Report from Louisiana: AG Landry Criticizes Mayor Landrieu’s “Hug-a-Thug” Program

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Report from Louisiana: AG Landry Criticizes Mayor Landrieu's "Hug-a-Thug" Program

By: Pat Austin

SHREVE­PORT – Louisiana’s Attor­ney Gen­eral Jeff Landry ® and New Orleans Mayor Mitch Lan­drieu (D) are in a polit­i­cal tug-​of-​war cen­ter­ing on the ris­ing crime rate in Louisiana’s most pop­u­lar tourist des­ti­na­tion. In 2016, shoot­ings in New Orleans increased by almost 25%, and homi­cides rose by 7%. AG Landry blames Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s poor lead­er­ship for the uptick in crime while Lan­drieu con­tends Landry has no author­ity over him or law enforce­ment in New Orleans.

AG Landry has taken to Twit­ter in recent days with the hash­tag #Mak­e­NewOr­leansSafeA­gain in an effort to draw atten­tion to his efforts to reduce crime in the city and his own vio­lent crimes task force which oper­ates out­side of the NOLA police depart­ment. Landry points out that “Chicago has about 20 mur­ders per 100,000 peo­ple. New Orleans is expe­ri­enc­ing twice that many at 40 mur­ders per 100,000 people.”

Landry insists that Lan­drieu is in part to blame in the increase in crime due to his agree­ment to enter into a five-​year con­sent decree with Eric Holder’s Jus­tice Depart­ment in 2012. This agree­ment is pro­jected to cost NOLA over $55 mil­lion over the course of its dura­tion. The con­sent decree came about on the heels of vio­lence in Fer­gu­son and other cities after fed­eral inves­ti­ga­tion of police depart­ments report­edly engag­ing in civil rights vio­la­tions; cities across the nation such as Albu­querque, Cleve­land, and Seat­tle have all entered into con­sent decrees with vary­ing degrees of success.

Gen­er­ally, the police depart­ments often feel hin­dered by the decree:

The head of the Police Asso­ci­a­tion of New Orleans agrees that the con­sent decree is at least partly to blame for a rise in crime in a depart­ment that remains roughly 350 offi­cers short of the state goal of 1,600.

Because of the over­sight, offi­cers are reluc­tant to ini­ti­ate con­tact,” said PANO Pres­i­dent Michael Glasser. “…The con­sent decree requires a lot of over­sight and redun­dancy, and while that prob­a­bly cre­ates a bet­ter work prod­uct, it’s labor inten­sive and time con­sum­ing, and we lack labor. What used to take an hour or two now takes two or three or four.”

AG Landry refers to the con­sent decree as the “Hug a Thug Pro­gram” and believes that offi­cers need more help, thus his task force, and he’s prob­a­bly going to push for more money from the state leg­is­la­ture to expand the program:

To do so he’s going to need fund­ing, obvi­ously, so it’s a good bet where this is going is a push at the leg­is­la­ture this spring to get more money for the Vio­lent Crime Task Force to increase its pres­ence in New Orleans and push past NOPD to make a difference.

If the leg­is­la­ture goes along with Landry, then John #Fail Edwards will have to sign off on it which will be par­tic­u­larly inter­est­ing as he is often at polit­i­cal odds with both Landry and Landrieu.

Some see Landry’s inter­ven­tion as a power grab:

But there’s some ques­tion – at least by NOPD Chief Har­ri­son – as to whether Landry’s office should be inves­ti­gat­ing crimes in New Orleans. Har­ri­son sent a let­ter to Landry Wednes­day assert­ing that “we are aware of no author­ity that per­mits you, your employ­ees, or law enforce­ment agents under your direc­tion to engage in active law enforce­ment within New Orleans or in general.”

Under the city’s Home Rule Char­ter, the mayor of New Orleans is the chief law enforce­ment author­ity for Orleans Parish, accord­ing to Har­ri­son. Landry is the chief law enforce­ment offi­cer for the state.

Landry insists he has no polit­i­cal agenda here, say­ing that pub­lic safety and tourism dol­lars are at stake:

This is not about pol­i­tics; my effort is about pro­tect­ing Louisiana lives and our econ­omy tied to tourism in New Orleans. While my office works to stop crime all over Louisiana, the spike in crime within our state’s largest city is alarm­ing. That is why I announced this ini­tia­tive and why we are tak­ing action.”

