.

Castro’s ashes are at Granma Room of the Armed Forces Ministry building, where the public is not allowed. Instead, the crowds are directed to the José Martí Memorial, where they are to pay their respects to a portrait of Castro and a display of medals that may or may not have been his. (link in Spanish)

The Communist regime issued guidelines for the official mourning period:
1. Cubans are forbidden from saying “Good morning” (“Buenos días”) to each other.
2. No alcohol is allowed.
3. Nightlife, the lifeblood of tourism, is shut down.
4. No loud music.
5. The neighborhood watchmen, Comités de la Revolución, are keeping track of any violations to the above rules. They also keep track who shows up (or doesn’t) to sign the book of condolences at the 1,000 designated locations across the island prison after standing in line for hours under the hot sun.
6. Mourners are also compelled to sign a statement of commitment to the Revolución.

Not being allowed to display the most basic civility – “good morning” – to your fellow man is emblematic of Communism’s goal: crushing the human spirit.

But what else can you expect from a regime whose leader exsanguinated people to sell their blood before their execution?

faustaFausta Rodriguez Wertz writes on U.S. and Latin American politics, news, and culture at Fausta’s Blog.