The num­bers don’t lie. Crime has indeed spiked in New Orleans and the city ended 2016 with 176 mur­ders. As 2017 opens and the Cres­cent City anx­iously awaits the deci­sion from the Fifth Cir­cuit on the Con­fed­er­ate mon­u­ments issue, due any day now, ten­sions in the city are cer­tain to rise and it’s not dif­fi­cult to see why Landry’s task force might be a poten­tial ben­e­fit to a city that clearly needs a lit­tle backup.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.

By:  Pat Austin

SHREVEPORT – Louisiana’s Attorney General Jeff Landry (R) and New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu (D) are in a political tug-of-war centering on the rising crime rate in Louisiana’s most popular tourist destination.  In 2016, shootings in New Orleans increased by almost 25%, and homicides rose by 7%.  AG Landry blames Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s poor leadership for the uptick in crime while Landrieu contends Landry has no authority over him or law enforcement in New Orleans.

AG Landry has taken to Twitter in recent days with the hashtag #MakeNewOrleansSafeAgain in an effort to draw attention to his efforts to reduce crime in the city and his own violent crimes task force which operates outside of the NOLA police department. Landry points out that “Chicago has about 20 murders per 100,000 people. New Orleans is experiencing twice that many at 40 murders per 100,000 people.”

Landry insists that Landrieu is in part to blame in the increase in crime due to his agreement to enter into a five-year consent decree with Eric Holder’s Justice Department in 2012. This agreement is projected to cost NOLA over $55 million over the course of its duration.  The consent decree came about on the heels of violence in Ferguson and other cities after federal investigation of police departments reportedly engaging in civil rights violations; cities across the nation such as Albuquerque, Cleveland, and Seattle have all entered into consent decrees with varying degrees of success.

Generally, the police departments often feel hindered by the decree:

The head of the Police Association of New Orleans agrees that the consent decree is at least partly to blame for a rise in crime in a department that remains roughly 350 officers short of the state goal of 1,600.

“Because of the oversight, officers are reluctant to initiate contact,” said PANO President Michael Glasser. “…The consent decree requires a lot of oversight and redundancy, and while that probably creates a better work product, it’s labor intensive and time consuming, and we lack labor. What used to take an hour or two now takes two or three or four.”

AG Landry refers to the consent decree as the “Hug a Thug Program” and believes that officers need more help, thus his task force, and he’s probably going to push for more money from the state legislature to expand the program:

To do so he’s going to need funding, obviously, so it’s a good bet where this is going is a push at the legislature this spring to get more money for the Violent Crime Task Force to increase its presence in New Orleans and push past NOPD to make a difference.

If the legislature goes along with Landry, then John #Fail Edwards will have to sign off on it which will be particularly interesting as he is often at political odds with both Landry and Landrieu.

Some see Landry’s intervention as a power grab:

But there’s some question – at least by NOPD Chief Harrison – as to whether Landry’s office should be investigating crimes in New Orleans. Harrison sent a letter to Landry Wednesday asserting that “we are aware of no authority that permits you, your employees, or law enforcement agents under your direction to engage in active law enforcement within New Orleans or in general.”

Under the city’s Home Rule Charter, the mayor of New Orleans is the chief law enforcement authority for Orleans Parish, according to Harrison. Landry is the chief law enforcement officer for the state.

Landry insists he has no political agenda here, saying that public safety and tourism dollars are at stake:

This is not about politics; my effort is about protecting Louisiana lives and our economy tied to tourism in New Orleans. While my office works to stop crime all over Louisiana, the spike in crime within our state’s largest city is alarming. That is why I announced this initiative and why we are taking action.”

The numbers don’t lie. Crime has indeed spiked in New Orleans and the city ended 2016 with 176 murders. As 2017 opens and the Crescent City anxiously awaits the decision from the Fifth Circuit on the Confederate monuments issue, due any day now, tensions in the city are certain to rise and it’s not difficult to see why Landry’s task force might be a potential benefit to a city that clearly needs a little backup.

Pat Austin blogs at And So it Goes in Shreveport.